Facebook, Bebo and Myspace.

#1
So I just passed my Int corps selection, I know this sounds like a waaagh but i just need to know the protocols.

When using social networking sites what are the do's and dont's?
Except for the obvious not putting int corp down as you're job, do any of you lads put pics up from winchester or pirtbright? Or even on tour without you're beret? Do you state you're in the armed forces?

I know I'm a twat but we need to compete with the flyboys for the facebook fanny men!
 
#2
The correct form is : "don't go there" you are not competing with anyone, .....there is no competition with the Intelligence Corps.

If you are that insecure and really need the attention then suggest try the Royal Armoured Corps, Royal Horse Artillery, or some other mob with an excellent rugger / rowing team.

Royal Signals still do a good line in sailing I hear and there is always motorcycle display.
 
#3
I dont need the attention. I just like to keep in touch with old friends. I worked hard to get accepted for int corp, im not going to throw it away. If giving up ******* bebo is what it takes then i can accept that.
 
#4
Goony said:
I dont need the attention. I just like to keep in touch with old friends. I worked hard to get accepted for int corp, im not going to throw it away. If giving up * bebo is what it takes then i can accept that.
There's a new innovation out called pen and paper, you can write to these old friends and they in turn can write back. (I think you have to utilise stickers with your bosses face on and magic red boxes that teleport your paper and ink concoctions to your friends.) Modern technology - it's great you know!

Good luck with your career buddy.
 
#5
How about you stay on the site with all your mates, but don´t put anything down to do with work?

By mates, do you mean 500 people you have added to your bebo freinds list or actual, pukka gen mates?
 
#6
Mabe 30 odd family and close friends. I'm not in any way wanting to advertise that im in the int corp, Just keep in touch with close friends in a convenient way. The the argument for letters needs no counter argument to be honest.
 
#7
All we were told was just to be sensible about it! Whether its facebook or someone asking you what you do for a living on a night out etc...just tell them you're in the army. Most people wouldn't have a clue what the Int Corps is anyway, I'm starting basic next week and my family still don't really understand what I'll be doing lol.
 
#8
Scroll forward 20-30 years....

Do you want the photographs and reports to surface just as you enter the promotion zone for RSM, 1* or 2* (delete as necessary)?

If you don't, then don't do it! You're in the Intelligence Corps, FFS. Use your brain.

Litotes
 
#9
Litotes said:
Scroll forward 20-30 years....

Do you want the photographs and reports to surface just as you enter the promotion zone for RSM, 1* or 2* (delete as necessary)?

If you don't, then don't do it! You're in the Intelligence Corps, FFS. Use your brain.

Litotes
They are?...'The Devil is in the detail'. The poster had passed Int Corps Selection....feck I did that........its the nitty pickie DV you have to worry about :D
 
#10
Dont post photos of training, I use facebook and put the odd photo on there, I always set my security settings so only my friends can see my profile and pictures
 
#11
People on here are a little bit paranoid ( some would argue rightly so and others would say it's an antiquated attitude as a legacy from NI and a more apparent threat)

Set your fb settings to private and leave any networks.

Now no-one other than your friends can see your profile. Don't advertise your in the Corps but don't let some of these technophobes get the better of you either.

It's a fine resource for social use and LOTS of guys from the Corps do as you will find.

Common sense is all it takes.

Plus a few photos of raucous nights out shows a healthy social life ;)

Just don't be one of those tw*ts that 'takes photos just for facebook'!!! :)
 
#13
The BBC programme "Click" did an an investigation. They were saying that Facebook put its members security at risk by using third-party applications for its games and quizzes. It demonstrated that, if one of your Facebook "friends" (not you) used one of these applications, sufficient information might be obtained about YOU to put you at risk of identity theft ...... regardless of your privacy settings. In contrast, My Space use applications that run on its own servers. So avoid giving any information about yourself.

Further information on an arrse thread I started here.
 
#14
Dontdreamit said:
People on here are a little bit paranoid ( some would argue rightly so and others would say it's an antiquated attitude as a legacy from NI and a more apparent threat)

Set your fb settings to private and leave any networks.

Now no-one other than your friends can see your profile. Don't advertise your in the Corps but don't let some of these technophobes get the better of you either.

It's a fine resource for social use and LOTS of guys from the Corps do as you will find.

Common sense is all it takes.

