Faked Car/Van service parts.

I have no doubt that they are floating about the industry, but for them to appear in the supply chain is a criminal act.
Counterfeiting of anything, at any time, is a criminal act.
When it puts lives at danger - and here I’ll also include snide veterinary products - it is worse.
That is why, in all the years I worked in anti-counterfeit, I only ever worked in sectors where lives were endangered: the Guccis of this world could go hang as far as I was concerned.
They did once ask me to do some global investigations and Int analysis for them, but I turned them down.
 
Been going on for ever.

Bogus parts tends not to be a significant issue with the more discerning operators -

Remember a Boeing 747 cargo plane that crashed into a block of flats in Amsterdam many fatalities.

No that was fatigue cracking - dont recall if it related to a flaw in manufacture - unexpected loads - or just plain bad luck
I read somewhere that it was down to fake engine mounting bolts, just after take off under heavy load one of them decided to snap.
Dont recall any incident with fake engine bolts - I do recall one where the bolts sheered on or shortly after take off as a result of poor maintenance practices ( hoiking the engine on and off with a forklift).
 
Counterfeiting of anything, at any time, is a criminal act.
I am not so much referring to the copying as the criminal act, but someone accepting uncertified parts into the logistics as the criminal act.
Having had the pleasure of going through an NTSB investigation that cost two adults their lives and both their children life altering burns, l take airworthiness of parts extremely to heart.
 
Also with motorcycle, a stupid friend questioned why I paid so much for genuine Brembo Brake pads
22 quid rear and 30 quid front
well they have lasted 6 years
his cheapo things got him as far as Switzerland, where they were down to the metal
a very expensive recovery off the motorway, and he had to leave his bike overnight until the local motorcycle shop obtained genuine spares
300 Euro in all
buy cheap pay twice

I spoke to the MD of a brake manufacturer at an event in the UK about 10 years ago about fakery. He informed me that they had a spate of complaints about the quality of their pads over the period of a couple of months. They had some pad sets sent back to them by mighty pissed off customers who were blaming them for what could easily have been catastrophic failures. The company easily ID'ed the brake pads as fakes, upon testing the make up of the pad material found it to be a mixture of, amongst other useless crap, grass (not the smoking kind), and cork that had simply been mushed up and glued into the shape of the braking surface and stuck to pressed out metal backers.

Thailand they reckoned, not China in this case.
 

Yokel

LE
Not sure how fake engine bolts would make it into any maintenance organization without someone along the line substituting them for originals which is a crime on it’s own. Every single part down to each nut and bolt has to have traceability right down to where it was manufactured and sourced materials to make them. I’ve carried out tracking on more than one occasion when l had doubts about parts meeting airworthiness.

How is this possible in the days of AS9100? I seem to remember that the windscreen failed on a British Aircraft due to the wrong bolts being used.

Likewise, there are quality standards for automotive parts - TS something or other. I have no specialist knowledge of it, but assume it is not too different to ISO9001 - testing, traceability, record keeping, etc.
 

Yokel

LE
I spoke to the MD of a brake manufacturer at an event in the UK about 10 years ago about fakery. He informed me that they had a spate of complaints about the quality of their pads over the period of a couple of months. They had some pad sets sent back to them by mighty pissed off customers who were blaming them for what could easily have been catastrophic failures. The company easily ID'ed the brake pads as fakes, upon testing the make up of the pad material found it to be a mixture of, amongst other useless crap, grass (not the smoking kind), and cork that had simply been mushed up and glued into the shape of the braking surface and stuck to pressed out metal backers.

Thailand they reckoned, not China in this case.

I have heard that story too. Hopefully the guilty bastards were caught and prosecuted. I have also heard of fake airbags. There are counterfeit medicines. The bastards will copy anything.

This is a very important topic - perhaps better suited to another forum?
 
How is this possible in the days of AS9100? I seem to remember that the windscreen failed on a British Aircraft due to the wrong bolts being used.

Not fake parts though - A case of the wrong ones being used

If* stores were involved -Its more likely to be a case of Y put in the part X bin or they picked up part Y in error and issued as part X.

*If because its also possible the engineer rooted round his tool box and found one that looked right.
 
How is this possible in the days of AS9100? I seem to remember that the windscreen failed on a British Aircraft due to the wrong bolts being used.

Likewise, there are quality standards for automotive parts - TS something or other. I have no specialist knowledge of it, but assume it is not too different to ISO9001 - testing, traceability, record keeping, etc.
Yes, the windscreen bolts were to short so not enough grip length for the nuts if l recall correctly. That particular incident is taught as part of the Human Factors in Aviation course in Canada.
 
Not fake parts though - A case of the wrong ones being used

If* stores were involved -Its more likely to be a case of Y put in the part X bin or they picked up part Y in error and issued as part X.

*If because its also possible the engineer rooted round his tool box and found one that looked right.
It was a 100% maintenance crew failure, the installers of the windscreen didn’t catch their mistake nor did the engineer who inspected it before it was released as airworthy.
 
