Exemption from military service in WWII

#1
I'd appreciate some information: in the autobiography of H E Bates he says he wrote to a friend (13.8.1941) that his exemption from military service "expires in October" and he is then booked for service in the RAF under special duties. At this time Bates was a professional writer, married with four children, the youngest of whom was not yet 2 years old - but whose second birthday was to come on 01.11.1941. Was there at that time an exemption for having a child under 2? Does anyone here know, or know how I would find out?
 
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#2
Just top of my head but maybe contact the Imperial War Museum? I'm presuming that they get research requests and I guess at the very least they could point you in the right direction. I'll also ask a friend who has some knowledgeable colleagues
 
#3
Just top of my head but maybe contact the Imperial War Museum? I'm presuming that they get research requests and I guess at the very least they could point you in the right direction. I'll also ask a friend who has some knowledgeable colleagues
Thank you, do please let us know, I shall follow your suggestion also.
 
#4
He was commissioned as a war story writer by the Air Ministry. H.E. Bates had a temporary exemption during WW2 and had worked as a reporter. Biographers such as D.R. Baldwin attributed the temp exemption to Bates being " a man of 35 married with four children" but after the temporary exemption expired he would be pressed into service.

AIUI, after writing to the Air Ministry during his exemption period, Bates joined the RAFVR and served as a writer in PR, under the pseudonym Flying Officer X, writing with a roving brief about the people and squadrons he encountered, but much more than that.

Edit: Amazon How Sleep The Brave: Complete Stories of Flying Officer 'X' (Vintage Classics).

Herbert Bates – writing the war stories as Flying Officer X

The wartime RAF recruited writers and journalists, commissioned and then posted to stations in Public Relations. The idea was that they could write from inside the service --"public morale stories"-- rather than using civilian correspondents. All part of wartime censored propaganda and public morale.

Bates served at Uxbridge and Tangmere where he wrote about Bombers and No 1 (night intruder) Squadron. His tunic was presented to Tangmere a few years ago, and Graham Greene called him "one of the best short-story writers of my time" .

* Amazon: H.E. Bates - the Air Ministry's "writer-in-residence" - was instructed to prepare a book on the V1 concept, development, launching sites and the indiscriminate nature of their use. The novelist, with a wide knowledge of his subject, distilled a vivid portrait - only to see it become a victim of the 30-year rule. "Flying Bombs Over England", 1994.

* The Stories of Flying Officer 'X'

* H E Bates's RAF Tunic Presented To Museum | Tangmere Museum
 
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#5
He was commissioned as a war story writer by the Air Ministry. H.E. Bates had a temporary exemption during WW2 and had worked as a reporter. Biographers such as D.R. Baldwin attributed the temp exemption to Bates being " a man of 35 married with four children" but after the temporary exemption expired he would be pressed into service.

AIUI, after writing to the Air Ministry during his exemption period, Bates joined the RAFVR and served as a writer in PR, under the pseudonym Flying Officer X, writing with a roving brief about the people and squadrons he encountered, but much more than that.

Edit: Amazon How Sleep The Brave: Complete Stories of Flying Officer 'X' (Vintage Classics).

Herbert Bates – writing the war stories as Flying Officer X

The wartime RAF recruited writers and journalists, commissioned and then posted to stations in Public Relations. The idea was that they could write from inside the service --"public morale stories"-- rather than using civilian correspondents. All part of wartime censored propaganda and public morale.

Bates served at Uxbridge and Tangmere where he wrote about Bombers and No 1 (night intruder) Squadron. His tunic was presented to Tangmere a few years ago, and Graham Greene called him "one of the best short-story writers of my time" .

* Amazon: H.E. Bates - the Air Ministry's "writer-in-residence" - was instructed to prepare a book on the V1 concept, development, launching sites and the indiscriminate nature of their use. The novelist, with a wide knowledge of his subject, distilled a vivid portrait - only to see it become a victim of the 30-year rule. "Flying Bombs Over England", 1994.

* The Stories of Flying Officer 'X'

* H E Bates's RAF Tunic Presented To Museum | Tangmere Museum
Brilliant! Thank you. The "Flying Bombs Over England" is well worth a read, bought it a while back.
 
#7
YW @Sackerson . An enviable job, or not, scratching about for material, in wartime with tight lipped SP under pressure all the time. The story that he asked for and got an expense account for buying drinks, doesn't seem unlikely. H and his fellow hacks were bound to be rumbled eventually, which would account for his transfer to the Air Ministry on King Charles Street, also working from home.

H.E. Bates was much more than a hack, leaving thirty-odd books and TV & film material, and times were very hard in those days.

There's footage of him at his converted granary home a few miles from Charing in Kent.
 

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