Enlistment woes-Childhood asthma a barrier to joining up ?

Discussion in 'Army Reserve' started by Inigo_Montoya, Mar 12, 2008.

Welcome to the Army Rumour Service, ARRSE

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial military website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. I’m currently trying to enlist in a Local TA unit , its taken an absolute age, but got as far as the medical and was due to go off on a selection weekend, but my admission to having had asthma as a child has pretty much halted the process in its tracks.

    But it seems crazy, as I’m generally quite/very fit, regularly visit the gym and do some sports coaching. I haven’t had an asthma attack since I was a kid, nigh on 20 years ago.

    I’ve been informed that this could potentially mean that I won’t be able join up, as current posting to Iraq and Afghanistan mean they can’t run the risk of soldiers having an asthma attack.

    Needless to say I’m gutted!

    Anyone aware of similar situations occurring with potential recruits ?
     
  2. elovabloke

    elovabloke LE Moderator

    Edited as the txt disapeared but being said below.
     
  3. OldSnowy

    OldSnowy LE Moderator Book Reviewer

    I'm afraid that it is one of the few things that can indeed stop you dead. Others are, from my experience, any incidence of epilepsy or of heart murmurs.

    Unless you have been utterly free of symptons for a very long time, then you've had it. If you have been free of symptoms, it's probably down to the MO.

    Good luck!
     
  4. (1) They have been free from symptoms during the previous 4 years.
    (2) They have been free from bronchodilator treatment for 4 years and preventive
    treatment such as inhaled steroids or cromoglycate for 4 years.
    (3) Any earlier symptoms did not require long term or maintenance therapy with
    theophylline derivatives, nebulisers, oral or parenteral steroids, unless associated with a
    discrete episode of proven chest infection.
     
  5. Cheers guys.

    I've obtained my complete medical record and there's no record of Asthma since the late 80's.

    Clear on all your points Polar except;

    I went out on a month long trek to Nepal Khumbu and E.B.C in January 2006 - and as a precaution took two inhalers. But I never needed them and only took them in cse I suffered from Acute Mountain Sickness or Altitude sickness as the Salbutamol opens the lungs and increases the oxygen content of the blood to the brain. Even the prescription states this.

    In the event never used the narfing stuff and it's all still sealed in its box in my FAK and the sell by date is long passed.

    But am terrified that this is going to mean I'm binned.

    Hopefully Oldsnowy as you point out it'll be a common sense decision of the MO.
     
  6. A history of asthma should be no problem at all, as polar outlines the requirements. I was supposedly athmastic as a child, and that history was of no hinderance to my enlistment.
     
  7. The full text was

    Wheezing diatheses

    0312. Asthma is common, and whether persistent, recurrent, or seasonal in nature, with the exception of those special circumstances outlined below, it is considered incompatible with Service requirements and a bar to entry.

    a. Exceptions. Exceptions to the above bar may only be considered for those individuals with a history of asthma or wheeze who fulfil the following criteria:

    (1) They have been free from symptoms during the previous 4 years.

    (2) They have been free from bronchodilator treatment for 4 years and preventive treatment such as inhaled steroids or cromoglycate for 4 years.

    (3) Any earlier symptoms did not require long term or maintenance therapy with theophylline derivatives, nebulisers, oral or parenteral steroids, unless associated with a discrete episode of proven chest infection.

    b. Recruiting medical officers must take a careful history to detect childhood asthmatic disease including enquiry into such symptoms as wheezy bronchitis, recurrent cough, exercise and cold induced wheeze and previous use of bronchodilators and inhalers. In addition:

    (1) It may be necessary to obtain a report from the applicant's general practitioner to clarify the history.

    (2) In those cases where there is doubt, single Service requirements are:

    Royal Navy: Cases of doubt remaining after initial assessment must be referred with the RN questionnaire completed by the candidate's general practitioner.

    Army: Confirmation of the history by the candidate's GP. If accepted for medical examination, then a standardised exercise test will be conducted to a single-Service
     
  8. Indigo_M, check your PMs.
     
  9. It will be similar to the raf surely? if you want to be in the raf as a pilot you cannot of had hayfever within the past four years, thye simply check this by getting a note off of your doctor i believe and any cases you have had cannot be serious.
     
  10. Got the 'good news' today, that having reviewed my medical history the MO has not passed me fit to enlist.

    Not such a Good Friday after all.

    Thanks for the advice guys, especially HVM, I really apreciated the honesty of your PM which was very frank and summmed up the situation perfectly.

    I'll regret not being able to join up for a very very long time.

    But at least I tried.
     
  11. RP578

    RP578 LE Book Reviewer

    I_M,

    Truly sad to hear that you won't be able to enlist, but you at least tried and won't have to live with the nagging doubt of "what if?". On a separate not, I know it's not what you wanted, but there are other ways to serve your country. Have you thought about being a Special Constable or perhaps an Adult Instructor with the cadets?

    Good luck!
     
  12. I am applying for the Reserves and I have also just submitted my medical form and ticked the childhood asthma box as i have vague memories of being told i had asthma linked to hayfever ( I am now 34). However I have never used an inhaler or had an asthma attack or any other breathing difficulties whatsoever. I only ticked it as I assume it will be on my medical records. I am now worried after reading what happened to the OP. Is there anything I can do?