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Enforced retirement

Once we’ve sold up and moved, money won’t be an issue. I have become resigned to retiring completely. The idea of starting in a new industry at 60 holds no appeal.

Touring more of Scotland was always a plan (I’m a native and we have spent one of our holidays each year visiting family and touring).

I’m looking for a hobby or pastime that will stop me sitting in front of the telly all day or having arguments on Arrse.
I packed it in when i was almost 66, and like you can survive on savings and various pensions,now that i have time to do as i please, its my garden, DIY, and my weekly contributions to my local paper that keep me healthy and fit, mentally and physically. Our children, all now running their own households also require dad and his tools occasionally to fix, repair, install, and maintain their humble abodes, The community canal clean up and litter pick, is a nice way to mingle and give a bit back, and now with unlimited time, my books take pride of place. The national trust is an excellent way to educate yourself on times past and British history. Museums, gallery's, and local beauty spots are a pleasant way to spend a summers day, and as we are on the borders of Shropshire and staffordshire, the hills and valleys with their ancient towns and villages are always a nice day out.

Their is a plethora of amusements of sights sounds and events to visit, antique fairs, farmers meadows car boot sales, county fairs, military museums, every big town or city has one, and even your local park, and if it has a restaurant, so much the better.

...And then there is always this.......
Install a large shed, kit it out with:-

Shelving.
A sturdy work top, fitted with:-
A vice
pillar drill
bench grinder.
13a small plug in stick welder.
Strip lights. one over the work bench.
at least 3 two gang socket outlets.
A desk with draws.
Small TV
Small Fridge ( 6 cans of beer , minimum)
500w heater.
Comfy chair.

Hand tools many, power tools various
Many many jars of screws,( All sizes) nails, Rawlplugs, bolts, nuts, washers etc etc
A cow gown, brown ,as worn by Arkwright in "open all hours.

You are now ready to take on the world, there is nothing you cannot, fix, paint, repair, bodge, weld, cut, screw and finally destroy, you will be the envy of your mates, make the neighbours jealous, and be a total pain the the neck to the wife, enjoy,..... Oh, and have a copy of yellow pages handy for when it all goes tits up.
 
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Another thought, what about training in the aviation sector or elsewhere? Maybe not so much training delivery if you're going to be home-based, but you can definitely undertake contract work (gives you the ability to pick and choose) from home in the training needs analysis and training design areas.

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Install a large shed, kit it out with:-

Shelving.
A sturdy work top, fitted with:-
A vice
pillar drill
bench grinder.
13a small plug in stick welder.
Strip lights. one over the work bench.
at least 3 two gang socket outlets.
A desk with draws.
Small TV
Small Fridge ( 6 cans of beer , minimum)
500w heater.

hand tools various, power tools various
Many many jars of screws,( All sizes) nails, Rawlplugs, bolts, nuts, washers etc etc
A cow gown, brown ,as worn by Arkwright in "open all hours.
Spooky.
Exactly what I did 4 years back.
It's been a Godsend of late on a number of levels.
It's also an agreed ( by verbal contract) SWMBO free zone without an official pass.
My one is kitted with power 6 sockets, LED strips, and a proper HiFi so I can go Motown or ACDC and not bother anyone! Except maybe the local pigeons.


All kidding apart, us boys need some "territory" where no discussions or explanations are viable or required.
Saves a pile of "Silent Moments" or chasing up yer ARRRSE with a bloody dustpan & brush.:mad:
 
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Spooky.
Exactly what I did 4 years back.
It's been a Godsend of late on a number of levels.
It's also an agreed ( by verbal contract) SWMBO free zone without an official pass.
My bold. Absolutely, no question, carved in stone, its in the Geneva protocols.. My man cave, shed, workshop, sanctuary was constructed the second week we moved in, that was 32 years ago, and over the years has been expanded, modified, up-graded and today, the only people allowed in are the grand kids, she stays out of my world, and i don't interfere in hers..... women have kitchens....men have sheds.
 
My bold. Absolutely, no question, carved in stone, its in the Geneva protocols.. My man cave, shed, workshop, sanctuary was constructed the second week we moved in, that was 32 years ago, and over the years has been expanded, modified, up-graded and today, the only people allowed in are the grand kids, she stays out of my world, and i don't interfere in hers..... women have kitchens....men have sheds.
I'm afraid I get the kitchen too.:( She bakes like an angel in the old school Highland way (epically)....but cooks like a witch...ferkin' disaster.
 
+1 for buying a breed of dog that will keep you fit. Take up hill walking with it or as part of a greater group.

If you like touring Scotland as you mentioned, why not purchase a motor home to increase this experience. Take the dog with you as well, and maybe the wife :smile:
 

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Without taking the pish, one of the most rewarding, if poorly paid, jobs I've done was care assistant in a respite home.


I was just about to suggest something along these lines. After the mob and during my student years I worked as a support assistant first in elderly care and then with recovering junkies and alchies.

Substance misuse is where support workers seemed had the most varied backgrounds from retired economics lecturers to retired accountants, to biomedical scientists who fancied a change of pace. Worth considering as a way to earn beer money.

Not to mention by posting on ARRSE you’ve already come into contact with the average service user so would know what to expect.
 
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I’ve spent most of my working life flying helicopters. Army Air Corps then offshore in the North Sea, Police Air Support and finally Air Ambulance. There was a gap of about seven years working as a Journalist specialising in transport matters, apart from that flying has been my life.

Now, rapidly approaching 60, my flying career is over. The CAA has mandated that commercial helicopter pilots over 60 cannot fly solo. I often fly with a P2, but there is a stipulation in my contract that I must be able to fly solo (positioning flights, maintenance, etc).

