F*ck me !

Surprised this hasn’t been posted already. I think on previous outings it was identified as an Argentinian jet (the second one in this compilation).
I quite like the momentary confusion on the guys’ faces as they simultaneously shit themselves and realise that they are still alive.
 
Are you implying that it was swept under the carpet? It wasn't. A number of careers came to a shuddering halt asa result of some very high profile inquiries.
Indeed- and it helped contribute to Lyneham getting a Tornado GR1 pilot as the staish (thereby aiding his slightly unlikely ascent to 2*. ‘Only me!’....)

There are various tales out there about individuals whose careers came to a crashing halt, or stalled badly enough to change their previously-assumed career trajectory, but I’ve heard several of them 2nd hand so won’t repeat them. And the one I do know about (who was less of an arrse) rehabilitated himself in the eyes of the service and did get to command, albeit a sadder, wiser and much more sensible man.
 
Are you implying that it was swept under the carpet? It wasn't. A number of careers came to a shuddering halt asa result of some very high profile inquiries.
Indeed they did.

And if my trusted source at the time, a Lyneham QFI is to be believed, a fair few didn’t.

And the young lad lived to a ripe old age having come back to life.
 

syrup

LE
Surprised this hasn’t been posted already. I think on previous outings it was identified as an Argentinian jet (the second one in this compilation).
I quite like the momentary confusion on the guys’ faces as they simultaneously shit themselves and realise that they are still alive.

Doing it for real in the Falklands attacking HMS Broadsword




And reportedly in Ajax Bay

 
Indeed- and it helped contribute to Lyneham getting a Tornado GR1 pilot as the staish (thereby aiding his slightly unlikely ascent to 2*. ‘Only me!’....)

There are various tales out there about individuals whose careers came to a crashing halt, or stalled badly enough to change their previously-assumed career trajectory, but I’ve heard several of them 2nd hand so won’t repeat them. And the one I do know about (who was less of an arrse) rehabilitated himself in the eyes of the service and did get to command, albeit a sadder, wiser and much more sensible man.
I had a slightly peripheral involvement in a subsequent investigation, but in this (and some of the other inquiries), much of the evidence was anecdotal and couldn't be corroborated.
 
Indeed they did.

And if my trusted source at the time, a Lyneham QFI is to be believed, a fair few didn’t.

And the young lad lived to a ripe old age having come back to life.
As F-c says, it wasn't so much sweeping under the carpet as finding it difficult to nail down the evidence to do them over legitimately. The pilot was charged with manslaughter, but acquitted. The RAF promptly binned him, and IIRC, there was some mewling in the press from his wife (or a relation) about how the RAF had been quite unfair, that his name had been cleared in court, etc, etc, but the complainant was advised to find out where 'sympathy' is located in the dictionary.

The various accounts I've heard suggest that the RAF exacted a degree of summary justice on the quiet with the most egregious offenders, but either couldn't get firm evidence (I know of a couple who were effectively told they'd got lucky this time, but they were being watched, and screw up even slightly, and CAS would have them grounded before the day was out - assuming that the AOC hadn't binned them in the interim) or had to give the benefit of the doubt. The appointment of a non-AT station commander in 2002 was viewed in some quarters as a sign that their Airships were not happy that all had been sorted out; it caused some angst in the Hercules world. I think that I'm right in saying that the careers of at least one of the station commanders who were in harness at the time of the misbehaviour (being diplomatic) which culminated in Christopher Game's death ended rather less sparklingly than had been predicted (even allowing for the fact that they were from the AT world and not going to end up as CAS).
 
RAF Herc pilot showing how they like to attack people standing on stuff

This photo has been around for a while, a composite of two photos taken at Port Stanley. I can't remember if it's Photoshopped or a composite print of two negatives, but it's not real. The guy shaking his fist is doing so at the two guys on the roof of the Station Medical Centre. If you look at the three people in the photo none of them are paying any attention to a Herc that's probably only 20 feet above their heads. They must be blind and deaf ;)
 
Another reporter got even nearer to a low flier:

 
He's behind yooooouuuuuu....



That's an Azeri one, but there is an anecdote about a Soviet Mi-24 in Afghanistan that attacked a group of Mujihadeen with the nose after the gunner ran out of 12.7x108.
 
In fairness, even the Reds started to get a sense that they might have been pushing their luck a bit
We went to see the Reds when we were living in Edinburgh, in 1971 or so. I was five or six, and was sitting on Dad's shoulders; I can just remember them arriving bloody low over the crowd from behind... Surprise! (none of that namby-pamby "well clear of the crowd line" rubbish, I was looking straight up at a Gnat).

Dad described really wanting to duck, but not being able to because of having me on his shoulders...
 
