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EXCLUSIVE: Carpeted: Dozens of cadets at Sandhurst broke coronavirus rules in a drunken party at the prestigious military academy

General Sir Nick Parker told me in conversation a few years ago that he had a query about dress regulations, so "logged onto ARRSE and had an answer back in minutes."
FFS @Bravo_Bravo. Don't keep us in suspenders, was it sleeves up or down:-?
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
I don’t necessarily think that anyone should be going to prison for a Covid breach, however the army thought it was appropriate in one case for a set of soldiers and must consider whether that same set considerations are appropriate in this case.

The days of Officers and ORs being punished differently for similar offences because of their status should have passed.

Or perhaps, on reflection, if the offences were similar (and it doesn't sound as though they were), wiser heads took the view that the first punishment was an over-reaction and not a principle worth losing a chunk of the next batch of junior officers for.

The test will be what happens to the next bunch of ORs who commit a similar offence and I agree that there should be consistency.
 

Oyibo

LE
Officer Cadets confined to RMAS get drunk with some outside their platoon bubble and get punished.

Arrse martinets go into meltdown.
 
Really? Internal disciplinary matter unless/until serious enough to reach civilian courts. Until then, the details are really none of your business or mine.
You’re probably right. It didn’t come across as intended which was “nothing to see here is not an adequate response”.

People line up these days to tear chunks off the military and by implication, those who have been connected. As many here fall into that category, many are less than impressed that foolish behaviour apparently compounded by some jack git going public on it has given the usual suspects another opportunity to wade in.

What’s a martinet by the way @Oyibo ?
 
Couple questions for the older types... in the days of unit detention, did RMAS have any cells in their guardroom?

If so, did any OCdts get pokey time and then continue their training (albeit possibly backtermed)? If not, did ORs posted to RMAS who were awarded time in the greybar hotel serve their sentences in Aldershot or wherever? And if so, did any OCdts do similar time and continue training, albeit potentially backtermed?

I suspect the answers are no, no, yes and no. But might be wrong.
 

Oyibo

LE
snipped

What’s a martinet by the way @Oyibo ?

In English, the term martinet usually refers not to the whip, but to those who might use it—those who demand strict adherence to set rules and mete out punishment for failing to follow them. This sense of the word reputedly comes from Jean Martinet, Inspector General of the army of Louis XIV, and thus, etymologically, only by accident relates to the earlier sense.

In an extended sense, a martinet is any person who believes strict adherence to rules and etiquette is paramount. Martinets often use etiquette and other rules as an excuse to trump ethics, to the point that etiquette loses its ethical ground. Time, in 1977, famously referred to the Ugandan dictator Idi Amin as a "strutting martinet"
 
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Ned_Seagoon

War Hero
Couple questions for the older types... in the days of unit detention, did RMAS have any cells in their guardroom?

If so, did any OCdts get pokey time and then continue their training (albeit possibly backtermed)? If not, did ORs posted to RMAS who were awarded time in the greybar hotel serve their sentences in Aldershot or wherever? And if so, did any OCdts do similar time and continue training, albeit potentially backtermed?

I suspect the answers are no, no, yes and no. But might be wrong.
Oh most certainly. The guardroom, complete with cells, was just off the Old College parade square on the right corner of the historic white building. Not unusual for cadets to be told to double away to present themselves for detention. Usually a short-lived affair but it was not unknown for some to have the overnight experience.
 
Oh most certainly. The guardroom, complete with cells, was just off the Old College parade square on the right corner of the historic white building. Not unusual for cadets to be told to double away to present themselves for detention. Usually a short-lived affair but it was not unknown for some to have the overnight experience.
With the most highly polished ceiling in the Army.
 
I’ve just checked the brochure. The Stripey Sunshine Room at San’st is described as “within a few minutes marching distance (at 400 paces/minute) of all the major entertainment centres of the resort such as New / Old College square, the Gymnasium” etc.
 
I am picking up from this thread that SUS (Soldiers Under Sentence) of 28 days or less are no longer confined in unit guardroom. Is that right ?

