Extinct army trades

#1
During WW1 many miles of tunnels were dug using miners from the coalfields of Yorkshire and South Wales. But has there ever been a formal army trade of miner?

If not, what would the miners have come under - which corps would they have served with and what would have been the eligibility for such a role? I suspect it would have come under Royal Engineers, but I can't think of anything other than that.

Any ideas anyone?
 
#2
How about the Pioneers?

Or the 'Black Watch', he say tongue in cheek.
 
#4
1856 The soldier Corps of Royal Sappers and Miners amalgamates with the officer Corps of Royal Engineers to form the Corps of Royal Engineers (controlled by the War Office).

There was a trade of miner.. albeit a long time ago!!
 
#7
Each infantry Bn had a regimental tailor (now confined to the Guards) and regimental bootmaker, both were military trades.
 
#9
Busterdog said:
Each infantry Bn had a regimental tailor (now confined to the Guards) and regimental bootmaker, both were military trades.
Regimental book-cooker. Now AGC (SPS) Regimental Accountant.
 
#10
Your first world war miners would have most probably been drafted in to serve as Sappers (as in the job, not just the name) as well as primarily being employed tunnelling to deploy explosives under enemy positions

Sapping to create trench networks:



Tunnelling:

British response



On 3 December 1914, the CO of IV Corps, Sir Henry Rawlinson requested the establishment of a special battalion to assist with mining duties. On 28 December 1914, in the tense time following the first German mine attacks, Major John Norton Griffiths - a larger than life character, formerly an MP and an officer of the 2nd King Edward's Horse - suggested the hiring of 'clay kickers', men with a particular skill who had been employed in mining for the London Underground.

The Armies were ordered to proceed with offensive mining operations using any suitable personnel they could find from within the ranks. These men were formed into Brigade Mining Sections. On 17 February 1915, the first British mine was blown at Hill 60 by RE troops of 28th Division.



A decision was taken in February 1915 to form 8 Tunnelling Companies, made of men drawn from the ranks, mixed with drafts of men specially recruited for this kind of work. This has been described as the quickest intentional act in the war: men who were working underground as civilians in the UK on February 17th were underground at Givenchy only four days later! Such was the urgency of needing countermeasures against the aggressive German actions. Another 12 Companies were eventually formed in 1915, and one further one in 1916. A Canadian Tunnelling Company was formed in France, and two more arrived from home, by March 1916. Three Australian and one New Zealand Tunnelling Companies arrived on the Western Front by May 1916. All of these units were engaged on underground work including the digging of subways, cable trenches, saps, chambers (for such things as signals and medical services), as well as offensive or defensive mining

Use in modern warfare
Mining saw a brief resurgence as a military tactic during the First World War when army engineers would attempt to break the stalemate of trench warfare by tunneling under no man's land and laying large quantities of explosives beneath the enemy's trench. As in siege warfare, mining was possible due to the static nature of the fighting.

A notable example was the Battle of Messines, when 450 tonnes of high explosive were placed in 21 mines after about two years of sapping. Approximately 10,000 German troops were killed when 19 of the mines were simultaneously detonated. One of the explosive caches exploded years later. The 21st cache was never found and there are still several tonnes of high explosive buried somewhere in the Belgian countryside.

Another example is recorded in Louis Trenker's Berge in Flammen. Whole mountain peaks at the Alps were exploded during the mountain war. Col Di Lana, Lagazuoi, Marmolata, were a few of these peaks.
 
#13
Anyone know do mobile bath units still exist,what corps were they
 
#14
Regimental Hygene and pest specialist (rat catcher) done at the RAMC depot at Ash Vale.
Naff job course on rear party for op Banner in 79 altho came into its own in Falklands 83 when I was the battery rat catcher round the Rapier sites at San Carlos
 
#16
lightning47 said:
Mobile Bath units still existed in the 1980s (I used one whilst on exercise in Germany). It was, I believe, an RAOC unit.
Still going.

http://www.army.mod.uk/temp/rlcta_old/trades/laundry_operator.htm

710 Laundry Squadron.
One of the most welcome sights to a weary soldier is the arrival of a mobile shower and laundry unit. Laundry Operatives use modern, portable equipment and not only provide morale boosting shower facilities, but support field hospitals in the provision of clinically clean bedding, theatre linen and staff protective clothing. The Squadron is always in demand and members are serving in various parts of the world.
 
#18
Fatbadge said:
1856 The soldier Corps of Royal Sappers and Miners amalgamates with the officer Corps of Royal Engineers to form the Corps of Royal Engineers (controlled by the War Office).

There was a trade of miner.. albeit a long time ago!!
Wasn't Knocker traded as a miner?
 
#19
Detmold_Drunk said:
engine driver?
Still got those serving with 165(V) Port Regt RLC although the trade group is 'Railwaymen'
 
#20
amazing__lobster said:
Fatbadge said:
1856 The soldier Corps of Royal Sappers and Miners amalgamates with the officer Corps of Royal Engineers to form the Corps of Royal Engineers (controlled by the War Office).

There was a trade of miner.. albeit a long time ago!!
Wasn't Knocker traded as a miner?
No he was Gundulph's batman.
 

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