Therefore I am forced to retire six years before I qualify for a state pension. I have my Army and employer’s pensions to provide a basic income, mortgage is paid off, no debts. The job market in the aviation industry is dire. Outside of aviation job prospects for over-60s with no transferable skills are non-existent.

The plan is to sell up in the South East and relocate to the Scottish Borders (Kelso or Melrose) buy a similar property to what we have and bank a six-figure sum to supplement the pensions. The plan was always to retire to the Borders, but not just yet.

Mrs CWW is in the Civil Service and can transfer to Edinburgh, but I am seeking advice on how I can spend my time, apart from spending more time on Arrse.

I therefore call on other retired Arrsers to let me know how I can fill my new-found leisure time and what others have done in similar enforced situations.

Edited for mong spelling.

Scottish Borders, ideal for walking/hiking as is Nothumbria, cheviot hills & The Lakes, not being a million miles away. Loads of trails/beaches to go at. Get a dog, a decent active one to get you out.

Again, where you are, fishing & hunting will be easy to get into.

Get a boat, you're not far from the coast.

Volunteer work at one of the numerous stately homes or estates in the area.

If you want to work, look at places like waitrose/john lewis they take on senior types, not flying, but keeps the grey matter going & involves interaction with humans, (well the jockanese, but you get the drift;)), if human contact is your thing.
 
It doesn't even have to be literature. Effective technical writing (particular in the aviation sector) is much in demand.

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There’s a massive demand for effective writing. Just about every business in the world needs stuff written. Anyone who vaguely knows their way around JSP101 is well set; refine from there by reading and research.

Business and technical writing doesn’t pay particularly well, but if it’s a hobby business that keeps you out of SWMBO that’s paying for an extra few days on holiday, who cares?

Just niche in writing a very specific product and market at the buyers in that sector.
 
I just found this on my Facebook, it just about sums up retirement

retired.jpg
 
Flying permanently with a P2 is not an option. Others have tried.

I am actually looking forward to not having to go to work anymore. I just need ideas on how to fill my time, but without too much of a commitment.

Suggestions from @dingerr and @Polyester sound on the right track.

Edited to credit the right people.
How about Technical Writing, or consultant, drone pilot, something freelance and part time.
 
Spooky.
Exactly what I did 4 years back.
It's been a Godsend of late on a number of levels.
It's also an agreed ( by verbal contract) SWMBO free zone without an official pass.
My one is kitted with power 6 sockets, LED strips, and a proper HiFi so I can go Motown or ACDC and not bother anyone! Except maybe the local pigeons.


All kidding apart, us boys need some "territory" where no discussions or explanations are viable or required.
Saves a pile of "Silent Moments" or chasing up yer ARRRSE with a bloody dustpan & brush.:mad:

I got into picture framing a few years ago. I did start a thread on here about it. Myself and my oldest son had some very good ideas (I thought) for doing something we’d enjoy and potentially making a few quid.

We brought various bit’s of equipment to do it properly and started training ourselves using various online resources to polish our skills to produce some very nice frames.

The problem was space. We’d set it up in a spare bedroom and there just wasn’t enough room to work properly.

We could do it but each stage meant setting up for that bit of work, taking it down and setting up for the next bit of work, take that down on so on. We found that were were spending half an hour to an hour making a frame depending on the complexity but two hours setting up the equipment for each stage and taking it down and setting up the next stuff.

You can break picture framing down into stages. Firstly, you cut the moulding to the required lengths usa mitre cutter. Then you glue and pin the moulding together to make the frame. That’s two stages using two different pieces of equipment. Then you need to cut a piece of mountboard to the right dimensions. Another stage with another piece of equipment. Then you mount the picture on the mountboard and then select and cut the glass you will be using. The glass bit is another piece of equipment. Then you can assemble the picture into the nice new frame taping the back up nice and neatly. Lastly screw some D rings on the back and cut some chain or cord to actually hang the thing up.

Framing entails a lot of precision work to make it a quality piece of work. The equipment you use helps you to achieve that. Hence ideally you need the whole thing set up so you can just flit around carrying out each stage.

An impossibility in a smallish bedroom. So we’re nearing completion of a purpose made workshop down the bottom of our garden. When it’s completed probably by the end of this coming week, we will have a room eight foot across and twenty five feet long initially. We’ll get everything set up in there on a permanent basis. We won’t have to set up and take down at each stage of making a picture.

We also have plans to enlarge the new workshop by a further eight feet by twelve feet meaning we can also do some other stuff as well.

I could have gone out and looked for premises to rent but that’s not cheap especially around West London. By doing it here at home, the cost is kept to a minimum and I can walk out of the back door and be at work thirty seconds later.

My son has got into programming. Some of the stuff he’s doing is quite remarkable and could gain us a nationwide customer base.

So my days of enforced idleness may be coming to an end. I’m really looking forward to it.
 
You have no comprehension of how near the truth that is, its frightening!
If people think that retirement is sitting on Park benches... The reality is that each of the last four years about this time I and two others shift about four tons of tilth, spread about another two tons, I'm the Youngest by the way. Winter is spent either tinkering with old Briggs motors to make them able to do the next years work, Plus there's the dog to walk twice a day, Bikes to fix ( Youngsters Pah) and if not that then it's another little patch on the railway to do. There's not enough hours in the day I tell ya. And then there's the writing...... Retirement-work was a sinecure. Well the best parts were, the worst parts were cancelled rest days, Christmases, Easters and wondering when I could anticipate a rest day not interrupted.
 

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