Ethical consumerism and the "Chicken Out" campaign.

Do you support ethical consumerism in general, and the "Chicken Out" campaign in particula

  • Yes. Animals should, so far as is reasonably practicable, be reared in a humane manner.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No. Although, I empathise with intensively reared livestock, the alternative is prohibitively expen

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No. Its just a chicken!

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
#1
Anyone currently UK based, who owns a television, and doesn't live in a cave, will probably be aware of Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's "Chicken Out" campaign.
For those lucky enough to live in conditions of blissful isolation and/or ignorance, the details are as follows:-

Do you know about the life your fresh supermarket chickens led before they reached the table?

Few people know about the conditions suffered by most broiler chickens - those reared for meat.

95% of the chicken eaten in the UK has been intensively farmed.

Farmers are under pressure to produce poultry as quickly and cheaply as possible - which means birds live short lives, in cramped conditions, without ever seeing natural daylight. They commonly develop severe injuries and disabilities, associated with unnaturally fast weight gain and restricted movement.

The plight of egg-laying, battery caged hens has received much attention in recent years, and consumers have responded, greatly reducing the proportion of bought eggs which come from intensive systems. 27% of UK egg production now comes from free range farms. Now it's time to do the same for broiler birds.
www.chickenout.tv

Without yet nailing my colours to the mast, I'm interested in the forum's views.
 
#2
Yeah, lets stop the UK Intensive farming so we can import the cheap stuff from Poland, where they really care for animals.
Its just another ploy to screw what we have, to open the doors for cheap imports.

(fcuk, I sound like a foil head tonight!)
 
#3
Northern_Biff said:
Yeah, lets stop the UK Intensive farming so we can import the cheap stuff from Poland, where they really care for animals.
Its just another ploy to screw what we have, to open the doors for cheap imports.

(fcuk, I sound like a foil head tonight!)
That was a point that one of the Battery egg producers brought up. I'd prefer to buy free range chicken/products however its not always possible.
 
#4
As a proud member of PETA (People for the Eating of Tasty Animals), I think there are more important things in this world to get bent out of shape over. However, it must be said that there is a clear taste difference between the two types of farming, so I'm going to go along with that double-barrelled hippy for reasons consistent with me being a fat cnut who likes his food.
 

Fugly

ADC
DirtyBAT
#5
It's a chicken.

If you don't like the way meat arrives in the shops, then go veggie. (Or vegan, if you are utterly wet).

Does a disabled chicken taste any different than an able one?
 
#6
I will always, if possible, buy free range. I think that meat tastes better when it has had a "happier" life. Having said that, if anyone watched the Jamie Oliver show on the same subject, I would quite happily buy chicken that has been raised in the less intensive indoor way.

I do believe that humans should eat meat and the latest "Kill it, Cook it, Eat it" series had me shouting at the telly when the rampant veggie lunatics spouted their rubbish about the cute ickle animals.

To sum up, I want any animal that I eat to a) taste as nice as possible, b) to live as good a life as possible and c) be dispatched as humanely as possible.

Tubs
 
#7
It all tastes the same in a crispy southern fried batter. Why all the fuss.

They only exist to feed us, they would have died off thousands if not millions of years ago if they were an animal in their own right.......get it on my fecking plate and stop blubbering you woosies
 
#8
I personally couldn't give a short sharp sh1t whether the dead animal on my plate was fed on beer and fellated twice daily by nubile milk-maids, or suspended upside down by barbed wire with a cricket stump lodged in it's ricker. As long as it tastes good, its' quality of life is of monumental indifference to me. Pardon my cynicism, but "Buy this piece of meat, I know it's four times the price, but I was nice to it before I killed it" doesn't wash.
 
#9
Northern_Biff said:
It all tastes the same in a crispy southern fried batter. Why all the fuss.

They only exist to feed us, they would have died off thousands if not millions of years ago if they were an animal in their own right.......get it on my fecking plate and stop blubbering you woosies
Hear hear, I like chicken and to be frank, I couldn't care less if anyone abused it before it hit my plate as long as it has the requisite calories and tastes lekker.
If you have to think about it, maybe you should be eating nut cutlets and bean feasts.....or tofu, you great Nancy's
 
#10
Tubbyboy said:
I will always, if possible, buy free range. I think that meat tastes better when it has had a "happier" life. Having said that, if anyone watched the Jamie Oliver show on the same subject, I would quite happily buy chicken that has been raised in the less intensive indoor way.

I do believe that humans should eat meat and the latest "Kill it, Cook it, Eat it" series had me shouting at the telly when the rampant veggie lunatics spouted their rubbish about the cute ickle animals.

To sum up, I want any animal that I eat to a) taste as nice as possible, b) to live as good a life as possible and c) be dispatched as humanely as possible.

Tubs

Agreed.
I would like to add a d) in that we should use as much of the carcasse as we can - least waste possible. It only adds more 'meaning' to the life of the animal. (Whoops, getting a bit touchy feely there.... whoaaa)
That means leather shoes/belts and horn buttons - yes and even cow lip/penis pate, it never killed anyone so why the hell not?

I'd also like to see a programme such as 'Kill it, Cook it, Eat it' taught in schools. Then the little chavs will know where their mcbuuuurger came from... assuming the little sods actually attended school in the first place. :x

And those 'ickle' animals are cute, but they're also dinner so bring it on please Mr Butcher! :twisted:
 
#11
It doesn't taste the same at all. In fact, there's no taste at all in any supermarket chicken, including those loudly proclaimed to be 'organic' or whatever. With Fearnley-Whittingstall on this, up to a point (but not Jamie Oliver, who seems to have jumped onto the bandwagon and who is a twat deserving a wrung neck).
 
