Experienced IT Professional > Army Sys Eng Tech

#1
Hi all,

I have my application in with the Army for Systems Engineer Tech (or Comm Sys Eng). Passed the BARB (87), Med forms and now just awaiting a date for a formal interview. Once I've passed that, I think it's ADSC next.

My questions comes in regards to how I will be treated during basic, in trade training, and ultimately in the unit, as I am now 22 years old working as a Desktop/Systems Engineer - I've been working in the IT banking sector since leaving school. I have an Advanced Apprenticeship in IT, Advanced Diploma for IT Practitioners, CompTIA A+/Network+ and the MCSE certification.

With this type of experience and qualifications, would I be entrusted with more responsibility during these periods, particularly in the final units?

Would I be treated differently in basic and phase 2 training?

Being older, with good solid experience behind me, is it more "likely" that I'll be promoted sooner, compared to the average time it takes?

Finally, can someone tell me why Sys Eng Tech trade training is 41 weeks long, and IS Eng is only 24 weeks long - My experience in civi street is that techs require less knowledge than System Admins/Engineers to do there job, for which their pay reflects this i.e. doesn't the ranking go Help desk > Technician > Sys/Network Admin/Engineer?

Cheers,

Matt
 
#3
What on earth? Where did I say that?

I have 5-6 years more experience working in IT compared to the "average" 16/17 year old recruit. I was wondering if this would stand me in better sted for taking on more responsibility once through phase 2 training. Yes, I expect to be doing menial jobs, but it'd be nice if I could also use some of that experience, too.

What the hell is wrong with that?
 
#4
Stay in Civi Street, you'll be liked more there. It's not the Army, that's why it's different to the experience you have so far.
 
#5
I understand what you mean, but civi street lacks so much that the Army offers - travel, unique experiences, active lifestyle, sports and the chance to work on equipment not available in civi street.
 
#7
ITMatt said:
I understand what you mean, but civi street lacks so much that the Army offers - travel, unique experiences, active lifestyle, sports and the chance to work on equipment not available in civi street.
Don't know about yours, but the civi street I inhabit offers me all of the above, apart from the obsolete technology the army still insists on using, all with the added bonus of being able to run my life how I want to.

msr
 
#8
[quote="msr]Don't know about yours, but the civi street I inhabit offers me all of the above, apart from the obsolete technology the army still insists on using, all with the added bonus of being able to run my life how I want to.[/quote]

Along with overtime and the working time directive! In is good but out has its good bits too.
 
#9
I joined aged 21 many moons ago, i was 3rd oldest in my recruit troop and had by that age been round the world a couple of times and lived abroad already, it counted for jack all and neither did i expect it too, in basic your just a number mate and your instructors couldnt give a toss if your an ex brain surgeon, your new mukas might think your a bit older and wiser but then they might have been up to lots of interesting stuff too before they joined and its only a couple of years which means nowt when your getting nearer forty, and whilst im at it i was best recruit aswell and got a nice book from a Big cheese at the passing out parade (which was nice) trumpet blown, im off now.
 
#10
Some mixed thoughts on the pros and cons of joining.

Those are good reasons for wanting to leave my secure civi IT job, for a career in the Army, aren't they?

P.S. I wasn't expecting any privileges, or anything like that, it's more along the lines of avoiding help desk functions as much as possible, it's like a death sentence.
 
#11
The army will tell you if your clever enough or not

It does not matter what you bring from outside other than a listen and learning attitude. if you bring anything else upon your head it be (you have been informed)

If for example your bringing the attitude you have displayed in the initial post you will not do will or go far.
 
#12
Your only young mate and if you dont join now you will regret it and look back in years to come and thought i should have given it a go. Even if you think its utter pants you can just do the minimum and get out. Your IT skills wont suffer that much if you dont stick it, your job now isnt secure either nobodys bar gold plated retiring sick at 50 gobment jobs are. you have many years ahead of you yet and three years deciding wether you like the army or not is not gonna change too much but would be a wonderfull oportunatiy missed if you like it.
 
#13
ITMatt,

Sorry I missed your earlier LIAG post, I would have mentioned LCISG.

