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Enforced retirement

ColdWarWorrier

Old-Salt
In some places in the country, there are voluntary teams who pick up and take the elderly and infirm to hospital appointments. Could you volunteer to do that?

You would be providing a valuable service. You could even tell them about your career while taking them, they would probably enjoy that.

I’m a pilot. That goes without saying!
 
dry stone dyking

Best course I ever spent 50 quid on.

If you fancy trying the 'rural' lifestyle, join the local Machinery Ring and contract out to local farms. I left the mob in 06, joined the local Ring in 07 after we were settled. First job was 1 weeks work replacing slats in a slatted shed, 13 years later I'm still at the same farm, self employed, a different job every day and more challenges than I can remember. I have learnt more skills than you could imagine and I'm almost fully conversant in the lingo...

JB
 

ColdWarWorrier

Old-Salt
Have a look at Charities - see if you can find one that resonates with you - maybe some 'bits & pieces' could fit sufficiently to interest you , enough to give it a go ?
 
Become a flight instructor on fixed wing and/or rotary or microlights or a simulator instructor or teach ground school or, if you have a degree, go lecturing at any college that teaches aviation related subjects.
 
I belong to a canal preservation group and we have a number of retired professional people amongst our midst - this includes pilots, sailors, teachers, doctors, dentists, solicitors, engineers and a railway signalman. Being a voluntary group we put in as much or as little time we want to. It get's us out in the fresh air, there's plenty of banter and we're doing something entirely different to that in our previous professional lives. We've just completed the restoration of two locks which involved the demolition and complete rebuild - most of us had never laid a brick in our lives before we started, now we feel like we're ready to take on a house extensions. Voluntary groups have so much to offer, and gives you a reason for getting out of bed.
 
I’ve spent most of my working life flying helicopters. Army Air Corps then offshore in the North Sea, Police Air Support and finally Air Ambulance. There was a gap of about seven years working as a Joirnalist specialising in transport matters, apart from that flying has been my life.

Now, rapidly approaching 60, my flying career is over. The CAA has mandated that commercial helicopter pilots over 60 cannot fly solo. I often fly with a P2, but there is a stipulation in my contract that I must be able to fly solo (positioning flights, maintenance, etc).

Therefore I am forced to retire six years before I qualify for a state pension. I have my Army and employer’s pensions to provide a basic income, mortgage is paid off, no debts. The job market in the aviation industry is dire. Outside of aviation job prospects for over-60s with no transferable skills are non-existent.

The plan is to sell up in the South East and relocate to the Scottish Borders (Kelso or Melrose) buy a similar property to what we have and bank a six-figure sum to supplement the pensions. The plan was always to retire to the Borders, but not just yet.

Mrs CWW is in the Civil Service and can transfer to Edinburgh, but I am seeking advice on how I can spend my time, apart from spending more time on Arrse.

I therefore call on other retired Arrsers to let me know how I can fill my new-found leisure time and what others have done in similar enforced situations.
Don't undersell yourself to your self. You've got a shed load of skills, it ain't just flying but it appears you view yourself as pilot full stop. Without taking the pish, one of the most rewarding, if poorly paid, jobs I've done was care assistant in a respite home. I knew I was going back to KSA and had a few months to kill before the course started. I was interested in nursing post KSA but events changed things.

Sit down and ask yourself whether you want to do something else or retire full stop. Once you've got that out of the way crack on. Less work all round, Borders not great and is going to get worse. So prolly better down sarf for a few years.
 
I belong to a canal preservation group and we have a number of retired professional people amongst our midst - this includes pilots, sailors, teachers, doctors, dentists, solicitors, engineers and a railway signalman. Being a voluntary group we put in as much or as little time we want to. It get's us out in the fresh air, there's plenty of banter and we're doing something entirely different to that in our previous professional lives. We've just completed the restoration of two locks which involved the demolition and complete rebuild - most of us had never laid a brick in our lives before we started, now we feel like we're ready to take on a house extensions. Voluntary groups have so much to offer, and gives you a reason for getting out of bed.

This is the kind of thing im quite envious about and wish i could do.
 
This is the kind of thing im quite envious about and wish i could do.

Our group isn't just about getting down and dirty in the canal although that's the main task. We have folks who do educational lectures and presentations on the history of the canals to other groups (e.g. WIs, Rotarians, U3A, etc) plus we need people to do publicity, PR, co-ordinate fund-raising, company secretary (the person currently filling that post drives a wheelchair), organise the tea and cakes, archivist and other admin tasks. No reason at all why someone in a similar situation to yourself couldn't be a productive and valued member of the team. We are no way unique, there's plenty more groups like ours with similar roles.
 
Blimey, where to start? Wine making, ale brewing, cooking, collecting, writing, etc. A cocker spaniel will fill your day, and if you're really desperate a border collie will sap the last drop of energy out of you.
 
How about writing?

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
What about moving into the drone piloting field. In remote areas in particular the use of drones can speed up medical assistance and ambulance services are looking at the idea.
 

Teeblerone

Old-Salt
What about moving into the drone piloting field. In remote areas in particular the use of drones can speed up medical assistance and ambulance services are looking at the idea.

that sounds like a cracking idea!

I used to enjoy taking watches apart [carboot sale or auction] & occasionally making them run again. Built a parts box, 'workstation'. Basic tools aren't that expensive, but get pricey quickly.
Even just changing a battery or mending/altering a strap is something.
 
There was a gap of about seven years working as a Journalist specialising in transport matters,

How about writing?
As suggested by Berlin 104. You have the experience after working for seven years. Write your auto biography first and self publish it on Kindle. If that goes well start writing fact based fiction based on your AAC and civil aviation experience based on a young hot shot aviation jockey called Cold War worrier.

Lots of ex squaddies seem to do it on Amazon Kindle. Couldn't you also contribute to Aviation and Transport Magazine as a freelancer. Or start your own blog on the internet.

I do some writing just to keep my mind active. Not for publication, just filling an exercise book with things that interest me. I find it very therapeutic.

The thing is you can do as much or as little as you want each day and any money you earn will be a bonus. Being up in the wilds of Jockland may enhance your creative skills and imagination.
 
I’m looking for a hobby or pastime that will stop me sitting in front of the telly all day or having arguments on Arrse.

If the Borders are a stick on.

Think about a plot of land and becoming self sufficient in things like chickens / eggs, vegetables, herbs and other fruity edibles that you can stick in the ground.

It very quickly grows on you ( SWIDT ) is healthy, saves you money and keeps you occupied, with an added small dose of achievement ( if you are a complete beginner like me )

It will keep you away from the telly, but I cannot say it will keep you away from arguments on ARRSE :) :)
 
The internet has opened up all sorts of possibilities to learn new stuff and earn good money. I mean really good money.

Mid 50s, I found myself in a similar situation; although retirement wasn’t enforced, it was getting increasingly difficult to get good roles and contracts. I was also getting burnt out; my lost service career was spent heading bid teams on big commercial contracts. We took 9 months out and travelled in 2016 to think about what to do next.

Since, we’ve built an eCommerce business in a sector I’d never worked in. I’ve had to learn loads of new skills; I’m always reading, listening to podcasts and presentations and trying new ideas. It’s immensely satisfying to be able to see my ideas help people.

eCommerce makes it possible to turn an interest, a hobby or a passion in to a viable business and to do it with little risk. The results can be life changing financially.
 

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