Plus a few photos of raucous nights out shows a healthy social life ;)

Just don't be one of those tw*ts that 'takes photos just for facebook'!!! :)
I agree with Dontdreamit, weigh the threat against yourself against the possibility of the personal info being compromised. I understand that some people have a public and a private profile, so that work related colleagues can see you being responsible and employable, whilst your other profile (all social networks abhor 2nd profiles by the way) being (ahem) yourself.

Oh, and don't post when you have been drinking, I fell foul of that once :oops:
 
#15
Thanks for the advice lads. I always intended to continue using facebook, I just wanted to ensure I wasnt endagering myself or ruining my chances of a future career. Bit of common sense it is. Many thanks Dontdreamit.
 
#16
I posted something similar before. I know quite a few of the old and bold place a high emphasis on PERSEC and I obviously they had reason to because the threat in NI was much more apparent but on the whole, the internet and cyberculture is a way of life. It is here to stay and will factor into a lot of modern living.

Obviously it has inherent risks (and more will appear) but that is life. At the end of the day you have to weigh up enjoying your life with being safe.

The truth is, I DON'T vary my routes to work, I DO hang my uniform on the washing line and yes I sometimes pop to the supermarket on the way home from work in my greens.

On the flip side I do read the threat levels, keep an eye out in my street and educate my self about my online presence.

It's ying and yang :) and you can find your own safety level.
 
#17
oh and don't post a full-face picture of yourself sat in your office, in your uniform complete with beret, describing yourself as a counter-intelligence professional. :roll:
 
#19
Dontdreamit said:
I posted something similar before. I know quite a few of the old and bold place a high emphasis on PERSEC and I obviously they had reason to because the threat in NI was much more apparent but on the whole, the internet and cyberculture is a way of life. It is here to stay and will factor into a lot of modern living.

Obviously it has inherent risks (and more will appear) but that is life. At the end of the day you have to weigh up enjoying your life with being safe.

The truth is, I DON'T vary my routes to work, I DO hang my uniform on the washing line and yes I sometimes pop to the supermarket on the way home from work in my greens.

On the flip side I do read the threat levels, keep an eye out in my street and educate my self about my online presence.

It's ying and yang :) and you can find your own safety level.
Probably fine if your name is more common than Smudge Smith and you are never going to rise above Cpl.

However, if your name is unusual or you plan on a full career in the Services, Security Services or in public life, I reckon it would be unwise to place anything other than minimal information on the web about yourself. You should consider that everything published on the web will still be there in one form or another in 20 year's time.

Look how information from the past has haunted politicians like Jacqui Smith, the Home Secretary, who reportedly smoked cannabis in her youth (but she didn't inhale, reportedly). And would Dave have posed for that famous picture had he realised that it would play right into the hands of his future political enemies - for ever?

And both of those instances are from before the Web! Today, the Web is only about 10 years old for most people and is still a novelty in some circles. Most people don't know how their information is stored and disseminated across the Web, and the sad thing is that most people fail to understand how much information can be gleaned from the Web by anyone with a little time and imagination.

I knew someone who croaked a while ago under "newsworthy" conditions. The gutter press trawled the Web, found several bits of information and cobbled the stories together without any thought as to whether they were accurate or not - and the facts they found were old and weren't even relevant to his death, but were highly distressing to his family.

In summary, don't post anything to the Web about yourself that you wouldn't want your current boss, any future bosses, the Sun, any future spouse(s) or your future grandchildren to read!

As for me? Well, I don't exist... and even my neighbours don't know that I may, or may not be, a bedding storeman in the Army.

Litotes
 
#20
And both of those instances are from before the Web! Today, the Web is only about 10 years old for most people and is still a novelty in some circles. Most people don't know how their information is stored and disseminated across the Web, and the sad thing is that most people fail to understand how much information can be gleaned from the Web by anyone with a little time and imagination.
Def in agreement - the control of information is a huge talking point in tech circles.

Who has access, how is stored, assurance of deletion etc etc.

Google has recently unveiled it's Total Connectivity strategy. Basically all of your social profiles are linked into an individual profile which will update various sites when you chnage it. Matter of time until it links in to Google Maps, Email blah blah..

Did you know certain supermarkets in Europe have RFID chips which monitor your loyalty card so they can analyse which aisles and products you stop at and which you pass over?

It's getting scary!
 
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