Extinction Rebellion protesters - what to do?

Chef

LE
That needs to be "and" not "or" at the end of a). The reason PT isn't so popular is because it costs more than the drive,
Edited for brevity.

With my government head on I say there is no need for an 'or' at all. I just keep making private motoring such a costly balls ache that you'll be grateful for any form of transport no matter how expensive or unreliable it is.

Eventually London will be a nicer quieter place and the rich will continue to motor in or use taxis. The £100 a day it costs will be written off against taxes or just not noticed.*

I, of course, will continue to use ministry pool cars.

So no 'and' about it.

*There was an Edinburgh lawyer who happily coughed up £70 a day in parking tickets in order to park outside their office.
 

NSP

LE
Git.
 
I lived in Osnabruck in Germany about 25 years ago, back in those day - all the bus stops would tell you via digital display how long it was until the next bus was coming. The buses were always on time as well and were reliable and cheap. The trains were spacious with lots of leg room and never late.

Here in Scotland - quarter of a century later, things where I live haven't changed much and are probably worse that they were about 40 years ago public transport wise.... lets face it, we live in a shit country and haven't modernised much at all in the last 50 or so years. The roads are still crap, there's bugger all new motorways in Scotland - if I want to go somewhere by train (Inverness or somewhere up north - it takes many hours and lots of changes to do that). Transport in Scotland is crap - you even get charged more for postage because of this.
Thank god we are leaving the EU - now we can spend the tax payers money in this country instead of paying for projects in Italy that are run and skimmed off by the Mafia.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
I lived in Osnabruck in Germany about 25 years ago, back in those day - all the bus stops would tell you via digital display how long it was until the next bus was coming. The buses were always on time as well and were reliable and cheap. The trains were spacious with lots of leg room and never late.

Here in Scotland - quarter of a century later, things where I live haven't changed much and are probably worse that they were about 40 years ago public transport wise.... lets face it, we live in a shit country and haven't modernised much at all in the last 50 or so years. The roads are still crap, there's bugger all new motorways in Scotland - if I want to go somewhere by train (Inverness or somewhere up north - it takes many hours and lots of changes to do that). Transport in Scotland is crap - you even get charged more for postage because of this.
Thank god we are leaving the EU - now we can spend the tax payers money in this country instead of paying for projects in Italy that are run and skimmed off by the Mafia.
How long have you voted for the SNP ?
 
How long have you voted for the SNP ?
Never have - never will either. I'm a Brexiteer and and Unionist. God Save the Queen.
My allegiance is to the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland, and to the British People & the Commonwealth.
 
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I drove from Montrose to Taunton last week. I put £88 in the tank - which could have been less if I'd not torn the arse out of it once I was clear of Scotlands love-in with average speed cameras on principle routes - and the company paid £85 for the car hire (SUV). It took me nine hours with stops for a pee and refuelling. The tank wasn't full at the start, either, as it had been brought up from Dundee for the drop-off at the ship.

The train - cheapest option: £243, change three times, taxis at each end coming to around £25, seventeen hours, rubbing shoulders with potential virus carriers. quickest option: £310, sit on the platform in Edinburgh for 2.5hrs, twelve hours total, plus the taxis and the risk. And that's all if it goes to plan.

Even on a good day, in the absence of flights, which would be my normal transport for that journey, you're not getting me out of the car and onto PT.

It's the same at the micro-level - there's a bus every two hours from my village into town. The return fare is more than what my car uses in petrol to get there and back with two hours in the multistory thrown in. On top of that, the bus goes to the town centre, not anywhere near the supermarkets or other warehouse stores - and who wants to carry a months groceries for him, her and 2.4 bogglins on the bus anyway?
I used to get the train into London to go visit Kew.
Train: cycle to local train station, Train to Kew, walk to site, and return via the same route. Would easy cost £35, with about four changes, and take 3-4 hours. One day I did it in summer and was crammed into a standing only train carriage, dripping with sweat. The trip earlier there had been a half hour of abuse by a gang of oiks on the London underground to contend with.

Car: 2 hours in air conditioned glory, on some nice roads (M1 is fairly Ok, M25 can be a bitch, then the M4, which is brilliant coming out of London). Cost about the same, if not less, in fuel. Go at the weekend no congestion charge. I can also leave and arrive when I want, so if the documents aren't playing nice I can sack it in.

I've moved further north now, so it'll cost a lot extra, but I'll still drive. It's not even a question.
 