I'm TA and my experience of Sigs is (today):

Having a high conversation about a mil ICS problem, discussing UDP vrs TCP or maybe using an OTS solution and then putting uniform on and cleaning weapons (first bit civvie job)
 

Alsacien

MIA
Moderator
#14
ITMatt said:
Some mixed thoughts on the pros and cons of joining.

Those are good reasons for wanting to leave my secure civi IT job, for a career in the Army, aren't they?

P.S. I wasn't expecting any privileges, or anything like that, it's more along the lines of avoiding help desk functions as much as possible, it's like a death sentence.
I don't know why all these cnuts are giving you such a hard time - you want to join up - fair play mate.
Its always better to show what you can do rather than say what you can do - saves getting tripped up.
The army will want to get the most it can out of you, in time you will figure out when its best to put up or shut up. If you wind someone up (see above) by coming across as a gobby cnut, you will find yourself translating the works of Shakespear into hex....

Enjoy! :wink:
 
#15
ITMatt said:
Would I be treated differently in basic and phase 2 training?

Being older, with good solid experience behind me, is it more "likely" that I'll be promoted sooner, compared to the average time it takes?

Finally, can someone tell me why Sys Eng Tech trade training is 41 weeks long, and IS Eng is only 24 weeks long - My experience in civi street is that techs require less knowledge than System Admins/Engineers to do there job, for which their pay reflects this i.e. doesn't the ranking go Help desk > Technician > Sys/Network Admin/Engineer?
No

Yes

and I don't think your idea of tech is the same as the Royal Signals. Check out their job descriptions its not all about the white boxes. Anyway they are combining the two trades so dunna worry about it.

Although the numptys that decide such things in the corp will probably change their mind next year and split them again. Their gonna run out of stupid names to call them soon.

since Ive been in they hav had Radio Techs, System Techs, Sys Eng Techs, IS operators, IS engineers and now Comms Sys Eng same people generally just different names depending on the current manning crisis the Corp have created.
 
#16
So, you're an MCSE wrking in the banking sector, that puts you on £30/40K a year if you're any good and you want to give that up for a life in a gren suit?

I smell bull shoite, I hear 'WAH'!
 
#17
and if you go in blowing your own trumpet, then expect it to be taken from your mouth and stuffed where the sun dont shine.....



i think the old addage, soldier first........
 
#18
Airfix - £30/40K a year, in the North - Who are you kidding?:lol:

That salary is reserved for senior techs and management, neither of which I am - Try £23k (35hrs).
 
#19
ITMatt said:
Airfix - £30/40K a year, in the North - Who are you kidding?:lol:

That salary is reserved for senior techs and management, neither of which I am - Try £23k (35hrs).
Are you looking in the right places? My employer has recently opened an office near M1/M62 junction because we can't recruit enough people in West Yorks, the new office is to recruit programmers/techs from South Yorkshire/Nottingham/Derby.

p.s. If your looking for a job in Leeds, read up on NPfIT and target employers in this field (Leeds has loads).
 
#20
I always find it bizarre on this site that someone asks a sensible question, then gets a slagging from those that deign to comment. So with that in mind I'll try to answer your 2 main questions.

In basic training you will be treated like everyone else. That said if you display maturity and reliability you will not get such a hard time, in the later stages, as some of the less receptive elements. Your phase 2 course officer may allow you to skip bits if you can clearly demonstrate that you can meet the training objectives it covers. You must be able to do this fully and don't forget nobody likes a smart arse.

Tech training is longer, still, because our undertanding of a tech is considerably different to that in the IT industry. Our techs must be able, in all circumstances, even if still a sprog, to correctly diagnose a problem and take action to restore services. At the very least they are expected to restore services even if they don't know exactly where the fault lies. This covers every conceivable system including Satcom, LOS radio relay, multiplexing, network devices, cables etc. etc. etc. This is in practice impossible but the basic skills must be developed early.

As pointed out earlier, the two trades are about to combine. For me this is a massive mistake, one that the Navy made and have now gone back on. Even the RAF only went partly down this road and still allow some specialisation. (TG 3 and 11 into TG 4). The bloke who will be able to cover all the knowledge of both trades will need to be an IT graduate type. He/she will hardly choose to be a siggie/NCO for years, but instead will either be suitable for a commission or not even join the military.

Hope this helps.
 

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