#12
filthyphil said:
As long as it tastes good, its' quality of life is of monumental indifference to me.
Point is, healthy free-range birds DO taste better...
 
#13
I've not followed the programs properly but, honestly I think free range is a good thing, personally think it does taste better, not just the treatment issue.

That said, when Hugh whatshisname and Jamie Oliver, when speaking to the public on the issue, every time someone mentioned that they won't eat free range because they can't afford it, they almost ignored the point or looked uncomfortable and moved on.

Seems as if it's something that neither of them can defend. Even one of Hugh's "convertees" when caught by him buying cheap chicken breasts admitted that they were unable to afford free range as they had a very limited budget to shop with.
Something Hugh and Jamie don't really have to worry about.

Unless that issue is addressed (with the supermarkets who make a stupid profit on free range and organic produce - which is bollocks with a lot of organic veg especially - trendy innit) this campaign will only get so far!

Did also hear that there was a letter in one of the Sunday papers (poss the Hate on Sunday) from a battery farmer who let them film at his farm for three days, but because the conditions were good the footage didn't get used.
 
#14
Carcass said:
filthyphil said:
As long as it tastes good, its' quality of life is of monumental indifference to me.
Point is, healthy free-range birds DO taste better...
That's just a rumour. As the majority of chickens in UK, if not also elsewhere, are riddled with salmonella or other diseases, how will the consumer ever know if he has been lucky enough to get a healthy one?

It's more likely that the few remaining healthy ones are kept specially for breeding, so will never end up on a plate. A dog's bowl, perhaps, as it becomes tough during advanced age.

It surprises me that supermarkets offload so much chicken - either cooked or in those exotic nuke-at-home bags. Why not provide meals with the healthier animals?

Spoken as somebody who hasn't eaten chicken for years - because I don't like the taste mainly, rather than for any other reason. Besides, it's fowl.
 
#15
Cheap chicken is a source of protein for families on the breadline. For them to buy free range would mean losing breakfast for one person for a week.

I saw Hugh FWs series of three programmes, part of which was to get people from a housing estate to raise their own chickens. Although all of them hated the intensive farming process at least one carried on buying the cheaper products because that was all she could afford.
 

Fugly

ADC
DirtyBAT
#17
If you buy a whole, fresh chicken then the difference mainly comes with the method of dispatch, and how you then cook it - the best chickens are dispatched through immersion in hot oil (which also means they can be plucked in under 20 seconds) and are then packaged while the oil is still absorbed in the skin - it's pre-basted, in effect. You don't get birds like that in Asda though - you pay through the nose for them at quality butchers. Worth it, if your wallet stretches that far.

The normal supermarket birds (around a fiver for a 4-5 pound bird) you get what you pay for, add 30% for an "organic" one (meaning the farm owner is a vegetarian).

The majority of chicken however, isn't sold as a whole bird but parts thereof, and all the processed varieties - the former welfare issues of the donor are pretty irrelevant.
 
#18
Sven said:
Free range does taste better, organic better still.
Oh, you've followed them around since they were eggs? And I suppose you know which ones were Arbor Acres, Rosses, Petersons and Hubbards?

Unless you grow your own or you work in an abattoir, you probably just know them as "chicken."

It's like saying that when you drink wine, you only drink white because red is too acidic, ignoring the fact that some white wines taste just as bad.

They're all mass-produced and the likelihood is that the free-range or organic ones are more likely to pick up diseases due to lack of control. There's safety in numbers. A free-range farmer can hide one or two diseased chickens, but a battery farmer can't hide thousands.
 
#19
Carcass said:
filthyphil said:
As long as it tastes good, its' quality of life is of monumental indifference to me.
Point is, healthy free-range birds DO taste better...
Not always. I have seen a couple of tv shows where the taste test has backfired and the supermarket chicken/turkey has been voted best, much to the embarrassment of the chef.
 
#20
Sven said:
Cheap chicken is a source of protein for families on the breadline. For them to buy free range would mean losing breakfast for one person for a week.

I saw Hugh FWs series of three programmes, part of which was to get people from a housing estate to raise their own chickens. Although all of them hated the intensive farming process at least one carried on buying the cheaper products because that was all she could afford.

Baked beans are a source of cheap reliable protien for families on the bread line. so they could have beans on toast for breakfast and buy more expensive chicken!

Also cheaper products? sorry I didn't see this program Sven but are we talking about cheaper processed products or cheaper cuts of meat?

Because if its cheaper processed products, which is what a lot of people buy, then as far as I'm concerned they should get of their stupid arses and learn to cook properly. And if its cheaper cuts then they should learn to apportion food better, since apparantly roughly 1/3 of all food bought is thrown away untouched and in most cases still in its packet.

Less waste means amongst lots of other factors less spent on food.

And before you jump down my throat. I practice what I preach. I've stopped shopping at huge super markets and buy my veg from a grocer and meat from a butcher fruit comes from a would you believe it fruit shop. There are some things that I still nip into the local somerfield for but most of my food stock is bought locally and frequently. I use what I buy and chuck out very little. Once you get used to doing it, it is amazing how much you save on the shopping bill. Which gives you more money for other things, in my case Fags, and increased charitable donations to my local fox hunt!
 

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