Chef

LE
I used to get the train into London to go visit Kew.
Train: cycle to local train station, Train to Kew, walk to site, and return via the same route. Would easy cost £35, with about four changes, and take 3-4 hours. One day I did it in summer and was crammed into a standing only train carriage, dripping with sweat. The trip earlier there had been a half hour of abuse by a gang of oiks on the London underground to contend with.

Car: 2 hours in air conditioned glory, on some nice roads (M1 is fairly Ok, M25 can be a bitch, then the M4, which is brilliant coming out of London). Cost about the same, if not less, in fuel. Go at the weekend no congestion charge. I can also leave and arrive when I want, so if the documents aren't playing nice I can sack it in.

I've moved further north now, so it'll cost a lot extra, but I'll still drive. It's not even a question.
Not anymore my friend, from TFL and the mayor's office:

We are making a number of temporary changes to the central London Congestion Charge to help us get London moving safely and sustainably.

The temporary changes are designed to reduce traffic in central London and enable more journeys to be made safely by foot or bike, while keeping the bus network reliable for those making essential journeys. The temporary changes will apply from Monday 22 June.

These include increasing the Congestion Charge to £15 per day, removing the £1 Auto Pay and Fleet discounts, and extending the hours of operation to between 07:00 and 22:00 seven days a week (excluding Christmas Day). The Residents' Discount will also be closed to new applicants from 1 August.

Yours sincerely,

Paul Cowperthwaite
General Manager, Road User Charging

I refer you all to my earlier posts on charging motorists.

I should imagine that will see a lot of independent small traders pack it up as a bad job.
 

Chef

LE
Which caused me to check the address of the National Archives:
Situation normal, jogging resumed!
That's a relief but I'd keep it quiet Mr Khan the bus driver's son needs to get his money from someone.

There was talk of extending some of the zones to the M25. I hope they've forgotten about that.
 
It will be interesting to see how the lockdown etc changes how we work.
I think working from home (WFH) was viewed with a bit of suspicion by many employers. I think now that many employers have been effectively forced to allow WFH and many have discovered it works perfectly well and can in some cases offer improved productivity.
I've heard that a major bank in Canada One are looking at 50% of their staff WFH going forward. There are quite a few businesses thinking the same. Think of the savings in perm office space.

The org I currently work for already have a policy that everyone should WFH one day a week. We hot-desked, so sometimes getting a desk could be a pain, equally booking meeting rooms. With the restrictions in place now, office capacity is reduced by about 70%

Certainly from my POV I get far more done at home. My home setup is 100% better than the office, I have two 28" HD monitors, a comfy gaming style chair, etc. I can leave work out on my desk, its much quieter.
I don't need to wear a headset on Teams calls, I have a desk mic and audio through speakers.
I'm not commuting for 2 hrs a day, so much less tiring. etc etc. My team feel much the same way.

We use MS Teams which really is very good, sharing screens, whiteboarding, dragging people into meetings (no need to find/book rooms) and using the chat function.
Face to face is good, so we are planning to meet up once a month or for more important stuff, 1-2-1s, performance reviews etc; when the situation normalises a bit. (I'm not giving up my car allowance!)

Suddenly asking people to go to a building a sit together to often talk to other people over the internet; looks very very outdated. So what could be the impact of more people WFH?
How many people not commuting into the city and or not needing to live in the city would it take to start impacting house prices for example. Could that mean pushing up prices outside the cities?
The development of houses with working spaces (we used to call it a study) factored in, etc.

Personally I think much greater WFH is the future.
 
Sounds like the sort of thing Dick Strawbridge would do, sorry "Major" Strawbridge. Loved his stuff on scrapheap challenge, then he had a serious of his own with one of the first episodes on taking old chip oil and making bio diesel out of it. Had my Missus believing we could buy big vats of veggie oil and run her diesel 4WD when the price went up....
He was on the telly last night. Now carrying a few extra pounds. I think he is about to explode any day now.
 
It will be interesting to see how the lockdown etc changes how we work.
I think working from home (WFH) was viewed with a bit of suspicion by many employers. I think now that many employers have been effectively forced to allow WFH and many have discovered it works perfectly well and can in some cases offer improved productivity.
I've heard that a major bank in Canada One are looking at 50% of their staff WFH going forward. There are quite a few businesses thinking the same. Think of the savings in perm office space.

