Even the Telegraph's lying.

SignalFire

Old-Salt
Erm...



Even the youth wing uses one...

atc-cap-badge.jpg
That's the Hitler youth one right?
 
It looks like the sort of symbol created by some banana republic - such as UDI Rhodesia.
What, the banana republic that was the breadbasket of Africa. Where the Rhodesian dollar had parity with the pound in 1980. Which had full employment and didn't take a penny in foreign aid unlike its successor. Is that the banana republic you mean?

Lots of modern banana republics in Africa and elsewhere, foremost of which would be modern day Zimbabwe and the citizens of ANC run South Africa would love to have the economy of Rhodesia from 1965 to 1980.
 
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I don't like this cap badge at all.- but it sums up the half baked thinking behind the concept.

The eagle - of whatever species -is not a symbol much used by the British Army. It is not a symbol that features in the heraldry of our royal family or of the nations that make up the United Kingdom.

The British Army has always fought against armies with the eagle as a cap badge - Napoleonic France - Im perial Germany - Nazi Germany and the USA. The cavalry regiments with eagle cap badges were either awarded them as some diplomatic favour (14/20th or QDG - or as a trophy: Scots DG) There is a good reason for this: Romer. Imperial France and Imperial and Nazi Germany wanted to identfy themselves as the inheritors of the Holy Roman Empire in dominating Europe, while the US founding fathers were inspired by Republican Rome.

It looks like the sort of symbol created by some banana republic - such as UDI Rhodesia..... The similarity with to the Selous Scouts is unfortunate. Is this an association that will win Britian freinds across the globe?

The moder term Rangers is used by the armed forces of many nations as a copy of the US Rangers. But the US picked the term rangers (aided by Dudley Clarke) for their version of the Army Commandos. So Logically there is an existing capbadge for the Rangers concept.....
[lmg]https://images.app.goo.gl/UQWZ5h56YzguCmUB9[/lmg]
The commando daggger is not used as a cap badge - though SS might be misinterpretated... But that raises the issue of what exactly distinguishs "Rangers" From the other elites - paras, SAS, RM Commandos....

Going back to the origins of Rangers, there are two units which pioneered the use of the name Rangers in the C18th. In the Seven Years War, Roger's Rangers cap badeg was a circle with the name Rogers Rangers. Their successor which fought against them in the American Revolution were the Queen's Rangers. Their cap badge was a shield with the name of the unit, surmounted by a queen's crown
U3Ea3euPJhHsa8M4A


A far better badge, firmly British ands arguably a better title. The Queen's Rangers has a more British ring to it.
Your image links don't seem to work, but here's some Wiki images of the Queen's Rangers.

530px-A_Light_Infantry_Man_and_Huzzar_of_the_Queen%27s_Rangers%2C_ca_1780.jpg


499px-A_Rifleman_of_the_Queen%27s_Ranger%2C_ca._1780.png


Here's from another source.
military7p5.jpg


There's your cap badge and uniform sorted.


According to Forces.net (BFBS) the name "Rangers" is supposed to hark back to the Queen's Rangers.
Ranger Regiment: What we know about the Army's new elite unit

History of the 'Rangers'

According to the British Army, the Ranger Regiment's name comes from an 18th century unit that saw action in North America, using "irregular tactics".
The first Ranger groupings fought in the French and Indian War, between 1754 and 1763, including the unit of Robert Rogers, who wrote '28 Rules of Ranging'.

These early units specialised in "unconventional warfare", such as forest ranging, and environments usually inaccessible to other forces, as well as carrying out reconnaissance roles.

Rangers were also used by both sides during the American War of Independence, with Robert Rogers' unit eventually evolving into a British Army regiment, the Queen's Rangers.

Following that conflict and loss of the North American colonies, the British Army was without a suitable environment to employ a ranger unit, and the ranging capability ceased to exist in the same way.

In 1800, the Experimental Rifle Corps was formed, carrying some of the skills deployed in North America.

According to the Army, regiments which incorporated the 'Ranger' name over the following decades included: Central London Rangers, The Connaught Rangers, The Royal Irish Rangers, and The Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry.

Today, a 'Ranger' is a term used to describe a Royal Irish Regiment soldier, although the term's meaning differs from the original "unconventional warfare" definition.

The Queen's York Rangers in Canada trace their history back to the Queen's Rangers as well.
The Queen's York Rangers (1st American Regiment) (RCAC)
The Rangers traces its history back to the Seven Years War when Robert Rogers raised the Queen’s Rangers to defend British North America against the French and their Indigenous Allies in the 1750s. The Rangers also fought against the Americans during the War of Independence, defeating General George Washington at the Battle of Brandywine in 1777. Later, the unit founded Toronto (1790s) and fought alongside Indigenous Allies in the War of 1812. The Rangers also deployed during the North West Rebellion (1880s) and The Great War (1914-18 ).

I'm not an expert in heraldry, but what the new UK cap badge reminds me of is something artistically inspired by Judge Dredd comics. Something a bit more traditionally inspired might sit better with well, traditionalists.
 
Erm...

cc-rafcrest-pb_detail.jpg
flat,750x,075,f-pad,750x1000,f8f8f8.jpg


Even the youth wing uses one...

atc-cap-badge.jpg
a bit confused here.
The Verb 'fight' and RAF have been used in the same post
was that intentional?
 

exsniffer

War Hero
Erm...

cc-rafcrest-pb_detail.jpg
flat,750x,075,f-pad,750x1000,f8f8f8.jpg


Even the youth wing uses one...

atc-cap-badge.jpg
I am fairly sure that is an Albatross not an Eagle

I also thought that we were considering cap badges of military organizations
 
I am fairly sure that is an Albatross not an Eagle

I also thought that we were considering cap badges of military organizations
That's not a species that is adapting to change

Very apt!
The albatross rangers
 
I can imagine the rank and file filing off the lances to revert it, in the style of Scots DG, after Grey's and Carabiniers amalgamated, filing off the carbines. As told to me by a Scots DG about 1980.
Would be a bit difficult, the lances are cloth sewn onto the beret, the skull and crossbones being an actual badge on top of them
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Would be a bit difficult, the lances are cloth sewn onto the beret, the skull and crossbones being an actual badge on top of them
So the actual badge motto remains unchanged since 17/21L? 17L? 21L?
 
What, the banana republic that was the breadbasket of Africa. Where the Rhodesian dollar had parity with the pound in 1980. Which had full employment and didn't take a penny in foreign aid unlike its successor. Is that the banana republic you mean?

Lots of modern banana republics in Africa and elsewhere, foremost of which would be modern day Zimbabwe and the citizens of ANC run South Africa would love to have the economy of Rhodesia from 1965 to 1980.
I can only give you one excellent for that.
I will admit I cheered when Rhodesia became Zimbabwe.
I have made quite a few mistakes in my life.
 
What, the banana republic that was the breadbasket of Africa. Where the Rhodesian dollar had parity with the pound in 1980. Which had full employment and didn't take a penny in foreign aid unlike its successor. Is that the banana republic you mean?

Lots of modern banana republics in Africa and elsewhere, foremost of which would be modern day Zimbabwe and the citizens of ANC run South Africa would love to have the economy of Rhodesia from 1965 to 1980.
Name the first President of Zimbabwe
 

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