Energy Smart meters to be fitted in every home

Have a read of this bullsh*t ie

"As well as empowering them to make better, more informed decisions about their energy, smart meters will enable new services and opportunities to make our homes and energy networks more efficient and effective".
Means
They can charge you different tarrifs during peak times and cut you off
if need be,




Smart meters: What our expert panel has to say
Quite clearly the Daily Express worked tirelessly to find a panel of unbiased experts to comment on smart meters.

The best comment is this...

[if you have a smart meter] they will advise you about the dangers of storing combustible material next to your smart meter and electrical equipment
Presumably, if one doesn't have a smart meter, one's energy supplier will be unable to warn you of the dangers of storing combustible material next to your non smart meter and electrical equipment?
 
A few pages ago, someone mentioned oil tank dipping to gauge level.
My neighbour has a new bunded oil tank.It came with a Apollo oil sensor, some sort of "infra red" or "sonic" thingy? linked to a wifi display in the house.
Oddly the gauge is going up and down by one increment.Is it possible that the warm weather is heating the oil and expanding it and so giving a false reading?
 
A few pages ago, someone mentioned oil tank dipping to gauge level.
My neighbour has a new bunded oil tank.It came with a Apollo oil sensor, some sort of "infra red" or "sonic" thingy? linked to a wifi display in the house.
Oddly the gauge is going up and down by one increment.Is it possible that the warm weather is heating the oil and expanding it and so giving a false reading?
Quite possibly so,especially if its in direct sunlight, you canna change the laws of physics
 
Quite clearly the Daily Express worked tirelessly to find a panel of unbiased experts to comment on smart meters.

The best comment is this...



Presumably, if one doesn't have a smart meter, one's energy supplier will be unable to warn you of the dangers of storing combustible material next to your non smart meter and electrical equipment?
My thoughts exactly, after 'do I need someone to tell me this?' 'Should anyone with common sense be able to work it out?'
 
Quite clearly the Daily Express worked tirelessly to find a panel of unbiased experts to comment on smart meters.

The best comment is this...



Presumably, if one doesn't have a smart meter, one's energy supplier will be unable to warn you of the dangers of storing combustible material next to your non smart meter and electrical equipment?
I've had a few calls from the phone warriors about smart meters,[fun to be had]
I told one "if I use less lecky all they would do was put the standing charge up"
He said "you're right" and bid me good day
 
All going well then......

“Our report calls on the government to urgently review the progress of the roll-out and intervene to tackle its points of failure and risk.”

“BIG also calls on Ofgem, the industry regulator, to ensure that further programme costs are not passed on to customers, and that for a change programme savings are.”




British Infrastructure Group of Parliamentarians releases new report, ‘Not So Smart’. – The British Infrastructure Group
it's not BIG, it's not clever... :joker:
 
"Gas and electricity firms will be able to use smart meters to collect information about how customers use energy as frequently as every half hour.

This could reveal details such as which rooms and gadgets clients use most regularly, as well as when homeowners are in or out and even what time they are going to bed or how many cups of tea we make."

How? How can a meter which measures gas or electricity reveal what room or gadget the energy is used by?

"A family whose meter showed their home is losing a lot of heat compared to other neighbouring homes, might be a ripe target for insulation or a new boiler."

How can a meter which measures gas or electricy reveal the state of a house's insulation?


"By contrast someone who uses a lot of energy at peak prices could be identified as a profitable customer and offered extra perks to keep them on the company's books."

The energy companies already know who has big bills without smart meters.

Just another Daily Mail piece of unmitigated bollocks full of the usual yellow journalism. Full of 'might' and 'may' and unspecified experts.
 
My old one saves me a bundle and I intend to keep it.


Capture.PNG


Penny in, penny out.
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
I saw an interview on the news today where it was claimed that smart meters are the only way forward because they will be helpful to users. There was nothing about the fact that a smart meter could indicate when a building is vacant and ripe for burglary, or that there was a considerable amount of data which could be sold by the energy company in order to make more profit. It was also easily glossed over when questioned about the fact that energy companies would be able to used smart meters in order to charge the customer whatever rate they wished at any time of day.
What is even more fun is the fact that although customers are to be told that smart meters are going to be compatible not one energy company has stepped forward to claim their smart meter may still be used when suppliers are changed.
I believe very little of this is for the benefit of end users in a similar way to the water meters that are now required. It seems a little obvious that it is about profit for shareholders under the guise of "saving the environment". If such were true, governments and energy/water companies would be making serious efforts for alternative methods of supply.
 
i've just had a smart meter put in. they do have the ability to hit late-payers/non-payers with remote electricity cut-off, but other than that i couldn't see any harm...and it saves me having to walk upstairs, find a chair to stand on, and read the meter. when they ask for the quarterly reading. to be truthful that was the main reason i got one...

laziness isn't a crime :-D
 
I saw an interview on the news today where it was claimed that smart meters are the only way forward because they will be helpful to users. There was nothing about the fact that a smart meter could indicate when a building is vacant and ripe for burglary, or that there was a considerable amount of data which could be sold by the energy company in order to make more profit.
As can the fact that it's obvious that no-one is home simply by watching the house for an evening.

