Fablonned biff chit for flying

#1
It's something I keep meaning to do, if nothing else, for acedemic interest. I have a screwed back, knees, and ankles and wondered whether a doctor's note stating I'm a cripple would make a blind bit of difference to the seats/upgrades/hospitality I don't currently enjoy on most flights.

Normally it's not a problem, but on long haul flights when there are no good seats left I sometimes emerge from the plane barely able to walk normally.

Does anyone have experience of using a biff chit with an airline? (Incidentally, I don't want the wheel chair treatment because then you are last to leave the plane :) )
 
#2
You sound like you want your cake and eat it, why don't you pay to upgrade like everybody else? Bet you never did any phys when you served hence "fabloned biff chit"
 
#3
buryfc66 said:
You sound like you want your cake and eat it, why don't you pay to upgrade like everybody else? Bet you never did any phys when you served hence "fabloned biff chit"
Are we to assume that if offered an upgrade you would refuse?


When you chew your own liver, does it taste of bitterness?
 
#4
Techtechtech said:
buryfc66 said:
You sound like you want your cake and eat it, why don't you pay to upgrade like everybody else? Bet you never did any phys when you served hence "fabloned biff chit"
Are we to assume that if offered an upgrade you would refuse?


When you chew your own liver, does it taste of bitterness?
Bitter? me? never, just pains me to see people using the "fabloned biff chit" to get stuff that he could otherwise pay for himself, like most people. But the bit which winds me up the most was the "I don't want the wheel chair treatment because then you are last to leave the plane", talk about wanting your cake and eat it.

And who are you? his spokesperson?
 
#5
There is ,strangely enough, an EEC regulation on this for all flights leaving or terminating in Europe which governs this. There is an information leaflet which is produced by the Equal Opportunities Commissison mainly aimed at the disabled but does cover other conditions

Oh and by the way when Thai upgraded me for running over my foot with a baggage machine I went wheel chair from check in at HKT to the taxi rank at LHR. I recommend it as I jumped every queue, no waiting to immmigration, baggage or security checks.
 
#6
buryfc66 said:
Techtechtech said:
buryfc66 said:
You sound like you want your cake and eat it, why don't you pay to upgrade like everybody else? Bet you never did any phys when you served hence "fabloned biff chit"
Are we to assume that if offered an upgrade you would refuse?


When you chew your own liver, does it taste of bitterness?
Bitter? me? never, just pains me to see people using the "fabloned biff chit" to get stuff that he could otherwise pay for himself, like most people. But the bit which winds me up the most was the "I don't want the wheel chair treatment because then you are last to leave the plane", talk about wanting your cake and eat it.

And who are you? his spokesperson?
Okay, I'll bite :)

I was champion P Coy recruit in 1988 and my name was up on the boards in the gym in Browning Barracks for best BFT time, best Steeplechase time, and best Assault Course time. I could put in 7.40min BFTs when I was in the Army. What phys did you do in the Army BuryFC?

Of course I want to have my cake and eat it. What fool wouldn't? Only a bloody idiot would stoically sit in a chair designed for dwarves next to the toilets at the back of the plane when there is a legitimate and reasonable way of getting a seat that won't result in one emerging from the plane looking like Quasimodo. And why would I want the wheelchair treatment if I don't need it and it results in greater hassle?

@ Jarrod:

Fair one :D I normally fly business class, so no problem, but when flying at short notice on busy routes there are often no seats left in business on the routes I fly.

@ Retd_crab

Thanks for that - I'll take a look. If it's not applicable to me I'll resort to throwing myself in front of baggage machines 8O
 
#7
Oyibo said:
It's something I keep meaning to do, if nothing else, for acedemic interest. I have a screwed back, knees, and ankles and wondered whether a doctor's note stating I'm a cripple would make a blind bit of difference to the seats/upgrades/hospitality I don't currently enjoy on most flights.

Normally it's not a problem, but on long haul flights when there are no good seats left I sometimes emerge from the plane barely able to walk normally.

Does anyone have experience of using a biff chit with an airline? (Incidentally, I don't want the wheel chair treatment because then you are last to leave the plane :) )
What they will do is give you a seat well away from any of the emergency exits so that you don't hold up the evacuation of the aircraft in the event of an emergency.
 
#8
Because I didn't know the Norwegian for 'These seats are reserved for biffs and women who are up the duff' I found myself a seat in a conveniently empty row. It was right up the front of the aircraft and close to the driver.

Though not too close.
 
#9
eodmatt said:
Oyibo said:
It's something I keep meaning to do, if nothing else, for acedemic interest. I have a screwed back, knees, and ankles and wondered whether a doctor's note stating I'm a cripple would make a blind bit of difference to the seats/upgrades/hospitality I don't currently enjoy on most flights.

Normally it's not a problem, but on long haul flights when there are no good seats left I sometimes emerge from the plane barely able to walk normally.

