Fairbairn-Sykes For Beginners

#1
I've just been given a new black F-S as a present. The problem is, it's completely blunt! It hasn't even been factory sharpened.

Any advice on how I can sharpen this up?
(I'm only used to using hand-held sharpeners in the kitchen!)
 
#3
Find a proper knife dealer and get it re-ground. Then when it comes back have a look on YouTube for some knife sharpening videos, get a stone and some water and crack on. You'll be shaving with it in no time.
 
#4
It depends if it is a real FS or not, I still have my grandfathers and I keep it sharp. If it's a modern copy it's probably gash.

Agree with the above, get it reground and get yourself a decent sharpening system.
 
#5
I'm sure the issue ones are factory sharpened, then re-blued.

Although why on earth you'd want a FS, let alone a sharp one, for anything other than "Stabbing the Hun" are beyond me.
 
#6
they are still apprantly in the system so if you can get a bored QM to ask for some. you can keep the medical centre amused for some time as they patch toms up who've just discovered how sharp they are :roll: :D
 
#8
(NOWAH)

I thought that the edges were meant to be blunt and only the point very sharp as Fairbairn was keen on stabbing the Hun rather than cutting/slashing him...
 
#10
Well, I'm definitely proficient with the chin jab and tiger's claw - Fairbairn definitely knew his stuff!

(Although I don't get enough opportunity to use the edge of hand blow!)

As for the sharpening, it's about completeness. I'd feel unhappy if the blade just sat there blunt. It would just keep nagging at me.

[Further blade info: it was made by a company simply called "Sheffield" and was purchased from Heinnie Haynes]
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#11
They are still produced by at least one of the original manufacturers, though as I understand it, they are no longer issued to anyone in the forces.

If you have a desperate urge to sharpen it, buy some V80 oil for honing, and a decent multi-grade set of whetstones . . . . oh, and a hot blueing kit to replace what you take off.

Actually, probably best just to leave it if it's new.

Edited to add: aaah fcuk! I've just read the previous post and realised I'be been wahhhed!
sonofab!tch.
 
#12
Biped said:
They are still produced by at least one of the original manufacturers, though as I understand it, they are no longer issued to anyone in the forces.
Just out of curiousity, who were the orginal manufacturers?
I have one stamped-
A Wright & Son
Sheffield
England

Know nothing about it and always assumed its a recent copy
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#13
jagman said:
Biped said:
They are still produced by at least one of the original manufacturers, though as I understand it, they are no longer issued to anyone in the forces.
Just out of curiousity, who were the orginal manufacturers?
I have one stamped-
A Wright & Son
Sheffield
England

Know nothing about it and always assumed its a recent copy
A believe that A Wright & Sons was one, and J Nowill & Sons was/is another. Altogether, I think there were 3 or 4 companies producing these knives. J Nowill & Sons still produce them with the arrow and crossed keys symbols on them.

There's numerous versions out there, most of which are actually legitimate, despite the variance in the hilt design, materials and blade finishes. The ones that have the value of course are those original, original designs issued and used during the war.

Here's a couple of links that might be of mild interest:

Fighting Knives.info

Another site
 
#14
Cheers Biped, much appreciated.
Had it for years and always wondered but never got round to checking (you know how it goes)


Reading the 2nd link, people don't actually pay that kind of money for them do they?
 
#15
Found an original 1st pattern Fairbairn Sykes in my Grandads toolbox a few years back, with the 'S' shaped guard and the scored grip. The only problem was the blade was snapped off halfway up. Much cussing ensued, as for a second i thought i'd hit the jackpot!
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#17
Bugsy said:
Biped said:
J Nowill & Sons still produce them with the arrow and crossed keys symbols on them.
I always thought that the crossed keys signified 2 Div, or do they have another (earlier) meaning?

MsG
The crossed keys in this case is a trademark of John Nowill & Sons (bought by them) from 1842.

The broad arrow is the mark of acceptance, or approval of the blade.

The 'H' inside the diamond next to the broad arrow is the trademark of F.E & J.R.Hopkinson Ltd, established 14 June 1944, which was incorporated by J. Adams Ltd.

Hope that helps. Basically, if you have a J Nowill & Sons, or Hopkinson, or Adams, then you have an original - even if it's new!

Edited to ad: Also the case if it's made by Wilkinson Sword - although they have stopped making them now. They made the SAS Jubilee Commemorative blade in 2001 if I'm not mistaken.
 
#18
I had a FS made by Wilkinson, second pattern with brass knurled hilt.
Had Wilkinson logo and FS just below hilt. This pattern pictured.
Sold it on Ebay for £208 a few years ago.
Certainly was not like the crap sold now.
 

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#19
Divvy_Civvy said:
I've just been given a new black F-S as a present. The problem is, it's completely blunt! It hasn't even been factory sharpened.

Any advice on how I can sharpen this up?
(I'm only used to using hand-held sharpeners in the kitchen!)
Why, on the shinbone of your first kill... of course
 
#20
BenghaziBandit said:
I had a FS made by Wilkinson, second pattern with brass knurled hilt.
Had Wilkinson logo and FS just below hilt. This pattern pictured.
Sold it on Ebay for £208 a few years ago.
Certainly was not like the crap sold now.
My granny had one of those. Nobody ever mugged her for her pension book!
 

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