Extinction Rebellion protesters - what to do?

Well, this doesn't quite fit the XR narrative; a huge spike in Methane emissions emanating from that filthy industrial hub - South Sudan.

BBC News - Climate change: Methane pulse detected from South Sudan wetlands
I'm not sure how you think it doesn't fit their narrative. Methane is Methane. How is it different to the methane from melting siberian permafrost?
 
Oh, it is - wish i'd have paid more attention when my brain was more receptive than it is now!
I used to run 'adventure' 4x4 trips across North Africa, the Geologist was one of my customers - the terrain was completely different in Morocco for example, especially over the Atlas mountains where (I believe) the Cedar forests thrived in the volcanic ash, to the exclusion of pretty much everything else, Todra Gorge is basically a huge channel cut through sedimentary rock. Back over to Tunisia (only spent a little time in Algiera, not all of it pleasant!) The Chott El Jerid salt flats are the remenants of a sea or inland salt lake, which I presume the shells in my photo above would have been part of at one time. I do find it fascinating to be able to look back in time and 'join the dots' so to speak, i'll certainly be looking at those OU courses.
I have a picture of me on the Chott El Jerid somewhere. I'll see if I can find it and scan it. Is the abandoned coach still on surface to the south of the P16 road?
 

gung_hobo

Old-Salt
Sorry to interrupt a right good bun fest. If I might ask a question please? I'm confused. A previously "brown" area of South Sudan (not known for producing a calorie surplus) has greened and therefore could now support many endangered species and/or provide food for the population. Exactly how is this bad? Do we not want to support endangered species and to feed people as the effects of change reduce the ability of other areas to do this?

No axe to grind, merely confused. Surely we should be celebrating the greening of a previously relatively unproductive area?

Ah well.
 
Jorvik was a major Viking port as well, the Romans and Vikings used shallow draft craft which allowed them to make better use of inland waterways. Also many rivers have been re-directed or have silted up.

Another little known fact is that Scotland is rising and the South of England is sinking, this is due to the Ice Age and the weight of the ice pushing Scotland and the North of England down while raising the South East.

I dispute your theory that the weight of the ice pushing Scotland and the North of England down while raising the South East. As any fool kno the abbopatamus and lady wagonmaster general Thornberry both reside in the South East and as the densest elements known to man, no amount of ice could outweigh those two heifers together.
 

Tyk

LE
Sorry to interrupt a right good bun fest. If I might ask a question please? I'm confused. A previously "brown" area of South Sudan (not known for producing a calorie surplus) has greened and therefore could now support many endangered species and/or provide food for the population. Exactly how is this bad? Do we not want to support endangered species and to feed people as the effects of change reduce the ability of other areas to do this?

No axe to grind, merely confused. Surely we should be celebrating the greening of a previously relatively unproductive area?

Ah well.
That is quite possibly down to better land management, there was a vid on that subject a while back I'll see if I can track it down tomorrow. I know the vid author who's the scientist responsible for the improved techniques was educating people in places like the Sudan.
Of course the opposite has also happened in human history, mankind screwed the ecology of the Sahara region which became a desert, possibly with some climate change contributing a chunk too.
 
I'm not sure how you think it doesn't fit their narrative. Methane is Methane. How is it different to the methane from melting siberian permafrost?
Because its source isn't the evil, despotic industrialised countries.
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Makes sense hence why they built a castle there, so it could be supplied by land or water
Criminal Kinmel Bay must have been under water then or at least Marshland (old home village).
 

aardvark64

Old-Salt

OneTenner

Old-Salt
I have a picture of me on the Chott El Jerid somewhere. I'll see if I can find it and scan it. Is the abandoned coach still on surface to the south of the P16 road?
Not been there for a few years, there was a coach visible, well, the shell of it anyway
This is the only photo I can find at the mo,

DSC01876.JPG

There's the usual tat sellers there, one of the guys bought a desert rose, when he got home he put in his garden - predictably, after the first day of rain it turned into a small pile of wet sand....
 

Tyk

LE
That is quite possibly down to better land management, there was a vid on that subject a while back I'll see if I can track it down tomorrow. I know the vid author who's the scientist responsible for the improved techniques was educating people in places like the Sudan.
Of course the opposite has also happened in human history, mankind screwed the ecology of the Sahara region which became a desert, possibly with some climate change contributing a chunk too.
Sorry for replying to myself, here's the video and shockingly if the XR spanners who say animals and eating them is a bad thing watched this and actually listened to the guy they may have a reality moment.

 
Not been there for a few years, there was a coach visible, well, the shell of it anyway
This is the only photo I can find at the mo,

View attachment 436349
There's the usual tat sellers there, one of the guys bought a desert rose, when he got home he put in his garden - predictably, after the first day of rain it turned into a small pile of wet sand....
I think we stopped there as well. The Tunisian equivalent of Teebay.
 
That is quite possibly down to better land management, there was a vid on that subject a while back I'll see if I can track it down tomorrow. I know the vid author who's the scientist responsible for the improved techniques was educating people in places like the Sudan.
Of course the opposite has also happened in human history, mankind screwed the ecology of the Sahara region which became a desert, possibly with some climate change contributing a chunk too.
Careful now!

To address @gung_hobo's question, it may also be the result of natural variation for the region (like el nino / el nina) which is being observed for the first time because we now have the instruments to do so.
 

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