English Channel hunt due for wreck of stolen Hercules

#81
I can second that, I knew a guy that slept with a Berlin whore that was related to Wolfgang that served a Brattie to a tankie that knew a stacker that had a sister that blew the postman that brought the bluey that was written by a REME that fixed the stolly that was stolen.
I heard it was the tankie who blew the postman, but the rest is kosher
 
#82
Hunters came home wit spent cartridges as they had a habit of being ingested before "Sabrinas" were fitted, Also helped with CofG. View attachment 341487
When I was a Space Cadet we went on camp to Chivenor. I spent my time in the Armoury helping load the magazines, service the Adens and loading to the Hunters.

I do remember them saying that when they ground tested the guns the cartridges discharges in a solid line of brass and that the links were stored on board as they were the problem with the engines.

Was 1970 though so I am willing to be corrected.
 
#83
#84
#85
When I was a Space Cadet we went on camp to Chivenor. I spent my time in the Armoury helping load the magazines, service the Adens and loading to the Hunters.

I do remember them saying that when they ground tested the guns the cartridges discharges in a solid line of brass and that the links were stored on board as they were the problem with the engines.
port_sabrina.jpg
port_sabrina.jpg


Was 1970 though so I am willing to be corrected.
Yep, You are right. Only links collected. Didn't know that. Ta.
 
#86
The RAF wouldn’t have shot down the C130E as they haven’t shot down anything since Suez!
Might’ve been RN?

Bloke down the pub called Sharkey said so!
 
#87
The RAF wouldn’t have shot down the C130E as they haven’t shot down anything since Suez!
Might’ve been RN?

Bloke down the pub called Sharkey said so!
Error, an F4 from Wildenrath shot down a Jaguar from Brüggen in 1982.
 
#90
Jeremy Vine covered this topic on radio 2 a couple of months back. One of the callers was, IIRC, at Chevnor and said that 'the Hunter returned with empty gun tanks'. I remember it because id never heard the term gun tanks before.
In fairness to the old boy, the 30mm rounds on the training versions meant for export had what was referred to as an ammunition tank - it was divided into two compartments - 150 rounds in each one, with one lot for the left hand weapon and the rest for the right hand one. The RAF and RN Hunters only had a single cannon, of course, but the term 'ammunition tank' was in contemporary use, at least in some circles.

Sharkey must’ve forgot that?
He was a bit busy elsewhere at the time, in fairness to him.
 
#91
Not that precise, I kid you not, slight thread drift story:- 1ADSR. about 1977-8, sprog officer orders a two vehicle radio det to a location taken from a map, Loc 123-456, det commander says" But sir, that's a boggy marsh, anything bigger that a skate board will sink!" Do it corporal! so he does. It took two tank recovery trucks, and a Chinook, with the boxhead forest miesters, and half a kilometre of sand tracks to get them out. The two wagons, plus genny trailers, had tried to navigate a floating road of logs and brush, only capable of supporting light vehicles........The officer was posted out.
We did get issued some beauties from the factory, didn't we.

However, all was not lost, we did get Bobbi Platt-Higgins :D
 
#92
He [Sharkey] was a bit busy elsewhere at the time, in fairness to him.
Are we talking about Chief Petty Officer Francis Ethelbert Sharkey?

If we are I can confirm that he was busy - very busy - elsewhere at the time. He was in fact, on a Voyage To The Bottom Of The Sea aboard S.S.R.N Seaview with Admiral Nelson and Captain Crane.
 
#93
Read this tonight, from the so-far excellent Lightning Boys...

RICK GROOMBRIDGE

Suddenly the operations phone rang. It was the duty controller. “Don’t ask any questions,” he said darkly. “Just do as you’re told.”
“Okay,” I said. “Right-oh.”
There was a pause. “An American exchange officer is about to visit you.” Another pause.
“Okay,” I said.
“You are to handover your duties to him then stand down to the officers’ mess.”
“Okay,” I said. “Is that it?”
“That’s it.” No reason, no explanation, no nothing apart from a click as he put down the phone.
An American exchange officer duly turned up, I handed over to him as briefed. He was just as tight-lipped as the controller so without further ado I retired to the officers’ mess to await developments. Soon, I heard a Lightning take off. It was a Saturday, there was no routine flying, so it must have been a QRA aircraft.
After less than an hour or so I heard the aircraft return and not too long after that the controller rang me in the mess. “You can resume your QRA duties now,” he said.
“Okay,” I said.
It was some time later when I heard on the BBC news a story about a USAF top-sergeant from the airbase at Mildenhall. This man’s Christmas leave had been cancelled. On the pretext of a taxi test on a C130 Hercules troop-carrier aircraft, which he was qualified to do, he had got airborne and headed for the States, which he was not qualified to do. The Hercules had crashed into the sea off the UK.
Everyone was totally zip-lipped, nonetheless rumours abounded. Word leaked out that the Lightning that had taken off shortly after I handed over QRA duty eventually returned to Wattisham with only one missile. After landing, the Lightning had taxied to the airfield missile site before returning to the QRA hangar with the normal two missiles. I wondered about this. I have wondered ever since. If the speculation was true, and if for no other good reason, at least it would have shown that, for once, one of the bloody missiles had actually worked.
 
