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Falklands War - HMS Argonaut

View attachment 299754 This popped up on Twitter last week.

Today is the birthday of my youngest brother Iain Boldy killed in action in the Falklands war 1982 on HMS Argonaut, would have been 57 today

Year older than me.

RIP
Must have been extra hard for you, were you serving at the time as well Phil? Having also lost a brother (not to war), you have my commiserations.

Gone but not forgotten.
 
Must have been extra hard for you, were you serving at the time as well Phil? Having also lost a brother (not to war), you have my commiserations.

Gone but not forgotten.
Sorry to clarify, it was not my brother, just quoted the tweet, sorry for confusion.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
For those interested, the Chief Stoker on Argonaut sent me a DVD with photographs he had taken during the conflict, many of which I had never seen.

The first three are extracts from the engine room log, written whilst the ship was in action by the MEO.

The boiler room bomb after being disarmed & finally three of the men who were in the Boiler Room/Engine Room when the bomb came -in and converted it into open plan. With a pool. Much the same as the bomb that entered further forward, yards from me, it failed to explode, leaving us free to drone on for hours and hours telling everyone how bloody lucky we were to be alive....
View attachment 299734 View attachment 299735 View attachment 299734 View attachment 299735
could you pick my lottery numbers for me !!!
 
Few more:

war 21.jpg

The 'white' bit along the lower third of the shot (above) is the inside of the fuel tank. The upper third is the messdeck (bunkspace) above - the latticed bedframe gives an idea of scale. The curvy bit is the deck/top of the fuel tank which burst upwards as the bomb entered. The crispy/toasty bit at the top is where we decided to have a bit of a fire a few days later and the explosive that had leached out of the magazine missiles burnt-off.

war 22.jpg

Looking down from the messdeck above the fuel tank with the scorched/crushed personal kit lockers to the right.


war 23.jpg


The messdeck, in a mess after we pumped-out. The dieso fuel and water, about 3' deep, ripped-out and smashed all the kit lockers as we lolled (as in swayed, not laughing) about, plugging holes here & there whilst debris-dodging, wearing woollen firesuits and mahoosive wellies.
 
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Few more:

View attachment 299824
The 'white' bit along the lower third of the shot (above) is the inside of the fuel tank. The upper third is the messdeck (bunkspace) above - the latticed bedframe gives an idea of scale. The curvy bit is the deck/top of the fuel tank which burst upwards as the bomb entered. The crispy/toasty bit at the top is where we decided to have a bit of a fire a few days later and the explosive that had leached out of the magazine missiles burnt-off.

View attachment 299825
Looking down from the messdeck above the fuel tank with the scorched/crushed personal kit lockers to the right.


View attachment 299827

The messdeck, in a mess after we pumped-out. The dieso fuel and water, about 3' deep, ripped-out and smashed all the kit lockers as we lolled (as in swayed, not laughing) about, plugging holes here & there whilst debris-dodging, wearing woollen firesuits and mahoosive wellies.
But I bet you still had Captain's rounds and he picked you up for the sh*t state of the Mess Deck!
 
I see the QE2 is now resting and once again shiny, perhaps a few of you will have spent time on board during the Campaign
Queen Elizabeth 2 : : Home
I don't actually recall seeing much of the QE2 during the fighty bit. I remember the troops were cross-decked in South Georgia to the landing ships from the QE & distinctly remember seeing Canberra in Bomb Alley (San Carlos) but don't remember seeing the QE2 inside the TEZ.
 
I don't actually recall seeing much of the QE2 during the fighty bit. I remember the troops were cross-decked in South Georgia to the landing ships from the QE & distinctly remember seeing Canberra in Bomb Alley (San Carlos) but don't remember seeing the QE2 inside the TEZ.
"The Canberra cruises, where the QE II refuses"

I only saw Canberra in bomb alley (plus a lot of other grey fighty ships).

IIRC the QE II trooped Naval casualties back to the UK.
 
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Does anyone remember the troop accommodation ships immediately post-conflict?

Jeez, they were ropey. The Rangatira, followed by the floating accommodation that was later used as an overflow for UK prisons.
 
Does anyone remember the troop accommodation ships immediately post-conflict?

Jeez, they were ropey. The Rangatira, followed by the floating accommodation that was later used as an overflow for UK prisons.
Never get downwind of the rancid Rangatira's stern, holy stench! The other was a RoRo the "St. Edmund' from Folkstone IIRC. Mind you, the Edmund was not much better with a Battalion's worth of Gurhkas stinking up the car deck.
 
Does anyone remember the troop accommodation ships immediately post-conflict?

