Failed medical - Appeals process and what else can I do with myself now?

#2
Can you explain why exactly you failed medically? I'm further behind the recruitment process than you and the medical is a worry of mine.

Have you thought about: police or the intelligence services? I know Mi5 are definitely recruiting and Mi6 may be as well. Mi5 do their own tests so I wouldn't worry too much about your qualifications-they'll make their own minds up about whether they want you or not.

There's also the civil service? Although this may be too bureaucratic for your liking and you may end up in an area you have no interest in.
 
#3
you failed, so you can **** off.


of course you could try the search function.

or ask the ACIO

or you could,refer back to my first comment.
 
#5
Hell BrC,
1. I know the square root of very little au sujet de opthalmology, as do most contibutors here, I expect.
2. I do know that if it's a matter of your career, you have to fight the medics right to the end.
3. If you're determined to fight it, seek out an appropriate specialist and give him the brief of challenging the rejection. Be prepared to a) spend some cash and b) accept a finding that agrees with your original report.

Best of

Old Rat
Out
 
#6
Hello,
I recently got my reply informing me I had failed my medical due to my pre-operative refractive error pre-LASEK being too high.
I'm currently figuring out the appeals process - is anyone here familiar with it and can advise?

Secondly, I had my heart set on Sandhurst, as I am sure many here do, but I am now faced with the probability of having to take a separate path, one I had not really done much research into!

Does anyone know of anything in a similar(ish, I know it won't be quite the same!) role I could in the civilian world (public sector)?
My interests were the Royal Signals and Int Corps. Things such as SOCA appear interesting at first glance, but I am not sure if my educational record would be enough to get my foot in the door (average A-Levels, 2:2 degree).

Any advice would be fantastic.

Thanks.
The criteria on refractive errors are quite rigid unfortunately. I expect you'll get nowhere fast with this.
 
#8
Chaps, the intelligence services want a 2.1 degree minimum. GCHQ want the same.
Best get revising then hadnt you. Alternatively why not try the Police for a couple of years, get the experience under your belt and reapply for your 1st (if Int people etc would accept your current academic record combined with Police service).

sent from my sony android gucci thing using sausage fingers and dyslexiacheckspell
 
#9
Best get revising then hadnt you. Alternatively why not try the Police for a couple of years, get the experience under your belt and reapply for your 1st (if Int people etc would accept your current academic record combined with Police service).

sent from my sony android gucci thing using sausage fingers and dyslexiacheckspell
I'm not the OP mate.
 
#10
As “Pyianna” has said the visionary standard required by any branch of the military is very high either one meets that standard or not, there is no in between It would appear you are telling us your sight has refractive errors, yet you decline to tell whether this is either a myopic or hyperopic condition, or astigmatic. From the little information you supply, are we to conclude that you have a corrected astigmatism? Similarly you do not say which form of LASEK surgery you have undergone.

To expect anyone to give you a credible answer without knowing your medical history is almost impossible. The feeling is that you will never be able to fore fill your dream.
 
#12
My brother failed his medical. Was all to do with the fact he had grommits when he was a young lad. He went off to the doctors and they told him he could have an operation to close the hole in his ear, the army then turned around and said just wait 6 months after the Op and re-apply.
 
#14
Ah, right, fine.
Neat font size progression.
But I did say "most" .

Given the OP's last response, do you have a view, advice, experience that's of use to him ( or her) either way?
 
#15
Ah, right, fine.
Neat font size progression.
But I did say "most" .

Given the OP's last response, do you have a view, advice, experience that's of use to him ( or her) either way?
No, sorry. I'm a retired Recy Mech. Does it have a Safe Working Load (SWL) or Working Load Limit (WLL) stamped on the side of the spectacle frame?
 
#16
I know nothing about eyesight standards (except that my jam-jar lens on my left eye isn't think enough to stop me joining) or laser surgery, but I have been through the appeals process.

So...
To appeal you need some kind of mitigation or reason why you think the initial decision was unjustified. For me this was reasonably straightforward, as I had a pretty good case with lots of evidence that I can easily meet the fitness requirements etc.

You need to find a good argument, then back this up as much as possible. In my case I obtained written confirmation from a civvie specialist that I should be fit for military service, amongst other things. Given what you've told us this may be difficult.

When you have as much evidence as possible backing your case, write to the relevant person ('Senior Medical Officer' iirc) at AOSB, enclosing all your notes, letters from specialists etc. As far as I could tell, there isn't a fixed format or anything like that, I just wrote a polite letter stating my case.

In my case the Senior Medical Officer phoned me to discuss my appeal, telling me I had a strong case and that he would back me. I was then referred to an army orthopaedic specialist for a medical, who subsequently passed me as fit to join.

pm me if you want more info, I've been deliberately vague about why I was failed as I'm not entirely comfortable broadcasting why. If your struggling I can show you my letter if I can find a copy
 
#17
I failed my medical at first, just appeal and they will get back to you with an answer. They asks me to do a diary for 6 weeks and approval from GP. Don't let it knock it down. Get back up, appeal and crack on.

Did take me 2 years to get to an actual in date, which I have in July though
 
#18
My brother failed his medical. Was all to do with the fact he had grommits when he was a young lad. He went off to the doctors and they told him he could have an operation to close the hole in his ear, the army then turned around and said just wait 6 months after the Op and re-apply.
I had grommets multiple times. I even had T Tubes. Every time someone looks in my ear they say, 'ooh, that's a lot of scarring.'

I have 1500 hours on Lynx.

Moral of the story, there are less absolutes out there than people claim, and there is a reason this site is called Arrse.
 
#19
The normal thickness of the front of the eye is about half a millimetre. Refractive surgery like LASIK and LASEK and PRK shave the cornea to change the strength of the refraction of the cornea. But it makes it thinner and the greater the pre-op error the more needs to be shaved off.

The question is: at what point does the eyeball become too thin and therefore too weak for military service? The military ophthalmologists have advised that it is linked to the pre-op refraction to give a safe estimate of resultant corneal thickness.

My suggestion is that you get your corneal thickness measured by your eye specialist and send in the result and ask if this is too thin.
 
#20
Thanks - I did something along those lines with my appeal. I sent it off a while back and am waiting to hear back soon. I did fall foul of the requirements initially but it was a well written, well referenced, solid appeal (even if I do say so myself). I could be being slightly optimistic here, but I fancy my chances.
When did you send it off?
 

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