Explain this snow pattern

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
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Light dusting of snow last night.

Saw this pattern on the small patio area in back garden.

Snow has melted next to each intersection although not on the join itself.
More obvious next to the house.
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Can you explain it, I can't.
 
Underground warmer than the surface. More heat escaping through the joints where more area is exposed. Tiles chill and remain cold..
 
What Lardbeast said. Heat is dissipating from your house through the slabs.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
January 73, my A-level year, a week at Nottingham university to give us a feeling. A lecture on microclimatogy. Isobars may stretch 1,000 miles, but climate can vary vertically in a few feet. Why Stevenson screens are all mounted 4½ feet (iirc) off the ground.

They showed pictures of the same scenes in early and late winter. Patterns of snow changed accordingly.

I think you'll find the pattern you see is because the grass or whatever is starting to warm as it starts to grow again, while in the cold air before the snow, the centres of the slabs radiated away more heat and were therefore colder.

But I know nothing.

Day after I returned home, Sunderland AFC went to play Notts Co at the start of their great adventure and drew 1-1. The rest is history.
 
Happens on our patio 2x2 slabs too, even after a large rain they dry in that kind of pattern except the opposite happens, they dry in the centre and the edges remain wet.
 
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Can anyone explain what is going on here?
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Errr.. nope.
 
Warmer moist air moving over a cold surface. Condensation into isolated fog/mist patches. Movement blocked by the deadfalls so other side is clear. Air will be moving imperceptibly slowly.

You find it in hollows into which the air trickles as well.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Underground warmer than the surface. More heat escaping through the joints where more area is exposed. Tiles chill and remain cold..
So why are the joins between slabs also frozen, if heat was escaping through them, would expect them to melt first
 

Slime

LE
explanations most likely as heat from the house, as per above, but also because many people lay slabs by putting a blob of muck under the centre of each slab, then use a mallet on each (lesser supported) corner to lever the slab up with the surrounding slabs.

This leaves the centre of each slab with a thicker area less prone to heat exchange.

This same pattern can often be seen on frost covered slabs too.
 
Give us a clue?
It's a strange weather phenomenon occuring because of the extreme cold.

Warmer moist air moving over a cold surface. Condensation into isolated fog/mist patches. Movement blocked by the deadfalls so other side is clear. Air will be moving imperceptibly slowly.

You find it in hollows into which the air trickles as well.
Very good answer.
It is -44c creating an Ice Mist to form above Lake Ontario of which the shoreline is about 10 feet behind the fallen tree, this mist slowly rolls inland. It isn't snow on branches or the ground it's actually ice pellets which stick to everything.
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Here's another shot taken before the path.
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and another shot taken from the end of my street later in the day.
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My fully charged camera died after 3 shots btw.
 
Yup, moist air coming off the lake over the frozen ground. Goes directly to deposition of solid particles at those low temps, rather than condensation into a liquid. Sticks to everything as you say.

You should see it happening if you watch it for a while, also the way it flows around objects.
 
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It also causes this.
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and this.
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