Jeez, they were ropey. The Rangatira, followed by the floating accommodation that was later used as an overflow for UK prisons.
By the time I got there (late 84) they had three of those floaty things. "Coastels" IIRC. Very cramped accommodation. And microbore high pressure plumbing, so no sweet corn.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
I came across this link (shared on social media) yesterday:

https://www.spink.com/lot/9033228#

What struck me was the story behind the medal about events on Sir Galahad:

I came to the bottom of a stairwell and I saw two young Welsh Guardsmen. They obviously didn´t think they were going to make it out. They shook each others hands, pointed their rifles to each others head and pulled their triggers. There was nothing I could have done to stop them. It was their decision.
 
I don't actually recall seeing much of the QE2 during the fighty bit. I remember the troops were cross-decked in South Georgia to the landing ships from the QE & distinctly remember seeing Canberra in Bomb Alley (San Carlos) but don't remember seeing the QE2 inside the TEZ.
Troops and equipment were cross-decked from QEII at South Georgia by the five minesweeping trawlers of the 11th MCM Squadron; very much unsung heroes of the conflict.

QEII at South Georgia.jpg

The elderly Ton class coastal mine countermeasures vessels (MCMVs) in service at the time were unsuited for the long passage and heavy seas expected in the South Atlantic. The first two of the new Hunt Class MCMVs were not yet operational so it was decided to requisition five deep sea trawlers from Hull and fit them with rudimentary minesweeping equipment. These vessels were commissioned into the Royal Navy and crewed mostly by the ships' companies of Ton Class MCMVs based at Rosyth: CORDELLA (HMS UPTON); FARNELLA (HMS WOTTON); JUNELLA (HMS BICKINGTON); NORTHELLA (HMS SOBERTON); and PICT (HMS BILDESTON). They endured rough weather, unreliable machinery and lack of proper self-defence armament, communications and navigation systems. Sailing to and fro on their various often clandestine missions carrying stores and personnel in the dark, with radar switched off and all lights extinguished for security, they frequently ran the risk of being rammed or fired on by both enemy and friendly forces.

Apart from acting as guinea pigs in channels suspected of being mined and landing Special Forces raiding parties, they swept 10 of the 21 moored mines laid by the Argentinians in the approaches to Port Stanley; the other mines had either broken adrift and floated away or failed to deploy properly. Astonishingly, the relatively junior officer who welded the makeshift squadron together as an effective force, led it 8,000 miles south, supervised its hazardous operations and then brought it home again four months later without its ships or men sustaining a single casualty received no public recognition for his achievement.

Here's a piccie of the minesweeping trawlers of the 11th MCM Squadron at South Georgia cross-decking 5 Brigade personnel, stores and ammunition from QE2 to CANBERRA, NORLAND and the various RFAs shuttling between South Georgia, the Task Force at sea and the beachhead at San Carlos.

11th MCM trawlers crossdecking reduced.jpg
 
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Troops and equipment were cross-decked from QEII at South Georgia by the five minesweeping trawlers of the 11th MCM Squadron; very much unsung heroes of the conflict.


The elderly Ton class coastal mine countermeasures vessels (MCMVs) in service at the time were unsuited for the long passage and heavy seas expected in the South Atlantic. The first two of the new Hunt Class MCMVs were not yet operational so it was decided to requisition five deep sea trawlers from Hull and fit them with rudimentary minesweeping equipment. These vessels were commissioned into the Royal Navy and crewed mostly by the ships' companies of Ton Class MCMVs based at Rosyth: CORDELLA (HMS UPTON); FARNELLA (HMS WOTTON); JUNELLA (HMS BICKINGTON); NORTHELLA (HMS SOBERTON); and PICT (HMS BILDESTON). They endured rough weather, unreliable machinery and lack of proper self-defence armament, communications and navigation systems. Sailing to and fro on their various often clandestine missions carrying stores and personnel in the dark, with radar switched off and all lights extinguished for security, they frequently ran the risk of being rammed or fired on by both enemy and friendly forces.

Apart from acting as guinea pigs in channels suspected of being mined and landing Special Forces raiding parties, they swept 10 of the 21 moored mines laid by the Argentinians in the approaches to Port Stanley; the other mines had either broken adrift and floated away or failed to deploy properly. Astonishingly, the relatively junior officer who welded the makeshift squadron together as an effective force, led it 8,000 miles south, supervised its hazardous operations and then brought it home again four months later without its ships or men sustaining a single casualty received no public recognition for his achievement.

Here's a piccie of the minesweeping trawlers of the 11th MCM Squadron at South Georgia cross-decking 5 Brigade personnel, stores and ammunition from QE2 to CANBERRA, NORLAND and the various RFAs shuttling between South Georgia, the Task Force at sea and the beachhead at San Carlos.
Had heard of them before but not in any detail. Thanks.

Does any country currently operate a MCMV that could do it?
 

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