Explosives charge soldiers guilty

#2
How the hell does a lance jack get £80,000 in debt???
 
#3
saintstone said:
How the hell does a lance jack get £80,000 in debt???
Probably a car from "cars direct" about £10,000 worth there, wouldnt be hard to get about 4 or 5 credit cards with £5000 to £8000 on and max them out, couple of £20,000 loans and he would be about there.
 
#4
saintstone said:
How the hell does a lance jack get £80,000 in debt???
He didn't.

Soldier X, a 37-year-old Colour Sgt...

Soldier X admitted he was £80,000 in debt ...

Pension? What pension?
 

chimera

LE
Moderator
#6
And whilst these scroats were up before the beak, the rest of the Battalion was coming back from HERRICK.

Rather takes the edge off the homecoming celebrations.
 
#8
So where does it mention HE?
 
#9
devilish said:
So where does it mention HE?
Cross-border police investigators were led to Howe Barracks after military explosives were found concealed in a suitcase during a drugs raid at the Glasgow flat of Andrew Quinn (previously known as soldier A), a former serviceman with the 5 Scots

It does help if you read the article.
 
#10
msr said:
devilish said:
So where does it mention HE?
Cross-border police investigators were led to Howe Barracks after military explosives were found concealed in a suitcase during a drugs raid at the Glasgow flat of Andrew Quinn (previously known as soldier A), a former serviceman with the 5 Scots

It does help if you read the article.
Devilish, I thought that too. No mention of any in his locker though.
 
#11
So the haul was one buckshee 7.62mm ball round, and the rest was various types of pyro and blank? No actual HE?

From the list given, the only item that actually appears to be illegal in civvie street (as opposed to squaddie being in breach of a range declaration, and other military law offences, etc) would be the one 7.62mm round. All of the others mentioned can be legally bought and owned without licence.

Still naughty, but seems very over-exaggerated, as usual. Does anyone have any further detail?
 
#12
4(T) said:
So the haul was one buckshee 7.62mm ball round, and the rest was various types of pyro and blank? No actual HE?

From the list given, the only item that actually appears to be illegal in civvie street (as opposed to squaddie being in breach of a range declaration, and other military law offences, etc) would be the one 7.62mm round. All of the others mentioned can be legally bought and owned without licence.

Still naughty, but seems very over-exaggerated, as usual. Does anyone have any further detail?
what about the detonators?
 
#14
CRmeansCeilingReached said:
4(T) said:
So the haul was one buckshee 7.62mm ball round, and the rest was various types of pyro and blank? No actual HE?

From the list given, the only item that actually appears to be illegal in civvie street (as opposed to squaddie being in breach of a range declaration, and other military law offences, etc) would be the one 7.62mm round. All of the others mentioned can be legally bought and owned without licence.

Still naughty, but seems very over-exaggerated, as usual. Does anyone have any further detail?
what about the detonators?
I stand to be corrected, but I'm pretty sure detonators are not controlled items: consider the rail safety blast caps that railway workers use, or primers used in reloading cased ammunition, or quarry dets, or even humble firework bangers - they are more or less the same sort of device, and I'm not aware that legislation exists that seeks to differentiate them (ammo reloaders now have to show an FAC to buy primers - no controls on ownership or use - but thats a recent and specific knee-jerk legislation).
 
#15
msr said:
devilish said:
So where does it mention HE?
Cross-border police investigators were led to Howe Barracks after military explosives were found concealed in a suitcase during a drugs raid at the Glasgow flat of Andrew Quinn (previously known as soldier A), a former serviceman with the 5 Scots

It does help if you read the article.
I did read the article and yes the press mention military explosives but then fail to actually list any military explosives.
 
#16
4(T) said:
CRmeansCeilingReached said:
4(T) said:
So the haul was one buckshee 7.62mm ball round, and the rest was various types of pyro and blank? No actual HE?

From the list given, the only item that actually appears to be illegal in civvie street (as opposed to squaddie being in breach of a range declaration, and other military law offences, etc) would be the one 7.62mm round. All of the others mentioned can be legally bought and owned without licence.

Still naughty, but seems very over-exaggerated, as usual. Does anyone have any further detail?
what about the detonators?
I stand to be corrected, but I'm pretty sure detonators are not controlled items: consider the rail safety blast caps that railway workers use, or primers used in reloading cased ammunition, or quarry dets, or even humble firework bangers - they are more or less the same sort of device, and I'm not aware that legislation exists that seeks to differentiate them (ammo reloaders now have to show an FAC to buy primers - no controls on ownership or use - but thats a recent and specific knee-jerk legislation).
Military detonators are controlled items and are covered in the relevant JSP under AACTO (Ammunition Attractive to Criminal and Terrorist Organisations) exactly for this sort of situation. This is if we are talking here about detonators containing primary explosives which are designed specifically to initiate HE and cannot be described as 'Firework Bangers'.

Obviously what the BBC has determined as detonators is anyones guess.
 
#17
imanATOgetmeoutofhere said:
4(T) said:
CRmeansCeilingReached said:
4(T) said:
So the haul was one buckshee 7.62mm ball round, and the rest was various types of pyro and blank? No actual HE?

From the list given, the only item that actually appears to be illegal in civvie street (as opposed to squaddie being in breach of a range declaration, and other military law offences, etc) would be the one 7.62mm round. All of the others mentioned can be legally bought and owned without licence.

Still naughty, but seems very over-exaggerated, as usual. Does anyone have any further detail?
what about the detonators?
I stand to be corrected, but I'm pretty sure detonators are not controlled items: consider the rail safety blast caps that railway workers use, or primers used in reloading cased ammunition, or quarry dets, or even humble firework bangers - they are more or less the same sort of device, and I'm not aware that legislation exists that seeks to differentiate them (ammo reloaders now have to show an FAC to buy primers - no controls on ownership or use - but thats a recent and specific knee-jerk legislation).
Military detonators are controlled items and are covered in the relevant JSP under AACTO (Ammunition Attractive to Criminal and Terrorist Organisations) exactly for this sort of situation. This is if we are talking here about detonators containing primary explosives which are designed specifically to initiate HE and cannot be described as 'Firework Bangers'.

Obviously what the BBC has determined as detonators is anyones guess.
Thats what I mean - sure, military detonators are declared "controlled" by JSP whilst they part of military stores, but that has no relevance to the status of detonators under civilian firearms law. E.g. if for example you had possession of some "live" military surplus detonators from another era (as ammo collectors have inert versions), I don't think you would actually be committing an offence.
 
#18
I have known Soldier X for about 20 years and he's definitely no angel (tip - he used to be a WO2) but the whole case stinks like the bad girls wing at MCTC. The only evidence seems to have been one bloke (who had been caught bang to rights) claiming to have stolen the explosives from his locker and then allegedly passing him £2,500 after returning from leave. There doesn't seem to have been any other evidence of that money, such as any property or goods or even any bank transactions - only the fact that he had been (and presumably still is) £80,000 in debt.

Soldier X admitted knowing about the dodgy stuff in his locker and possibly an error of judgement but I suspect he's been stitched up like a kipper. 3 yrs from a pension - ouch!
 
#19
#20

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