Oh for the days of taking over the Guardroom and signing for "the live bodies" of several miscreants. They made tea for the Guard Commander and NCO i/c Marching Reliefs throughout many a wintry German night.

The blackboard, with the names of SUS and close arrest men up there. Close arrest men deprived of belts, ties, boot laces and anything else which might be a suicidal ligature, Also the names of Confined to Barracks/RoP men who were to turn up at Last Post and Reveille dressed in best BD drill order.

The early calls book which stank of cooking fat, picked up from the Earlies cook who signed it every morning.

The Unusual Occurrences Book, which contained all the most boring, regular, repetitive events.

The Picquet Officer visiting the Guardroom and signing the Guard Report.

SUS being rifted up to the cookhouse for meals, Close Arrest men trying to keep up with loose boots and trousers falling down, straight to the front of the queue, special separated tables, gobble gobble.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
I am picking up from this thread that SUS (Soldiers Under Sentence) of 28 days or less are no longer confined in unit guardroom. Is that right ?

Oh for the days of taking over the Guardroom and signing for "the live bodies" of several miscreants. They made tea for the Guard Commander and NCO i/c Marching Reliefs throughout many a wintry German night.

The blackboard, with the names of SUS and close arrest men up there. Close arrest men deprived of belts, ties, boot laces and anything else which might be a suicidal ligature, Also the names of Confined to Barracks/RoP men who were to turn up at Last Post and Reveille dressed in best BD drill order.

The early calls book which stank of cooking fat, picked up from the Earlies cook who signed it every morning.

The Unusual Occurrences Book, which contained all the most boring, regular, repetitive events.

The Picquet Officer visiting the Guardroom and signing the Guard Report.

SUS being rifted up to the cookhouse for meals, Close Arrest men trying to keep up with loose boots and trousers falling down, straight to the front of the queue, special separated tables, gobble gobble.

From memory, all that changed over 20 years ago.

RMAS disciplinary punishments tend to be ROPs (marked by having to wear a special belt - not that they have many privileges at the moment since they're all already gated), show parades, extra duties, that sort of thing. If more serious matters are involved they can be back-termed or fail to commission.

Anyone for gazpacho? It is a dish best served cold.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
EXCLUSIVE. Leaked footage from the other week:

 
Couple questions for the older types... in the days of unit detention, did RMAS have any cells in their guardroom?

Wayyy back in the 1980s, I was told that at some point, they'd decided that they were going to jail every Cadet on a course for something (easy things at first, like "being idle! on my lovely Square"; and reaching "having untidy earlobes" or similar to sweep up the last few hard-to-catch overachievers).

The alleged idea being to give the Officer Cadets an idea of the correct way to handle double-off-to-the-loving-arms-of-Provost-Sergeant, and to understand what a properly-run guardroom looked like from the inside, the better to equip young 2Lt Snodgrass for his first turn at Orderly Officer and inspecting the Soldiers Under Sentence. Or something.

This may have been urban myth, duty rumour, or just utter bollocks - but it sounded plausible.

Meanwhile, the nearest I got to "lock him up" as an OCdt was when an utter arse of a UOTC 2Lt was handed off to the loving care of us in the Pipes and Drums (because we'd been jiffed to provide the Guard on the night of the unit barbecue. C**ts). On the bright side, he was drunk, obnoxious, had taken a swing at someone and missed, and got bundled into a cell with a certain degree of... "don't even think it". Noisy twat shouted for a while, until he realised we didn't take him seriously. And when the Orderly Officer came to visit, there was a certain amount of joy in two of us with pick helves entering the cell first to stand between duty 2Lt and the arse***e... both silently thinking "please, you wanker, try it". Not exactly the most professionally or competently conducted situation (just enthusiastic amateurism), but maximum force / minimum violence, as Dad always said. Said arsehole sobered up, emerged without any bruises or reason for complaint, straight into the CO's office for his interview without coffee...
 
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Do Officers ever actually end up at Colly?

I seem to recall an Infantry Lt, maybe 1WFR, banged up for setting his dog on recruits at an ITC.
 

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