European Union joins the lineup, staking claim to Arctic res

#1
BRUSSELS, Belgium — The European Union gave notice Thursday it is keen to have a share of the much sought after oil, gas, mineral and fish resources in the Arctic region as the polar ice cap melts.
The move is likely to irk other Arctic players, including Canada, Russia, Norway and the United States all of which have issued territorial claims in the polar region.
The European Commission said the 27-member bloc, which has three member states in the polar region - Denmark, Finland and Sweden - should get involved in the current rush in the Arctic, notably in offshore oil and gas exploitation.
Denmark controls the semiautonomous territory of Greenland.
The announcement was part of a first outline of priorities the EU is seeking in the Arctic, an area where the bloc is now planting its own flag of sorts as a key economic and security interest for Europe.
"The Arctic is a unique and vulnerable region located in the immediate vicinity of Europe," said EU External Relations Commissioner Benita Ferrero Waldner.
"Its evolution will have significant repercussions on the life of Europeans for generations to come."
She added that the quickly changing Arctic posed new challenges and opportunities for EU states and as such the bloc needed to formulate a policy for the region.
Interest in the Arctic is intensifying because global warming is shrinking the polar ice and that could someday open up resource development and new shipping lanes.
Ferrero Waldner stressed however, that any EU moves in the region would not endanger the local environment or local native populations.
"The EU is ready ... to keep the right balance between the priority goal of preserving the environment and the need for sustainable use of natural resources," she said.
Ferrero-Waldner said recent U.S. surveys "estimate that up to 25 per cent of the planet's undiscovered oil and gas could be located" in the region.
A share of that would help the EU bloc ease its heavy reliance on Russian oil and gas imports.
European involvement is sure to add weight to Arctic claims filed by Denmark.
Danish officials are gathering scientific evidence to show that the Lomonosov Ridge, a 2,000-kilometre underwater mountain range, is attached to Greenland, making it a geological extension of the island.
Canada and Denmark also both claim Hans Island, a 1.3-square-kilometre rock at the entrance to the Northwest Passage. The island is wedged between Canada's Ellesmere Island and Danish-ruled Greenland, and has been a subject of bitter exchanges between the two NATO allies.
The new EU strategy, which will be debated by EU governments in coming months, foresees a stepped up role by EU officials in the eight-country Arctic Council as well as part of the United Nations' Law of the Sea Convention which is trying to settle claims over the Arctic.
Ferrero-Waldner said that acting through these means, the EU as a whole will be able to have a greater say over the Arctic's future.
Countries involved in the claims recommitted themselves last May to settle competing claims under the UN convention. A UN panel is supposed to decide on control of the Arctic by 2020.
However, Russia and Canada have already moved to flex their muscle over their claims by holding military exercises in the Arctic.
Russia last year sent two small submarines to plant a tiny national flag under the North Pole, while Ottawa has announced plans to build a new army training centre and a deep-water port in contested Arctic waters.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/can...GG1XG6ApGStimg
:twisted: .....I won't comment because since I'm a little more pro-EU then many (most?) on here I keep talking myself into arguments :oops: ....I just thought it was interesting.
 
#3
I swear if there is ever an excuse for another world war it must surely be to destroy this abhorrent trough licking institute of free loading scumbags.

Any time next next year would be fine once we recover the lads from Telic.

Fackin scum the lot of them!
 
#4
I was just saying, I prefer a Whiskey, I have a glass of McCallan warming in the hand now, a MacPhail bottling of the 30yr, much better value than the true sherry cask bottlings.
From the top Whiskey shop - Robertson's of Pitlochry, I am unable to drive past it on the road true north.
Super little butchers there too... can't bring the name to mind though...
 
#5
Robertson's, that's the fellow, a grand beef man.
Cuts a wonderful tenderloin of haggis too, very tasty if you know how to hang the buggers, plucked on the field to prevent bird flu at the stables..
NOT Robertson's, Robertson's is the whiskey chap.. what I mean to say is, McDonald Brothers, charming family, cobbles on the road.
I'm pretty sure the old Queen consort, bless her, was a taker of McDonald's haggis.
Very nice too .. nestled, or rather squating, on a bed of neeps and tatties.
Lovely young lady in the local tonight, blue suit, Chanel I'll be bound, or Lanvin, very Grace Kelly you see, saucy young witch.
 
