• ARRSE have partnered with Armadillo Merino to bring you an ARRSE exclusive, generous discount offer on their full price range.
    To keep you warm with the best of Merino gear, visit www.armadillomerino.co.uk and use the code: NEWARRSE40 at the checkout to get 40% off!
    This superb deal has been generously offered to us by Armadillo Merino and is valid until midnight on the the 28th of February.

Engine cover refurb - what to use?

#1
Winter is over and the bike has done okay on its daily 40 mile round trip. Only real problem is that my engine cases are pretty corroded, especially at the front and could do with a tidy up before the summer. It is a 2004 Hinckley Triumph by the way hence the poor quality original finish. I fancy doing the covers matt black. I've not done this before because I have always been worried about what to spray the covers with that will be heat resistant and hard enough so they do not scratch down to the aluminium every time I knock them with a spanner.

I am aware I need to get a stripper to remove the clear lacquer on the covers and then have to give them a polish. A couple of questions for anyone who has done this before:


What is the best stripper to use to remove what is left of the original clear lacquer?


What is the best thing to use to spray the covers matt black?


Do they then need resealing with a matt clear lacquer and if so what is the best one to use?

Thanks for any help.
 
#2
hi
I have just done the cat converter / collector box on my VFR exhaust with matt black heat resistant engine paint.
Probably not to the finish you would want for your Triumph, but there is plenty of stuff out there which will take the heat and knocks expected.
ride safe my friend
 
#5
Dont **** aout. If you have them off already, take them down to a local powdercoater. Most places that do powdercoat also do sand-blasting to prep the surface. There are a variety of "do-it-yourself" heat resistant sprays but I have yet to see one that looked good long term.
 
#6
Dont **** aout. If you have them off already, take them down to a local powdercoater. Most places that do powdercoat also do sand-blasting to prep the surface. There are a variety of "do-it-yourself" heat resistant sprays but I have yet to see one that looked good long term.
Snap. Most DIY heat resistant paint jumps off after a while. If you read some of the instructions it tells you to bake after application.............my Mrs was'nt too chuffed about the idea of BMW K100 engine components or exhaust in the oven.

Powder coat, or if you have a few bob get a cerakote type finish done. The more you spend the longer it will last.
 

Latest Threads