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EU threatens Tanks!

#1
From the Torygraph. could be rubbish, but with the EU you never know!

'Noise at work' rules threaten to knock out Army's tanks
By Thomas Harding, Defence Correspondent
(Filed: 02/09/2005)

Defence chiefs are fighting to prevent the Army's tanks being stopped in their tracks by the introduction of a European directive on vibration and noise at work.

The Control of Vibration at Work Regulations and the Control of Noise at Work Regulations have left officers scrambling to discover if the military's armoured vehicles break the rules.
But with a slim chance of reducing vibrations in a Challenger 2 tank and the Warrior armoured vehicles, the Ministry of Defence will be seeking an exemption from the rules by invoking an "opt-out" clause. Soldiers who travel in the back of tanks and are subjected to substantial jolts and constant noise will have to suffer the discomforts until at least 2010 when the regulations become law.
"Because it's damaging to the human body we are out to ensure soldiers are looked after like civilians," an MoD official said. "Where necessary and practical we will modify equipment and we do have the opt out which we will use if necessary."
Defence contractors have been given funds to find ways of improving conditions for soldiers in tanks, including the introduction of better seats and rubber band tracks.
A risk assessment study is also expected to be carried out on all the Army's armoured fighting vehicles to establish if they comply with the regulations.
The new rules, introduced under the European Physical Agents Directive, are aimed at cutting the estimated two million injuries of "hand-arm vibration" or "whole body vibration". The rules will also limit the use of machinery such as pneumatic drills, chainsaws and farm equipment.
A spokesman for the Health and Safety Executive, which is implementing the legislation, said "national security" considerations could mean certain employers were exempt.
"If you are in a combat situation then clearly it will be difficult to bring in these regulations," he added.
 
#2
Plastic Yank said:
From the Torygraph. could be rubbish, but with the EU you never know!

'Noise at work' rules threaten to knock out Army's tanks
By Thomas Harding, Defence Correspondent
(Filed: 02/09/2005)

Defence chiefs are fighting to prevent the Army's tanks being stopped in their tracks by the introduction of a European directive on vibration and noise at work.

The Control of Vibration at Work Regulations and the Control of Noise at Work Regulations have left officers scrambling to discover if the military's armoured vehicles break the rules.
But with a slim chance of reducing vibrations in a Challenger 2 tank and the Warrior armoured vehicles, the Ministry of Defence will be seeking an exemption from the rules by invoking an "opt-out" clause. Soldiers who travel in the back of tanks and are subjected to substantial jolts and constant noise will have to suffer the discomforts until at least 2010 when the regulations become law.
"Because it's damaging to the human body we are out to ensure soldiers are looked after like civilians," an MoD official said. "Where necessary and practical we will modify equipment and we do have the opt out which we will use if necessary."
Defence contractors have been given funds to find ways of improving conditions for soldiers in tanks, including the introduction of better seats and rubber band tracks.
A risk assessment study is also expected to be carried out on all the Army's armoured fighting vehicles to establish if they comply with the regulations.
The new rules, introduced under the European Physical Agents Directive, are aimed at cutting the estimated two million injuries of "hand-arm vibration" or "whole body vibration". The rules will also limit the use of machinery such as pneumatic drills, chainsaws and farm equipment.
A spokesman for the Health and Safety Executive, which is implementing the legislation, said "national security" considerations could mean certain employers were exempt.
"If you are in a combat situation then clearly it will be difficult to bring in these regulations," he added.
No. All true. There is another thread on this running, but I'm too lazy to find it.
 
G

Goku

Guest
#3
A spokesman for the Health and Safety Executive, which is implementing the legislation, said "national security" considerations could mean certain employers were exempt.
It looks as if they’re actually being sensible about this new law, no threat to our tanks then it appears.
 
#5
sandmanfez said:
Just as a point of interest, does anyone know if the new French "Leclerc" is significantly less prone to vibration than the Chally?
Apparently only if reverse gear is selected, which by all accounts is most of the time..................... :D
 
#6
I only ever got to 'play' with CH1 and an early pre-production Leclerc (1981). From memory, I didn't notice a significant difference - but then I had been a Chieftain operator! Slightly off, but in the early 80s, on the tracked side of things, I also managed cabbies in M1 Abrams, Leo 2, Vickers Valiant, the articulated Swedish UDES XIX (I think, or it may have been the XX), the Brazilian Osorio, Italian OF40 and T-62. I was set at one time to visit Israel to have a good look over the Merkava, but some invasion or other unpleasantness in the region forced cancellation of the trip.
 
#7
Am I the only one worried that the French tank shares its name with one of the biggest French supermarkets? I for one have no intention in the world of crossing the LOD in a Challenger Tesco....
 
#8
Actually it's named after General Jacques Leclerc, one of the first officers to join De Gaulle and who commanded the French 2eme Division Blindee in North West Europe
 
#10
baboon6 said:
Actually it's named after General Jacques Leclerc, one of the first officers to join De Gaulle and who commanded the French 2eme Division Blindee in North West Europe
And here's me thinking it was an 'Allo 'Allo fan in the French government having a laugh :(
 

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