#94
The RAF wouldn’t have shot down the C130E as they haven’t shot down anything since Suez!
Might’ve been RN?

Bloke down the pub called Sharkey said so!
< Wah shield up>

RAF pilots got kills in the Falklands. Flying RN airframes admittedly.
One of them was on an A4, using his cannons no less.

< Shield down....>


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Last edited:

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
#95
Read this tonight, from the so-far excellent Lightning Boys...

RICK GROOMBRIDGE

Suddenly the operations phone rang. It was the duty controller. “Don’t ask any questions,” he said darkly. “Just do as you’re told.”
“Okay,” I said. “Right-oh.”
There was a pause. “An American exchange officer is about to visit you.” Another pause.
“Okay,” I said.
“You are to handover your duties to him then stand down to the officers’ mess.”
“Okay,” I said. “Is that it?”
“That’s it.” No reason, no explanation, no nothing apart from a click as he put down the phone.
An American exchange officer duly turned up, I handed over to him as briefed. He was just as tight-lipped as the controller so without further ado I retired to the officers’ mess to await developments. Soon, I heard a Lightning take off. It was a Saturday, there was no routine flying, so it must have been a QRA aircraft.
After less than an hour or so I heard the aircraft return and not too long after that the controller rang me in the mess. “You can resume your QRA duties now,” he said.
“Okay,” I said.
It was some time later when I heard on the BBC news a story about a USAF top-sergeant from the airbase at Mildenhall. This man’s Christmas leave had been cancelled. On the pretext of a taxi test on a C130 Hercules troop-carrier aircraft, which he was qualified to do, he had got airborne and headed for the States, which he was not qualified to do. The Hercules had crashed into the sea off the UK.
Everyone was totally zip-lipped, nonetheless rumours abounded. Word leaked out that the Lightning that had taken off shortly after I handed over QRA duty eventually returned to Wattisham with only one missile. After landing, the Lightning had taxied to the airfield missile site before returning to the QRA hangar with the normal two missiles. I wondered about this. I have wondered ever since. If the speculation was true, and if for no other good reason, at least it would have shown that, for once, one of the bloody missiles had actually worked.

Not in the know about this kind of thing - why go through all the shenanigans as above, with US Exchange officer to replace apparently one person, to then include an RAF Fighter pilot and ground crew to reload a missile?
Have i missed something?
 
#96
further to that, did a Lightning with two missiles have the legs to do a QRA take-off, hammer it down to the channel, heroicly find and zap the C-130 and get back to Wattisham for tea and toast?

sounds like bollocks to me...
 
#97
further to that, did a Lightning with two missiles have the legs to do a QRA take-off, hammer it down to the channel, heroicly find and zap the C-130 and get back to Wattisham for tea and toast?

sounds like bollocks to me...
I don't know, Coke.
All I did was post a quote from the book.
The fact the RAF lad was prepared to put the dit into print does tell us something, doesn't it?
Also, the only time Lightning officially shot down another aircraft was when a harrier pilot ejected, yet the plane didn't fall out of the sky, and had to be shot down.
 
#98
further to that, did a Lightning with two missiles have the legs to do a QRA take-off, hammer it down to the channel, heroicly find and zap the C-130 and get back to Wattisham for tea and toast?

sounds like bollocks to me...
Chasing a Herc you wouldn't need to be supersonic for long and coming home you could stroll back even without AAR. They went a lot further North from Binbrook to meet Ivan in his Bear.
 
#99
In fairness to the old boy, the 30mm rounds on the training versions meant for export had what was referred to as an ammunition tank - it was divided into two compartments - 150 rounds in each one, with one lot for the left hand weapon and the rest for the right hand one. The RAF and RN Hunters only had a single cannon, of course,
The Hunter had four 30mm cannon in a removable tray surely? Or have I just been wah’d?
 
...The fact the RAF lad was prepared to put the dit into print does tell us something, doesn't it?..
to some extent, yes - its not the standard 'unamed sources', or 'someone who was there', but i just don't believe that if it was so critical that the aircraft had to be shot down, the RAF/USAF would then bugger about replacing an RAF air traffic controller with a USAF one - particularly in light of the well known 'Lightning starting to run out of fuel as soon as it took off' problem.

it also seems spectacularly illogical to take the RAF ATC'er out of the loop, but leave in the RAF pilot, and all the QRA ground crew, and the supply people who somehow have to account for the loss of a live, armed missile, the mess staff who wondered why the duty ATC'er was in the mess at 3am, the telephonist who put the phone calls through, and the radar people who presumably watched the C-130 mooch about in the channel, then vectored a pointy fast thing to it, with the C-130 then disappearing - and apparently none of these people ever thought it would make a nice ditty down the pub.

i wouldn't fall off my chair if it turned out that either the RAF or USAF had shot it down, but i'd be stunned if they'd done it in such a stupid way...
 

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