Ex Signals now National Guard Plumber

I take that part back then! Although I’m only going off of what I was told when I went to the careers office and what MOS were available to the reserves.
If you don't live on one of the Pacific islands, it's not even worth the recruiter mentioning it. The 442nd is kept on the federal rolls more out of heritage.
 
If you don't live on one of the Pacific islands, it's not even worth the recruiter mentioning it. The 442nd is kept on the federal rolls more out of heritage.
Weren't the 442nd originally raised in WWII from mainly Japanese-Americans? Memory says they were the most highly decorated unit of their size in the US Army in WWII.
 
You are correct, I know nothing about it, but to rank them as you did indicates you either experienced all of them or you made it up.

Now it’s really not for me to say either way, you big walt.
Two out of four. Who’s the Walt now…? Dimgerr for The Win.

And for those of us who are actually serving in those branches, it’s common knowledge. But figuring that you and yours profess to knowing EVERYTHING in the world about .MIL in every country…
FO you dumbass.

57D898CD-78A8-43F8-AB70-5613C8449C58.jpeg
 
What is the training committment? Is there such a thing as a 'parade night', in the British fashion?
Depends very much on rank and unit.
The standard is one weekend a month, two weeks a year, though you can get away without the two weeks and still have a 'good year' if you've a reason to be excused.

My unit is so far from everywhere that's it's a day's travel to get there (And another to get back. Over 500 miles each way, and I'm not the furthest). As a result, we generally do a week or two every two or three months instead. Then there are courses which are longer than those commitments, starting, obviously, with several months for basic training, but various skills courses, promotion courses etc often also exceed the 2-weeks per year.

It is very rare that a training meeting will be for one day only. One evening only is all but unheard of. (And pointless, anything less than 150 miles from the unit is considered 'local' by Dept of Defense policy).

At higher ranks, you're always 'on call' as it were. I routinely take an hour or two out of my workweek during business hours to deal with unit matters, and one or two evenings a month are taken up doing briefings, reports, etc, plus other random bits. As soon as I'm done with this post, I have to open up the Army laptop and sign some paperwork sent to me by my staff. Of course, this extra work is all unpaid.
 
Depends very much on rank and unit.
The standard is one weekend a month, two weeks a year, though you can get away without the two weeks and still have a 'good year' if you've a reason to be excused.

My unit is so far from everywhere that's it's a day's travel to get there (And another to get back. Over 500 miles each way, and I'm not the furthest). As a result, we generally do a week or two every two or three months instead. Then there are courses which are longer than those commitments, starting, obviously, with several months for basic training, but various skills courses, promotion courses etc often also exceed the 2-weeks per year.

It is very rare that a training meeting will be for one day only. One evening only is all but unheard of. (And pointless, anything less than 150 miles from the unit is considered 'local' by Dept of Defense policy).

At higher ranks, you're always 'on call' as it were. I routinely take an hour or two out of my workweek during business hours to deal with unit matters, and one or two evenings a month are taken up doing briefings, reports, etc, plus other random bits. As soon as I'm done with this post, I have to open up the Army laptop and sign some paperwork sent to me by my staff. Of course, this extra work is all unpaid.
The absolute minimum here is twenty eight days per year, although most blokes (and girls) do a lot more. Generally split into a number of weekends and a two week annual camp. Compulsory training tests also have to be completed and that qualifies the soldier for the 'bounty', a tax free annual bonus. Those that do the minimum days and qualify at the last knockings are generally known as bounty hunters.
 
Two out of four. Who’s the Walt now…? Dimgerr for The Win.

So not all of them then.

This could get quite amusing if you go down the avenue of accusing me of being a walt, so crack on fella.
 

Dodgy-Engr

Old-Salt
In 2012 I was on an exchange exercise with the South Dakota National Guard and made some friends who i am still in touch with ten years later.

The funniest experiences I had was a bunch of Nigerians in the Navy Guard arguing till they were blue in the face that they were actually from Dallas, Texas and the look on a Guardsman's face when I informed him that he was speaking my language and not the other way around.

A good trip all in all.

I would join it for shits n giggles!
 
Enjoyed reading the initial post,apologies haven’t read all five pages.
So you’re a Brit, who married an American, meaning you qualified to join the US military? I didn’t realise you could join that way.
How many days do you do in the National Guard? Is it good pay in comparison to hear? What’s the retirement age?
 
And there is the problem. British reserves, effectively, do three weeks recruit training, infantry do five weeks. It's nowhere near enough, but no politician has got the balls to bring in septic style training. And on top of that, employers would never go for it.
How were you treated, regarding your previous and you're Englandcestershire accent?

