Falconry, Dead or Alive Again?

#22
My lad flies a Harris, quite a few friends and contacts within shooting raptors of various sorts.

Maybe I'm just more aware of it, but it seems to be a growing sport.

SD
 
#23
lol.. only bloody town on the North Wales coast that I know of - but pretty freaky. You wouldn't touch Rhyl nowadays though I too have some fond memories from that cess pit. :)
 
#24
socialdespatch said:
My lad flies a Harris, quite a few friends and contacts within shooting raptors of various sorts.

Maybe I'm just more aware of it, but it seems to be a growing sport.

SD
The harris is meant to be a good all round hawk and from what I've seen easy enough to keep as they don't fly for 6 mths of the year or something when theyre shedding or .. You know what I have no idea what I'm talking about...

They are a good day out, my cousin used to have a Kestrel and it starved itself to death - do you want a bird like that?
 
#25
Had a Harris for quite a few years. Really miss it now - even though she was absolutely hopeless with rabbits. Excellent for Rooks though. Can recommend it to anyone. You need loads of time and a fair ammount of cash to start with - but that's true of any sport/hobby really.
 
#26
MY mate said to me when he was enthusiastically explaining things - you could get a harris and all the kit for about £200 quid. The problem was housing in a shed and the food you have to keep it at it's flying weight.
 

Nehustan

On ROPS
On ROPs
#27
engee said:
Had a Harris for quite a few years. Really miss it now - even though she was absolutely hopeless with rabbits. Excellent for Rooks though. Can recommend it to anyone. You need loads of time and a fair ammount of cash to start with - but that's true of any sport/hobby really.
Definitely something to consider for when we move out, might manage to get me away from my terminal.. 8O
 
#28
delinquent said:
socialdespatch said:
My lad flies a Harris, quite a few friends and contacts within shooting raptors of various sorts.

Maybe I'm just more aware of it, but it seems to be a growing sport.

SD
The harris is meant to be a good all round hawk and from what I've seen easy enough to keep as they don't fly for 6 mths of the year or something when theyre shedding or .. You know what I have no idea what I'm talking about...

They are a good day out, my cousin used to have a Kestrel and it starved itself to death - do you want a bird like that?
I'm told.......

A Harris is one of the easiest to train and look after, being relatively intelligent (unlike owls). Looking after these birds is labour intensive and easy to get wrong with fatal results, particularly with smaller birds. You can forget your holidays away unless you have a trusted Falconer nearby.

I believe a female Harris will set you back the thick end of £500 unless you are friendly with a Falconer, plus the accomodation, scales, leatherwork, telemetry, day old chicks etc etc etc..

Suddenly my HMR doesn't seem that dear to buy cartridges for....

SD
 
#29
delinquent said:
I've actually done falconry a couple of times mainly with harris hawks (Not exactly the falcon of kings but hey). It's a good walk out in the woods / fields but that's about it. As for being a good way of controling pests - not really efficient enough to be of any use. But like I say it's a good day out.

If you are inerested in getting a falcon of your own, I'd suggest going to an all day falcon experience and ask the questions as they are a time sink rather than money and most of the year you can't fly them depending on the breed.

There, I think I've bored myself.
I would disagree strongly with that.

Falconry is now the prefered method of pigeon control in many cities; and that is not even mentioning the current usage of hawks and larger owls in conjunction with the hounds for fox hunting!
 
#32
Gremlin said:
socialdespatch said:
I'd forgotten flushing foxes to birds, another big growth area since the ban.

SD
Absolutely ;) hehehehehe
Forgive my city dwelling ignorance here chaps, I'm quite fascinated by this thread, but tell me, is the above true? Surely a fox would have no problems with a bird? Or have I missed something?
 

Nehustan

On ROPS
On ROPs
#33
redduke748 said:
Gremlin said:
socialdespatch said:
I'd forgotten flushing foxes to birds, another big growth area since the ban.

SD
Absolutely ;) hehehehehe
Forgive my city dwelling ignorance here chaps, I'm quite fascinated by this thread, but tell me, is the above true? Surely a fox would have no problems with a bird? Or have I missed something?
I think they track it with birds, then shoot it at the kill.
 
#34
redduke748 said:
Gremlin said:
socialdespatch said:
I'd forgotten flushing foxes to birds, another big growth area since the ban.

SD
Absolutely ;) hehehehehe
Forgive my city dwelling ignorance here chaps, I'm quite fascinated by this thread, but tell me, is the above true? Surely a fox would have no problems with a bird? Or have I missed something?
Have you ever seen the talons on an Eagle Owl? Night night Mr Fox.

Round here I'd hazard a guess that most foxes are taken by single hunters with rifles either on a lamp or NV.

Organised hunts are using hounds to flush foxes to either waiting rifles or large birds of prey. The majority round here are shooting.

SD
 
#35
redduke748 said:
Gremlin said:
socialdespatch said:
I'd forgotten flushing foxes to birds, another big growth area since the ban.

SD
Absolutely ;) hehehehehe
Forgive my city dwelling ignorance here chaps, I'm quite fascinated by this thread, but tell me, is the above true? Surely a fox would have no problems with a bird? Or have I missed something?
Once met a guy at the Hawk Conservancy when I did my course. He used to hunt foxes with a golden eagle. Really strange bloke - well he would be - but really good friendss with Ashley from the HC.
 
#36
The Hawk Conservancy at Andover is a brilliant place. If you are into country things and wildlife its good but if you are really into field sports and organise a course - well it is creamtastic! You get bacon rolls and a pub lunch too...

TFB fixed one up for cuddles and my brother in law (TFBIL) a few years ago. We started with some confidence building around the birds - with a gurt big fishing eagle! Then we were introduced to our Harris hawks (morning ladies!) which we pretty much walked around with the rest of the day, walting it up falconer style to the normal visitors. We flew them all afternoon too, apart from when we flew the barn owls indoors - great crack! I enjoyed the introduction so much I went back for a two day course.

If I was more responsible with anuimals I would probably keep one but if you could see the state my dog is in, well nuff said! Hawks are pretty high maintenance pets/working animals.

Why is that horse in the picture eating a riding hat??
 
#37
The Hawk Conservancy at Andover is a brilliant place. If you are into country things and wildlife its good but if you are really into field sports and organise a course - well it is creamtastic! You get bacon rolls and a pub lunch too...

TFB fixed one up for cuddles and my brother in law (TFBIL) a few years ago. We started with some confidence building around the birds - with a gurt big fishing eagle! Then we were introduced to our Harris hawks (morning ladies!) which we pretty much walked around with the rest of the day, walting it up falconer style to the normal visitors. We flew them all afternoon too, apart from when we flew the barn owls indoors - great crack! I enjoyed the introduction so much I went back for a two day course.

If I was more responsible with anuimals I would probably keep one but if you could see the state my dog is in, well nuff said! Hawks are pretty high maintenance pets/working animals.

Why is that horse in the picture eating a riding hat??
 
#39
is there any bird of prey big enough to take herring gulls ?
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#40
brighton hippy said:
is there any bird of prey big enough to take herring gulls ?
Definetly!
 

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