F35 - Money well spent.

A pragmatic, if deeply unpalatable, decision by the USMC, and doesn't bode well for future operating costs.

'An F-35B that erupted into flames after a faulty bracket issue nearly two years ago has been struck by the Marine Corps, making it the first loss of an F-35 for the Corps. The Corps made the determination that the costs to repair the costly high-tech fighter would not be worth the return on investment. However, the Marines have not put out an official strike message for the F-35B because the Corps has not decided whether the aircraft will be used as a trainer for maintenance or a museum centerpiece.'

The Marine Corps has lost its first F-35
 
A pragmatic, if deeply unpalatable, decision by the USMC, and doesn't bode well for future operating costs...
Why?

My understanding is that the technical issue with the bracket has been addressed. Operating costs are already falling which is to be expected as the fleet size grows (although I suspect that they'll still be high overall). Longer term I doubt that F-35 losses will exceed those for other single-engine types.

Regards,
MM
 
That it has taken the USMC the better part of 2 years from the incident to decide that the aircraft is Cat.5, and yet is apparently complete enough to be considered for use either as an instructional airframe or museum piece (and I'm assuming the latter would not be in a condition similar to the RAFM's Gladiator).
 
It will be particularly fascinating if the US decides to seize the now Turkish planes to prevent their NATO allies the Turks from flying their own aircraft back to their own country.

That Rubicon however has yet to be crossed.
It's not as if the USA doesn't have previous form on this, albeit not with a NATO ally.

'The U.S.-Pakistan F-16 fiasco'

'When the Pressler sanctions came into force, Pakistan was precluded from taking possession of 28 F-16s for which it had made payments until 1993, some three years after the sanctions commenced. Pakistan paid the Lockheed Corp. $658 million for the planes, and some reports suggest that Pakistan continued making payments based on Pentagon assurances that continued payments would ensure eventual delivery. Pakistan did not get the planes and was assessed storage and maintenance costs of $50,000 per month for the planes that sat, becoming ever more obsolete, in the Arizona desert.'

The U.S.-Pakistan F-16 fiasco
 
That it has taken the USMC the better part of 2 years from the incident to decide that the aircraft is Cat.5, and yet is apparently complete enough to be considered for use either as an instructional airframe or museum piece (and I'm assuming the latter would not be in a condition similar to the RAFM's Gladiator).
That's pretty much the timeline I'd expect to conduct the flight safety investigation, engage with industry so that the latter can assess the damage and provide quotes for the rectification. Most accident reports alone take around 2 years for publication and I seem to recall that there was a similar timescale for the Typhoon wheels-up at China Lake before it was struck off and returned home.

Regards,
MM
 
And the Nesher.
IAI Nesher - Wikipedia

Have balls, will survive.

But...got to have a bit of nouse as well.
'According to official accounts, Israel had already obtained a complete set of drawings and detailed information prior to the embargoes enactment.' If I recall correctly, with collusion from some inside Dassault.

Stealing plans and stealing planes are rather different orders of difficulty!
 
Stealing plans and stealing planes are rather different orders of difficulty!
They are indeed, and your point made.
Pakistan paid the Lockheed Corp. $658 million for the planes, and some reports suggest that Pakistan continued making payments based on Pentagon assurances that continued payments would ensure eventual delivery. Pakistan did not get the planes and was assessed storage and maintenance costs of $50,000 per month for the planes that sat, becoming ever more obsolete, in the Arizona desert.'
Paid from Military aid given to Pakistan by the USA.
 
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A pragmatic, if deeply unpalatable, decision by the USMC, and doesn't bode well for future operating costs.

'An F-35B that erupted into flames after a faulty bracket issue nearly two years ago has been struck by the Marine Corps, making it the first loss of an F-35 for the Corps. The Corps made the determination that the costs to repair the costly high-tech fighter would not be worth the return on investment. However, the Marines have not put out an official strike message for the F-35B because the Corps has not decided whether the aircraft will be used as a trainer for maintenance or a museum centerpiece.'

The Marine Corps has lost its first F-35
Without boring the world to death, I assume that warranty of an experimental development aircraft is not offered by LM but what level of Insurance (if any) covers this??
 
Although there have previously been statements that 5th Gen technology wouldn't be offered to Arab countries, that approach appears to be softening. In the Region, I'd say the UAE are the most likely to get F-35 as they're relatively stable, trusted and already enjoy access to some pretty high-end US kit.

Without boring the world to death, I assume that warranty of an experimental development aircraft is not offered by LM but what level of Insurance (if any) covers this??
Almost certainly none.

Regards,
MM
 
I think the F-35 (all versions) has been more extensively tested and benefited from far greater use of modelling and simulation than previous aircraft - which can only be good in terms of reliability and knowing how the beast handles in difficult conditions.

Talking of testing: F-35 shipped via Hull

Good to see the Aerospace and Marine sectors working together.
 
I think the F-35 (all versions) has been more extensively tested and benefited from far greater use of modelling and simulation than previous aircraft - which can only be good in terms of reliability and knowing how the beast handles in difficult conditions.

Talking of testing: F-35 shipped via Hull

Good to see the Aerospace and Marine sectors working together.
Interesting link, I was sailing Thursday at the bottom of the Brough runway but can't see how they moved the F35 by barge unless they have recently built a terminal there.
 
In a further expansion of F-35 capabilities the Gremlin project is now into Phase 3. The Unmanned Aerial Systems are a force-multiplier, leveraging the strengths of both manned and unmanned systems by providing manned aircraft pilots with the ability to take full advantage of the UAS intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities.

This will significantly improves safety and decision-making in "complex, contested missions." giving the ability for a single, manned aircraft to stand off from danger, and overwhelm an adversary continuously with multiple volleys of these systems "while managing multiple air vehicles equipped with sensors and other payloads, greatly expanding its ability in the support of tactical strike, reconnaissance/surveillance and close air support missions.

The drone has taken on an increasingly important role in enhancing combat capability but with multiple operators managing a singly highly complex and expensive weapon system. The Gremlin project is switching to a cheaper re-usable multiple air launched system managed by a single operator that is carried clandestinely within a stealth vehicle close to the threat before being lauched to perform various tasks before then being recovered for anlysis and re-use.

Small low cost high capability drones with swarm capability can be launched from F-22 and F-35’s which can get extremely close undetected to enemy defences, do their missions then return to a receiver aircraft deploying a "towed, stabilised capture device" below and away from the host aircraft.

The air vehicles dock with the device in a similar fashion to an airborne refuelling operation. Once docked and powered off, the air vehicles then raised to the receiver aircraft where it is mechanically secured and stowed.

Dynetics states that the key technologies for retrieval can be "straightforwardly adapted" to allow "under-wing recovery and bay recovery" by various cargo aircraft.

The F-35’s that are now being deployed by both US and allied air forces are already formidable force multipliers for their present 4th Gen air assets, ‘Gremlins' will be yet another facet of it’s already huge multi-role capabilities.
Dynetics Selected For Demonstration Phase Of Darpas Gremlins Program

 
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I think I see a problem in that statement...
I think you possibly might agree that a Gremlin drone might just be less costly...and possibly more effective...when paired with a system such as an F-22 or an F-35... than a Grey Eagle, Predator, Gobal Hawk or any of the latest and greatest ...along with their support and operating systems and personnel.

And if you didn’t, then there are an awful lot of people pumping billions of dollars into research that thinks that it will.
 
Do the Russians do AS9100 and ISO9001 in the same way every Western component manufacturer, let alone OEMs and major contractors, does?

Why did they place the order for the four Mistral LHDs with a French yard?
 

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