When we were in Florida and the global war on terror had been going for around 10 years the Mrs told me about a bloke who had turned up out of the blue at her office. He introduced himself and said, "I'm Baaaack".

She checked the records and true enough he had been given an indefinite leave of absence by the bank to fcuk off and fight bad men. He was, of all things, a call centre operative so the wife contacted the lady who ran the call centre, they re-onboarded him and set him back to answering the phones. I can't remember how long he had been away but, it was something like 6 years. Long enough to move up from being a newly minted major to becoming a one star. He did not stay at the bank for very long as he was offered something else more in keeping with his new rank by someone else.

Try doing that in the UK. The bank used to whinge when the Mrs let people go off to be a soldier for six months.
 
When we were in Florida and the global war on terror had been going for around 10 years the Mrs told me about a bloke who had turned up out of the blue at her office. He introduced himself and said, "I'm Baaaack".

She checked the records and true enough he had been given an indefinite leave of absence by the bank to fcuk off and fight bad men. He was, of all things, a call centre operative so the wife contacted the lady who ran the call centre, they re-onboarded him and set him back to answering the phones. I can't remember how long he had been away but, it was something like 6 years. Long enough to move up from being a newly minted major to becoming a one star. He did not stay at the bank for very long as he was offered something else more in keeping with his new rank by someone else.

Try doing that in the UK. The bank used to whinge when the Mrs let people go off to be a soldier for six months.

Yes different ethos over there. The military is respected in the States, where as here most people don’t really care.
As for the Army Reserves , again,over here for employers letting people go on tours is a headache. I couldn’t imagine any company letting someone go away for 6 years then walk straight back into their old job!
 
As soon as I'm done with this post, I have to open up the Army laptop and sign some paperwork sent to me by my staff. Of course, this extra work is all unpaid.
There used to be a small stipend that the Army Reserve paid to unit commanders for just such reasons, because commanding an Army Reserve unit means a lot of detail work has to be done "off the clock" to ensure a successful Battle Assembly. As far as I know though, this small amount was discontinued after FY 89. My friend the Captain, still grumbles about this loss to this day. I don't know what the Guard does because that is State run and the States have a funny way of doing business; they even have their own regulations concerning certain subjects.
 
Enjoyed reading the initial post,apologies haven’t read all five pages.
So you’re a Brit, who married an American, meaning you qualified to join the US military? I didn’t realise you could join that way.
How many days do you do in the National Guard? Is it good pay in comparison to hear? What’s the retirement age?
We were married for nearly a year by the time the visa application was processed (green card). You can join the military in America just on your permanent work visa green card thing but you cannot do a fair amount of jobs.

It’s two days a month, I haven’t been doing it that long just thought I’d share my experiences of training in comparison to my time back home.
The pay covers the health insurance so I sort of do it for nothing sort of do it to prevent having to pay thousands in deductibles. I’ve been here two years, I still don’t understand healthcare I just know that military health insurance is worth the hassle. Retirement is points based with the guard, there’s people on this post that have much more knowledge than me when it comes to this but I think it’s 30 years service for 40% of your last paycheck? I had a finance brief in phase 2 training and that’s all I sort of remember and as you can imagine I spent the majority of it watching YouTube hiding up the back.
 
We were married for nearly a year by the time the visa application was processed (green card). You can join the military in America just on your permanent work visa green card thing but you cannot do a fair amount of jobs.

It’s two days a month, I haven’t been doing it that long just thought I’d share my experiences of training in comparison to my time back home.
The pay covers the health insurance so I sort of do it for nothing sort of do it to prevent having to pay thousands in deductibles. I’ve been here two years, I still don’t understand healthcare I just know that military health insurance is worth the hassle. Retirement is points based with the guard, there’s people on this post that have much more knowledge than me when it comes to this but I think it’s 30 years service for 40% of your last paycheck? I had a finance brief in phase 2 training and that’s all I sort of remember and as you can imagine I spent the majority of it watching YouTube hiding up the back.
Are there many Brits to your knowledge?
 
Are there many Brits to your knowledge?
Funnily enough there was a Glaswegian at my plumber training who had moved to America after getting married to a yank through online video games so that was surprising, he hadn’t been in back home though. Being British is one of the hardest nationalities to be when it comes to emigrating to the US. The usual type of Brit that comes to America is one of those edumacated types so I can’t see a reason/need/want to join the armed forces. I just keep doing it because I’m slightly thick.
 

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