Eurofighter crash - Italy

#3
RIP



BREAKING: Italian Air Force Test Pilot Perishes In Mishap At Terracina Air Show ? Avgeekery.com ? News and stories by Aviation Professionals

On Sunday September 24th 2017, 36 year-old Aeronautica Militare Italiana (AMI- Italian Air Force) Captain and test pilot Gabriele Orlandi was flying a demonstration routine in a Eurofighter F-2000A Typhoon fighter while participating in the Terracina Airshow located about 30 miles southeast of Rome on the Italian west coast. The pilot was reportedly flying F-2000A serial number MM7278 / AMI code RS-23 and assigned to the AMI’s Reparto Sperimentale Volo (RSV or Test Wing).

Orlandi’s demonstration flight appeared to spectators to be entirely routine until the jet reached the bottom of an elongated loop maneuver and was unable to recover from its dive at the bottom of the maneuver. As a result, the Typhoon crashed into the sea and disintegrated approximately 400 yards offshore at 1700 local time. The pilot was killed on impact, failing to even attempt to eject from the aircraft prior to making catastrophic contact with the water. The pilot’s body was recovered at sea 90 minutes after the mishap.

The show’s next and final scheduled performance, by Italy’s Frecce Tricolore precision flight demonstration team, was canceled. No cause has yet been determined for the crash, which now is under investigation.........
 
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DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
Has anyone got an explanation/speculation as to why the driver didn't eject? Was he already brown bread, or did he flakey in the curve? Could that be a possibility?

MsG
 
#5
Has anyone got an explanation/speculation as to why the driver didn't eject? Was he already brown bread, or did he flakey in the curve? Could that be a possibility?

MsG
He was too busy
 
#6
Possibly, or possibly not. I realise that this is a rumour service but that's all for a Board of Inquiry to investigate.
 
#7
Brexit, surely?


Flippancy aside, there is doubtless some Owen Jones-alike out there in the remain camp that would argue that it was clearly the case.
 
#7
The record for fastest transfer from Air Force to Submarine Service goes to...
 
#8
Commiserations to family and friends.

The routine appeared to be close to limits which may have been inadvertently exceeded.

This can be somewhat unforgiving.
 
#9
Commiserations to family and friends.

The routine appeared to be close to limits which may have been inadvertently exceeded.

This can be somewhat unforgiving.
There used to be this old aircraft-based shoot 'em up called G-LOC. The title stood for G-force induced loss of consciousness. I thought for a while that the makers of the game were full of crap before I went reading about it in the library. (This was decades before the internet was really a thing)

This may have happened to that poor pilot.
 
#11
RIP.

For comparison, here's a near-miss at RIAT a few years back:

 
#12
Has anyone got an explanation/speculation as to why the driver didn't eject? Was he already brown bread, or did he flakey in the curve? Could that be a possibility?

MsG
If only the government had an organisation to investigate air accidents then we wouldn't have to rely on ARRSE. They could call it "The Air Accidents Investigation Branch" or something Italian like "Agenzia Nazionale per la Sicurezza del Volo".
 
#13
Has anyone got an explanation/speculation as to why the driver didn't eject? Was he already brown bread, or did he flakey in the curve? Could that be a possibility?

MsG
When crashes like this occur, they conduct things called investigations (see here),

in·ves·ti·ga·tion
[in-ves-ti-gey-shuhn]
NOUN
1.
the act or process of investigating or the condition of being investigated.
2.
a searching inquiry for ascertaining facts; detailed or careful examination.

Until the said investigation reports it's findings speculative comments are frowned upon as to not compound the grief of the deceased's family and friends.

I suggest you refain from inane speculation on here for that reason.
 
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#14
...the mongs are out early in this thread....

 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#15
Many of the crashes at air displays seem to be while the aircraft is doing a loop de loop, so why

  1. Can't pilots do these safely?
  2. Are they not banned if they are so unsafe?
 
#16
Many of the crashes at air displays seem to be while the aircraft is doing a loop de loop, so why

  1. Can't pilots do these safely?
  2. Are they not banned if they are so unsafe?
Bread and circuses.
 
#17
Many of the crashes at air displays seem to be while the aircraft is doing a loop de loop, so why

  1. Can't pilots do these safely?
  2. Are they not banned if they are so unsafe?
There is a certain line they have to follow to perform certain aerobatics to try and prevent aircraft endangering the public, I think its a line parallel to the runway but a few hundred feet further opposite the main spectators and yes, they will get banned. One of ours at Warton in DA2 or 4 did a tight turn in front of our hangar and spent a very long time flying the Hawk India Synthetic Training Equipment.

In the case of Mario here, I think out of respect for the poor chaps family he wont be receiving his ban posthumously.

Very sad and I read his parents and girlfriend were watching to.

Tragic.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#18
There is a certain line they have to follow to perform certain aerobatics to try and prevent aircraft endangering the public, I think its a line parallel to the runway but a few hundred feet further opposite the main spectators and yes, they will get banned. One of ours at Warton in DA2 or 4 did a tight turn in front of our hangar and spent a very long time flying the Hawk India Synthetic Training Equipment.

In the case of Mario here, I think out of respect for the poor chaps family he wont be receiving his ban posthumously.

Very sad and I read his parents and girlfriend were watching to.

Tragic.
That restriction is, quite rightly, to protect the audience - what about protecting the pilot by banning loops?
 
#19
That restriction is, quite rightly, to protect the audience - what about protecting the pilot by banning loops?
Or airshows and air to air combat?

The cause will be found but the display is usually very well planned, if the pilot follows the display plan then aside from aircraft issues, nature (bird strikes) or atmospheric anomalies, it shouldn't be 'that' dangerous.

I think a lot of these guys ride the planes in because they think they can recover it, they are a different breed.
 
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#20
Many of the crashes at air displays seem to be while the aircraft is doing a loop de loop, so why

  1. Can't pilots do these safely?
  2. Are they not banned if they are so unsafe?
Wah shield up -
Loops are perfectly safe if the manoeuvre is started at sufficient height above the unforgiving earth .
Why ban anything that's deemed unsafe ? Smoking still kills more a year than 50 years worth of aviation related crashes
In the case of Shoreham the actual manoeuvre was not the issue.....it was all the other factors surrounding it......as is the case in most crashes .
And down -
Good job all those WW2 Biggles types were not restrained by Elf and Safety
 

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