Does anyone have experience of using a biff chit with an airline? (Incidentally, I don't want the wheel chair treatment because then you are last to leave the plane :) )
What they will do is give you a seat well away from any of the emergency exits so that you don't hold up the evacuation of the aircraft in the event of an emergency.
Fair one. That's probably the reality of what would happen :(
 
#10
I know it for a fact, cos I tried it on once when I had a pulled muscle in my thigh and having given them the sob story, found myself right at the back next to the bog.
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#11
mistersoft said:
Because I didn't know the Norwegian for 'These seats are reserved for biffs and women who are up the duff' I found myself a seat in a conveniently empty row. It was right up the front of the aircraft and close to the driver.

Though not too close.
Your reputation clearly precedes you. At least as far as Norway.
 
#12
cloudbuster said:
mistersoft said:
Because I didn't know the Norwegian for 'These seats are reserved for biffs and women who are up the duff' I found myself a seat in a conveniently empty row. It was right up the front of the aircraft and close to the driver.

Though not too close.
Your reputation clearly precedes you. At least as far as Norway.
:lol:

So it would seem. I wondered why I was getting funny looks.

Or more than usual.
 
#13
mistersoft said:
cloudbuster said:
mistersoft said:
Because I didn't know the Norwegian for 'These seats are reserved for biffs and women who are up the duff' I found myself a seat in a conveniently empty row. It was right up the front of the aircraft and close to the driver.

Though not too close.
Your reputation clearly precedes you. At least as far as Norway.
:lol:

So it would seem. I wondered why I was getting funny looks.

Or more than usual.
From people using binoculars, obviously :lol:
 
#14
On BA and Virgin there are bulk head seats which are reserved for people who struggle for mobility. They have the advantage of not having the seat in front of you reclined into your face after the first meal.

You have a little extra leg room, and it is easier to get past your neighbours to stretch your legs.
 
#15
ooooh_matron said:
On BA and Virgin there are bulk head seats which are reserved for people who struggle for mobility. They have the advantage of not having the seat in front of you reclined into your face after the first meal.

You have a little extra leg room, and it is easier to get past your neighbours to stretch your legs.
Thanks OM - useful to know. The bulkhead seats are almost invariably better in cattle class unless there's a screaming 6 month old gremlin in one of those cots that fix onto the wall.

The only down side is that if you are on an empty flight you cannot lift up the armrests to lie down. (But if it's an empty flight you just take another row :sleepy: )
 
#16
Oyibo said:
ooooh_matron said:
On BA and Virgin there are bulk head seats which are reserved for people who struggle for mobility. They have the advantage of not having the seat in front of you reclined into your face after the first meal.

You have a little extra leg room, and it is easier to get past your neighbours to stretch your legs.
Thanks OM - useful to know. The bulkhead seats are almost invariably better in cattle class unless there's a screaming 6 month old gremlin in one of those cots that fix onto the wall.

The only down side is that if you are on an empty flight you cannot lift up the armrests to lie down. (But if it's an empty flight you just take another row :sleepy: )
Even if you haven't got away with booking the bulkhead seat, it is worth talking to the steward/stewardess who is looking after you section, and ask if they wouldn't mind moving you to any bulk seat not occupied once they have finished boarding.
 
#17
Oyibo,

Most airlines will allow internet check-in, usually beginning 24-30 hours before departure. There's usually an option to change the seat they have allocated to one with a little more leg room.
Check out this site for a few tips, for example, seats at the front of the section (behind the bulkhead) have more legroom, but are narrower, as the tables fold into the arms, etc

http://www.seatguru.com/
 
#18
ooooh_matron said:
Even if you haven't got away with booking the bulkhead seat, it is worth talking to the steward/stewardess who is looking after you section, and ask if they wouldn't mind moving you to any bulk seat not occupied once they have finished boarding.
Agreed - If I'm in cattle I almost invariably do that when they say "cabin crew: cross check and arm the doors" (or words to that effect). I've yet to encounter any cabin crew who have a problem with that. For that matter, I have found that politeness to cabin crew invariably goes a long way - How many times have you seen a stroppy complaining twat in cattle be upgraded?

I fly a lot and I'm at the stage where anything, within reason, that can make the flight more comfortable should be explored. As the cliche goes, 'any fool can be uncomfortable'.
 
#19
Quick update on good seats - I'm in Cape Town about to fly to Schipol (KLM). Asked for an emergency exit seat - "70 squids sucker"! A seat with a bit more leg room? "25 nicker". A one way upgrade to business (this is a flight paid for by me)? 2000 of your rapidly depreciating pounds please Mr Easy.

FFS. The flight is empty and they want to charge that? Looks like I'll be getting a lie-flat bed in cattle when I throw up the armrests and snore like a pregnant sow.
 
#20
Point taken roadster, but I fly on average 3 times a month on medium haul flights (+/- 2000 miles per flight, at least one a month over 4000) and I have been doing so for the past 8 years. I have a Kryptonite Card for DVT and SAA. I've had every SAA Card except 'Lifetime Platinum', but to be frank, they aint worth shit. Well that's SAA, but friends and colleagues with similar BA, KLM, Air France etc cards tell the same story.

When I asked about an airmiles upgrade the two people behind the counter laughed out loud (it's Africa)- and I had to join in, in appreciating the sheer futility of it all.

As it happens, I'm flying the missus business on Emirates to CDG in July, and her ticket is cheaper than it would cost me to upgrade from CPT to AMS one way.

(Edited for mongness, whisky, and fat fingers)
 
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