The org I currently work for already have a policy that everyone should WFH one day a week. We hot-desked, so sometimes getting a desk could be a pain, equally booking meeting rooms. With the restrictions in place now, office capacity is reduced by about 70%

Certainly from my POV I get far more done at home. My home setup is 100% better than the office, I have two 28" HD monitors, a comfy gaming style chair, etc. I can leave work out on my desk, its much quieter.
I don't need to wear a headset on Teams calls, I have a desk mic and audio through speakers.
I'm not commuting for 2 hrs a day, so much less tiring. etc etc. My team feel much the same way.

We use MS Teams which really is very good, sharing screens, whiteboarding, dragging people into meetings (no need to find/book rooms) and using the chat function.
Face to face is good, so we are planning to meet up once a month or for more important stuff, 1-2-1s, performance reviews etc; when the situation normalises a bit. (I'm not giving up my car allowance!)

Suddenly asking people to go to a building a sit together to often talk to other people over the internet; looks very very outdated. So what could be the impact of more people WFH?
How many people not commuting into the city and or not needing to live in the city would it take to start impacting house prices for example. Could that mean pushing up prices outside the cities?
The development of houses with working spaces (we used to call it a study) factored in, etc.

Personally I think much greater WFH is the future.
I agree, I was very reluctant to work from home as I thought there would be too many distractions, but it's quite the opposite. I get more done, I'm saving £280 a month in fuel as I normally have a long commute, I'm not sat for two hours in traffic every day so I'm less stressed out, and I don't mind working through my lunch or a bit later after 17:00 to finish up seen as I don't have the drive home afterwards meaning I'm still in my own time earlier than I would be normally. I'll be kicking and screaming when the company decides they want us all back in the office, I'm hoping home working will be negotiable otherwise I'll be looking to move to a company that will let me do it.
 
I agree, I was very reluctant to work from home as I thought there would be too many distractions, but it's quite the opposite. I get more done, I'm saving £280 a month in fuel as I normally have a long commute, I'm not sat for two hours in traffic every day so I'm less stressed out, and I don't mind working through my lunch or a bit later after 17:00 to finish up seen as I don't have the drive home afterwards meaning I'm still in my own time earlier than I would be normally. I'll be kicking and screaming when the company decides they want us all back in the office, I'm hoping home working will be negotiable otherwise I'll be looking to move to a company that will let me do it.
Do the implications of working from home have any ramifications for the unpleasant phenomenon known as HR?
I do hope they become extinct and revert back to the box marked Personnel.
 
It will be interesting to see how the lockdown etc changes how we work.
I think working from home (WFH) was viewed with a bit of suspicion by many employers. I think now that many employers have been effectively forced to allow WFH and many have discovered it works perfectly well and can in some cases offer improved productivity.
I've heard that a major bank in Canada One are looking at 50% of their staff WFH going forward. There are quite a few businesses thinking the same. Think of the savings in perm office space.

The org I currently work for already have a policy that everyone should WFH one day a week. We hot-desked, so sometimes getting a desk could be a pain, equally booking meeting rooms. With the restrictions in place now, office capacity is reduced by about 70%

Certainly from my POV I get far more done at home. My home setup is 100% better than the office, I have two 28" HD monitors, a comfy gaming style chair, etc. I can leave work out on my desk, its much quieter.
I don't need to wear a headset on Teams calls, I have a desk mic and audio through speakers.
I'm not commuting for 2 hrs a day, so much less tiring. etc etc. My team feel much the same way.

We use MS Teams which really is very good, sharing screens, whiteboarding, dragging people into meetings (no need to find/book rooms) and using the chat function.
Face to face is good, so we are planning to meet up once a month or for more important stuff, 1-2-1s, performance reviews etc; when the situation normalises a bit. (I'm not giving up my car allowance!)

Suddenly asking people to go to a building a sit together to often talk to other people over the internet; looks very very outdated. So what could be the impact of more people WFH?
How many people not commuting into the city and or not needing to live in the city would it take to start impacting house prices for example. Could that mean pushing up prices outside the cities?
The development of houses with working spaces (we used to call it a study) factored in, etc.

Personally I think much greater WFH is the future.
A good letter in the latest Spectator.

All very well for the old dogs who know the ropes, but not so helpful for the young ones who are learning their way – there are only so many emails/phone calls you can make to colleagues to say: what do I do now/how should I approach this; very different from an office environment where you can just sidle up to somebody’s desk, or ask while making coffee.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer

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