#6
I’ve just returned from the local hostelry, a very good pint of Tangle-tongue, clean pipework, good cellar man. Poor lighting… Which reminds me..
Charming young filly at the bar, (with an oaf of a chap,) bottom like a boy-scout….
Very pleasing. Apparently she works in a new development in the town, in the Café Rouge.
Must pop in for a snifter tomorrow lunchtime.
 
#9
So basically the EU is trying to elbow its way in and big itself up? If I was one of those three countries I'd be wondering what the EU was up to since why should Portugal or Slovakia be getting a say in their territorial disputes. Now if it's done as a way of getting the rest of the EU behind and supporting the positions that they decide rather than 'formulate a [EU] policy' and try and make them follow that then it could be a good thing but I remain skeptical.
 
#10
Brick said:
So basically the EU is trying to elbow its way in and big itself up? . . . .
Yep . . I might hate the fat, corrupt and undemocratic leviathan that is the EU, but that's the whole point. We're way too small individually to have an impact in the argument but as a group we can work on the scale that the big guys do.

Let's hope that they are as keen to join in when the arguing starts over the resources in the Antarctic. I never viewed the Falklands conflict as being about sovereignty, it was about the strategic importance of the Cape Horn and the resources that lie beyond and which one day we will be fighting over.

The EU does have some uses other than being a financial vehicle for the Kinnock family you see.
 
#11
How can the EU stake a claim in anything as it isnt a nation state?
Can we have our war now!
 
#12
GordonBrown said:
How can the EU stake a claim in anything as it isn't a nation state? . . .
Not yet it isn't . . only a matter of time . . once they've overcome the 'Irish Problem.'

They'll probably just throw their weight behind those nation states that do have a claim to make sure they have the best chance. It's all in the Super-States interest in the long term after all.
 
#13
ericthellama said:
Brick said:
So basically the EU is trying to elbow its way in and big itself up? . . . .
Yep . . I might hate the fat, corrupt and undemocratic leviathan that is the EU, but that's the whole point. We're way too small individually to have an impact in the argument but as a group we can work on the scale that the big guys do.

Let's hope that they are as keen to join in when the arguing starts over the resources in the Antarctic. I never viewed the Falklands conflict as being about sovereignty, it was about the strategic importance of the Cape Horn and the resources that lie beyond and which one day we will be fighting over.

The EU does have some uses other than being a financial vehicle for the Kinnock family you see.
We're big enough, and more importantly wealthy enough, to do whatever we want, if we had the political will. It is, of course, perfectly possible to hand over our international interests and responsibilities to someone else. It's just a shyte thing to do.
 
#14
ericthellama said:
GordonBrown said:
How can the EU stake a claim in anything as it isn't a nation state? . . .
Not yet it isn't . . only a matter of time . . once they've overcome the 'Irish Problem.'

They'll probably just throw their weight behind those nation states that do have a claim to make sure they have the best chance. It's all in the Super-States interest in the long term after all.
Yes, that old democracy and voting thing, I can see why they have a problem there.
 
#15
angular said:
We're big enough, and more importantly wealthy enough, to do whatever we want, if we had the political will. It is, of course, perfectly possible to hand over our international interests and responsibilities to someone else. It's just a shyte thing to do.
I don't think we are big enough and we're certainly not wealthy enough to do whatever we want. You may have missed that little Credit Crunch thing but even before that we have spent all the pennies in the piggy bank. Just because Mr.Brown says he's going to borrow our way out of the problem doesn't mean he's found anyone to lend us the money. We're overstretched and underfunded militarily and our global influence has shrunk to that of a third world nation. We just don't have the clout the we used to.

We handed over our international interests and responsibilities decades ago. No use crying over spilt milk though, I suggest that we make the most of the shyte situation we've let ourselves be led into.
 
#16
Is this the same EU that's led by the National failures of Europe ?
My, my I grew up, in a Britain that was being encouraged to give up get out of the overseas territories game and now this bunch of something that is not even a Nation State (as Gorden Brown says) wants to go Empire building.
Mustn't be any shooty gunny bit or they wouldn't be interested.
john
 

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