Enlisted to Commissioned

I've recently passed out of basic infantry training. And one of the future career options I've been considering later on down the line is becoming an officer.
A lot of these questions I'll be asking my superiors in Batallion as well, but any answers provided here would be greatly appreciated.

Would I have to change regiment if I commissioned?

What are the main pitfalls for potential officers?

What is the lifestyle actually like? (Are the rumors of deskwork outweighing the fieldcraft correct?)

What sort of fitness should I be aiming for and in what areas?
 
I've recently passed out of basic infantry training. And one of the future career options I've been considering later on down the line is becoming an officer.
A lot of these questions I'll be asking my superiors in Batallion as well, but any answers provided here would be greatly appreciated.

Would I have to change regiment if I commissioned?

What are the main pitfalls for potential officers?

What is the lifestyle actually like? (Are the rumors of deskwork outweighing the fieldcraft correct?)

What sort of fitness should I be aiming for and in what areas?
Assuming this not a wah, Officers move in and out of staff roles, which are essentially desk jobs.
Pitfalls for pot offrs - no idea, but someone will probably tell you if you not up to the mark.
Leadership can be lonely and should from the front!
 
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I've recently passed out of basic infantry training. And one of the future career options I've been considering later on down the line is becoming an officer.
A lot of these questions I'll be asking my superiors in Batallion as well, but any answers provided here would be greatly appreciated.

Would I have to change regiment if I commissioned?

You may choose to go elsewhere once you know your way around the army a bit. We used to take potential officers on, send them to Sandhurst with the promise of a job officering when they passed out. I would guesstimate that around half went off in other directions.

What are the main pitfalls for potential officers?

If you have decided you want to be an officer you need to perform from day one at your battalion. Remember two things:

1. You never get a second chance to make a first impression.
2. Reputation is everything.............................if a bloke is called to give his honest opinion of you and all he has ever experienced from you is stupid, juvenile, dangerous behaviour. Guess what he is going to tell people.

What is the lifestyle actually like? (Are the rumors of deskwork outweighing the fieldcraft correct?)

Officers are managers. The better you are at admin the quicker you will get out of the door to do the stuff in the field.

What sort of fitness should I be aiming for and in what areas?

Excel. Use it as an opportunity to be noticed in a positive light, join the Bn cross country team, or soccer team. My good friends sons both did biathlon and triathlon which helped their careers immensely.........plus the benefit of all the time away at competitions paid for by the army. Take up a martial art, it takes around three years to get a black belt in most.

Good luck.
 
You may choose to go elsewhere once you know your way around the army a bit. We used to take potential officers on, send them to Sandhurst with the promise of a job officering when they passed out. I would guesstimate that around half went off in other directions.



If you have decided you want to be an officer you need to perform from day one at your battalion. Remember two things:

1. You never get a second chance to make a first impression.
2. Reputation is everything.............................if a bloke is called to give his honest opinion of you and all he has ever experienced from you is stupid, juvenile, dangerous behaviour. Guess what he is going to tell people.



Officers are managers. The better you are at admin the quicker you will get out of the door to do the stuff in the field.



Excel. Use it as an opportunity to be noticed in a positive light, join the Bn cross country team, or soccer team. My good friends sons both did biathlon and triathlon which helped their careers immensely.........plus the benefit of all the time away at competitions paid for by the army. Take up a martial art, it takes around three years to get a black belt in most.

Good luck.
Thank you for the reply. I'll try and make the best of this advice
 
From very recent experience, seemingly competent, motivated and capable soldiers seemed to do badly at AOSB compared to others. I don’t know why this is. A chap in my syndicate was there for his 2nd attempt at AOSB and was great at everything but still didn’t get into RMAS. I’m not sure if standards are different or something was going on behind the scenes but I think soldiers have a harder time of it because they’re expected to be at a higher level than 20 year old civvies. Also if you’re in one of the Corps then you wouldn’t HAVE to change capbadge I don’t think, but if you’re in a smaller regiment you would almost certainly need to change. Another chap at AOSB was in the HCR and was told he’d have to go to the RDG or Lancers (if they would have him) if he wanted to remain in that role.
 
Would probably have to change regiments, given I'm going Royal Irish then.

This is just one of a quite a few directions I'm considering now I've passed out, but probably makes the most sense on a long term basis.

Again, thanks for the reply
 

RangdoOfArg

LE
Book Reviewer
Would probably have to change regiments, given I'm going Royal Irish then.

This is just one of a quite a few directions I'm considering now I've passed out, but probably makes the most sense on a long term basis.

Again, thanks for the reply
Considering your last, get to your battalion, find your feet, and take it from there. I admire your ambition, and wish you well.
 
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