Exercise induced asthma

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by Firthy556, May 11, 2009.

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  1. Upon a bit of research tonight after having a run home from work and failing miserably i believe i may have exercise induced asthma on the basis that for example if i am in the gym i can do cardio for ages, much harder than a mile or so run home.

    But because it was outside I ended up being out of breath within a minute or so with my chest feeling really tight.

    Apparently its caused by the cold air hitting your lungs causing asthma when outside and hyperventilating due to running.

    This is just me being curious at the moment. I will go get it checked out asap. As to whether this affects my joining as the army website says :

    Chest Disorders

    * Asthma, wheeze or Asthma symptoms (and treatment) during the previous 4 years.

    As a recruitment no-go..

    Any had any experience of this?
  2. I thought I had this, turned out it was just cold outside and after a few running sessions, and a bit of time outside, I was fine

    Personally, I would take a little time, and get used to being outside before the docs, but thats my opinion mate
  3. rampant

    rampant LE Reviewer Book Reviewer

    It depends, where do you live? Is it a town/city or the country. It's less likely to be the cold air, recent studies have shown that petrol and diesel fumes seriously exacerbate allergic conditions such as asthma, hayfever and psorisis, amongst others. You can grow out of these conditions, for example I no longer suffer hayfever. I would advise you see your GP and get a series of tests done. It might be advisable to get a long conditioning device such as PowerBreathe, available here:


    they have shown to provide benefits. But like I said talk to your doctor first.
  4. Well i live in billingham on teesside which is a town.

    I will try spend more time outside its just the VAST difference between me on a treadmill running fine to me being so out of breath and dizzy before i have even warmed up running outside.

    Going to get a gp appointment and get some tests done i think to be safe.
  5. Whoa there! Go to a private clinic and get checked out. It will cost you a bit more, but you'll know the scorea and nothing will wind up on your medical records.
  6. Just go to your GP. better to have something on your records than die during a CFT because you went private to keep it quiet.

    It may sound dramatic, but people die every year from undiagnosed/untreated asthma.

    Bear in mind also that it may be something as simple as you becoming short of breath because of atmospheric conditions combined with Billingham polution.
  7. You only have one sensible option if concerned and that is to get it checked out by the GP.

    a. If it IS asthma, it will need treating.
    b. People die from untreated asthma.
    c. If you go private, are diagnosed asthmatic and hide in your application process then you can be kicked out for giving false info.
    d. If you join, get deployed and then have asthma attack in a firefight you will put yourself, your colleagues and the medical helicopter teams at risk.

    It may not even be asthma - and then you can stop worrying.
    If it IS asthma and not just a reaction to cold/ bug etc then you will not be able to join for four years. Don't forget (d) above.

  8. Asthma is a disease of inflammation triggered by an over-active immune response. Asthma is characterised by an inability to exhale properly and a feeling of not being able to breath. Asthma occurs in two phases, the early response to an inhaled allergen which can be characterised as an immediate shutting down of the breathing passages to prevent further allergen from entering the lungs and nasal passages, a bit like shutting your eye if grit enters it.
    This is followed by the late asthmatic response which is characterised by the formation of mucous plugs which block the alveoli of the lungs and is by far the more serious response. The LAR normally occurs several hours after the Early Asthmatic Response and often at night.
    As Jarrod very wisely said, don't self-diagnose. Get yourself checked out properly by your GP. Don't, under any circumstances, try to get a breathing aid or use bronchodilators, don't even use nose strips, until you have seen your GP.
    There are many reasons why you may have these breathing problems, not least because you are enjoying an aerobic exercise in a natural environment, in other words you are supposed to be out of breath! Running along a street is a lot harder than on a running machine, the surface is constantly changing causing constant micro shifts of balance. You will be constantly running up, down or on an even plane again requiring instant adjustments by the body so yes, it is more knackering.
    Sorry, probably bored you a bit there but I will reiterate that you must see your GP, end of.
  9. Well thanks guys been to my gp, did this test thing i had to "sigh" into then blow hard into and i got 30% better after using an inhaler.

    But the nurse said she thinks its just a reaction i had as i said i have never really done much exercise outside with the high pollen count / pollution and being semi unfit also she said sleep with my windows open as it helps as currently i never do.

    So basically see how it goes, ive got an inhaler just incase i do get the symptoms. But for now just going to carry on with lots of runs outside.

    Had my final interview at the AFCO today, they said ADSC is probably about 4-5 weeks wait.
  10. rampant

    rampant LE Reviewer Book Reviewer

    Good to hear. Keep up the training and best of luck to you.
  11. Well done on taking the plunge. That's good advice about keeping the window open. Good luck with joining up.
  12. If you declare you have an inhaler (an don't hide anything if asked) then make sure they know you were not diagnosed as asthmatic, as long as that's the case.
  13. Well like i said they don't think it is.

    I have got a allergy test booked at the hospital as my gp thinks its just an allergy.

    I have done a few runs since and not had it and have yet to use my inhaler.