1971 was the year they lost four of the team in a mid-air, in early January. Two new team members were being shown the ropes by two of the established team members and something went wrong when they were carrying out one of the Synchro manoeuvres and the two aircraft hit one another; because of the deaths and the medical downgrading of one of the other pilots, they flew the '71 season as a seven-ship. They'd had six other flying accidents in the previous two years and lost six airframes, although only one was directly related to training for a display - the losses had mainly been the result of a technical failure and bad luck (two aircraft lost in 1969 when a miscommunication led to Red 4 ejecting after he'd been told his aircraft was ablaze; sadly, it was Red 8's - he ejected as well; one aircraft lost when it had an engine failure, the pilot - Red 1 - got it back to Kemble but had to abort a landing because a couple of Gnats from Valley had arrived just beforehand - he had to leave via the office furniture as well.

The problem was the impression this created, particularly when Red 1's accident left him with a broken leg and needing replacement, and this was the point where the feeling that the team perhaps needed an outsider to come in and to just slightly tone things down a little started to gain clarity.
 

Alamo

LE
As F-c says, it wasn't so much sweeping under the carpet as finding it difficult to nail down the evidence to do them over legitimately. The pilot was charged with manslaughter, but acquitted. The RAF promptly binned him, and IIRC, there was some mewling in the press from his wife (or a relation) about how the RAF had been quite unfair, that his name had been cleared in court, etc, etc, but the complainant was advised to find out where 'sympathy' is located in the dictionary.

The various accounts I've heard suggest that the RAF exacted a degree of summary justice on the quiet with the most egregious offenders, but either couldn't get firm evidence (I know of a couple who were effectively told they'd got lucky this time, but they were being watched, and screw up even slightly, and CAS would have them grounded before the day was out - assuming that the AOC hadn't binned them in the interim) or had to give the benefit of the doubt. The appointment of a non-AT station commander in 2002 was viewed in some quarters as a sign that their Airships were not happy that all had been sorted out; it caused some angst in the Hercules world. I think that I'm right in saying that the careers of at least one of the station commanders who were in harness at the time of the misbehaviour (being diplomatic) which culminated in Christopher Game's death ended rather less sparklingly than had been predicted (even allowing for the fact that they were from the AT world and not going to end up as CAS).
One of the consequences was that a whole draft of FJ-streamed trainee pilots were sent to the C130 fleet. One of the considerations during investigations had been along the lines of ‘is it a factor that the AT fleet never gets the top trainees?’ I don’t see that there should be any causal link, but this was around the time that CRM and human factors were gaining in significance.
 

Alamo

LE
In fairness, even the Reds started to get a sense that they might have been pushing their luck a bit; the late Sir Peter Squire - the forgotten Red 1 - was appointed to command the team in early 1973 after being a successful aerobatic pilot while a QFI at Valley. He didn't want the job and initially turned it down; he was then invited by the Air Secretary to reconsider and promised an operational job of his choice once the tour ended.

He was appointed to impose a degree of discipline upon the team because he had no past experience as a Reds member (as above, he was a CFS Hunter display pilot) and was likely to calm them down. The team twigged this and were very wary about him. The 1973 fuel crisis meant that training was curtailed; the Reds were told that they were not to be seen to practice and had to do their training above cloud (next to pointless), and although Squire won the team round (unsurprisingly as it was Peter Squire) he went to the Commandant of CFS and told him that he wasn't going to be ready to lead the team by the deadline of the 1974 Farnborough show.

Ian Dick (the boss for the 1971, '72 and '73 seasons) was brought back, but the shows that year were a little less gung-ho.

(Peter Squire went off to 5 Bde, swapping places with Ian Dick, and then onto Harriers. Where he did rather well for himself...)
I was Peter Squire’s ADC. He never talked about his time with the Reds.
 
I was Peter Squire’s ADC. He never talked about his time with the Reds.
I believe the first time he went into any detail was when he did an interview for the IWM. The only other record of him seems to be a photo which appeared in Flight shortly after he'd taken over when he attended some dinner or event, and was captioned as the new leader (or something like that - the archive isn't online any more)
 

Alamo

LE
The appointment of a non-AT station commander in 2002 was viewed in some quarters as a sign that their Airships were not happy that all had been sorted out; it caused some angst in the Hercules world. I think that I'm right in saying that the careers of at least one of the station commanders who were in harness at the time of the misbehaviour (being diplomatic) which culminated in Christopher Game's death ended rather less sparklingly than had been predicted (even allowing for the fact that they were from the AT world and not going to end up as CAS).
Not forgetting the late-90s fun with captains jumping out the back with the Blades!
 
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