Yes, the windscreen bolts were to short so not enough grip length for the nuts if l recall correctly. That particular incident is taught as part of the Human Factors in Aviation course in Canada.
The other popular one is the incident where nights were changing leading edge boots IIRC on a high T Tail

Team assigned to left stab got on with job

Day / late Shift manager - had a bit of time so started to remove leading edge bolts then departs having (according to night managers testinmony) told no one and the team on the left stab didnt spot him

Part way through night an issue crops up - so its decided to finish left stab and do the right the following night

The remaining bolts were unable to take the loading - the leading edge ripped off and the aircraft became an uncontrolable lawn dart - killing all on board
 
Early nineties and the main dealer i was working for was trying to gain some sort of EU or iso accreditation.
It was sacked off, as every mechanics toolbox has an invaluable drawer full of random odds and sods.
It turned out that every single part down to a cable tie, or washer would have to have a label attached and be traceable.
 
It was a 100% maintenance crew failure, the installers of the windscreen didn’t catch their mistake nor did the engineer who inspected it before it was released as airworthy.

Wasnt disputing that

My point was that within the context of Dodgy parts - the parts were wrong not faulty or bogus.

The carefully phrased If was to intended to suggest even if on the previous window change - the engineer had ordered the correct parts - and got the wrong ones stores had erred - there was no deliberate criminal act
 
Early nineties and the main dealer i was working for was trying to gain some sort of EU or iso accreditation.
It was sacked off, as every mechanics toolbox has an invaluable drawer full of random odds and sods.
It turned out that every single part down to a cable tie, or washer would have to have a label attached and be traceable.
Only if the toolbox is lay around unlocked
 
The other popular one is the incident where nights were changing leading edge boots IIRC on a high T Tail

Team assigned to left stab got on with job

Day / late Shift manager - had a bit of time so started to remove leading edge bolts then departs having (according to night managers testinmony) told no one and the team on the left stab didnt spot him

Part way through night an issue crops up - so its decided to finish left stab and do the right the following night

The remaining bolts were unable to take the loading - the leading edge ripped off and the aircraft became an uncontrolable lawn dart - killing all on board
Was that the Air Alaska incident?
 
Not cars, or life critical really, but an indicator of how prevalent copying, and piracy is: I was at a large gun show loitering on the Zeiss stand which was manned by a couple of German ex-military snipey type chaps I know. A whole team of around half a dozen Chinese converge on the stand and surround the latest multi-thousand pound telescopic sight developed for military use. One of them whips out a small video camera and goes over every surface of the scope recording it for, presumably, his family album. When he had finished another one whips out something that looked like a hand held laser scanner and did the same...............whilst this was going on I said to my mates, "are you not going to fcek them off"? I was told that there was no point as they would only come back individually, and repetitively until they had what they wanted, and to expect to see knock offs of the item on alibaba within the month.
 
Was that the Air Alaska incident?
quite possibly - long time ago

Edit quick google and no - the Alaska one that comes up is the jack screw - which IIRC was the airline scrimping on maintenance and the nut was litterally stripped off (I didnt read the article just saw jack screw and new it was another incident)

Edit part deux


This incident (although wiki doesnt contain any of the info I mentioned - but does say it was notits 1st flight post maint when it crashed - chalk that to duff memmory)
 
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How is this possible in the days of AS9100? I seem to remember that the windscreen failed on a British Aircraft due to the wrong bolts being used.

Likewise, there are quality standards for automotive parts - TS something or other. I have no specialist knowledge of it, but assume it is not too different to ISO9001 - testing, traceability, record keeping, etc.

That was when pilot Tim Lancaster nearly got sucked out of the cockpit, I think it was a steward who managed to grab his legs. If it was me Id have paneled the **** out of the maintenance crew once I was out of hospital.
 
Yes, the windscreen bolts were to short so not enough grip length for the nuts if l recall correctly. That particular incident is taught as part of the Human Factors in Aviation course in Canada.

Hmm. Done those courses when going for self certification of service and repair of flight instruments at a company.

One that stands out is wrong grease used on elevator of a large pax aircraft (cannot remember type/ year etc. Will google later).
Long story short is nut worked it’s way off elevator control mechanism and pilots left with zero control of elevator.
Pilots flew without control of aircraft for 12mins before aircraft finally fell. Long time to evaluate and fight losing battle…

It’s always a chain of events. In this case wrong grease (If I remember correctly).
 
Hmm. Done those courses when going for self certification of service and repair of flight instruments at a company.

One that stands out is wrong grease used on elevator of a large pax aircraft (cannot remember type/ year etc. Will google later).
Long story short is nut worked it’s way off elevator control mechanism and pilots left with zero control of elevator.
Pilots flew without control of aircraft for 12mins before aircraft finally fell. Long time to evaluate and fight losing battle…

It’s always a chain of events. In this case wrong grease (If I remember correctly).

This one?
 

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