What sort of data do you think could be sold on? All the smart meter collects is data about energy usage. Who could make a profit out of knowing that you used 58 quid's worth of gas last month?

It was also easily glossed over when questioned about the fact that energy companies would be able to used smart meters in order to charge the customer whatever rate they wished at any time of day.
What is even more fun is the fact that although customers are to be told that smart meters are going to be compatible not one energy company has stepped forward to claim their smart meter may still be used when suppliers are changed.
That's because they're waiting for the installation of the SMETS2 system which will allow this to happen.

I believe very little of this is for the benefit of end users in a similar way to the water meters that are now required.
So you think that a single pensioner using small amounts of water ought to pay the same for it as a family of 6 who probably use 10 times as much?


There's so much tinfoil hattery around smart meters encouraged by rags like the DM with its doom and gloom.

A smart meter is an ordinary meter with a sim card and an encrypted network.
 
Last edited:

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
As can the fact that it's obvious that no-one is home simply by watching the house for an evening.

What sort of data do you think could be sold on? All the smart meter collects is data about energy usage. Who could make a profit out of knowing that you used 58 quid's worth of gas last month?



That's because they're waiting for the installation of the SMETS2 system which will allow this to happen.



So you think that a single pensioner using small amounts of water ought to pay the some for it as a family of 6 who probably use 10 times as much?


There's so much tinfoil hattery around smart meters encouraged by rags like the DM with its doom and gloom.

A smart meter is an ordinary meter with a sim card and an encrypted network.
You seem to have a bit of an idea about all this stuff, endure. I foolishly applied to have a smart meter fitted some time last year, but when the engineer showed up, he took one look at the set-up in the cupboard (it's a terraced house divided up into three separate flats) and said he couldn't fit it because all the meters have a common earth. How does that influence fitting a smart meter? Any idea?

Also, some wallah from the utility company showed up a month or so ago to check both our gas and leccy meters (apparently it has to be done once a year). He told me that, in principle, smart meters could be re-programmed to pick up conversations. Is that true, or was he just pulling me plonker?

MsG
 
As can the fact that it's obvious that no-one is home simply by watching the house for an evening.

What sort of data do you think could be sold on? All the smart meter collects is data about energy usage. Who could make a profit out of knowing that you used 58 quid's worth of gas last month?



That's because they're waiting for the installation of the SMETS2 system which will allow this to happen.



So you think that a single pensioner using small amounts of water ought to pay the some for it as a family of 6 who probably use 10 times as much?


There's so much tinfoil hattery around smart meters encouraged by rags like the DM with its doom and gloom.

A smart meter is an ordinary meter with a sim card and an encrypted network.

A little of a report by MPs


Smart meters are expected to cut energy bills by just £11-a-year, much less than originally hoped.
Half of energy readers also stop working when customers switch energy suppliers and a tenth go ‘dumb’ due to poor signal, MPs and peers said yesterday.
A cross-party committee warned the £11billion project to install the meters in every home by 2020 should be urgently reviewed.
They said consumers are ‘picking up the tab’ for the ‘over time, over budget and mismanaged sThe average annual saving on a duel fuel bill by 2020 was estimated in 2014 to be £26, but this has now been reduced to just £11.
The report by the British Infrastructure Group (BIG) of MPs and Lords warned many smart meters have stopped working because of bad mobile phone signal or after switching supplier. cheme’.
Currently the smart meter roll-out is going to be delivered over time, over budget and with consumers quite literally picking up the tab for supplier mismanagement.’ The report found more than half of the one million customers with a smart meter who annually switch provider are left with a gadget which has lost its smart features.
The meters are reliant on existing mobile networks to send data accordingly so do not work in areas with poor signals

The meters are reliant on existing mobile networks to send data accordingly so do not work in areas with poor signals

This includes automatically sending data to suppliers and displaying energy use in pounds and pence. And as many as a tenth of meters are not fully functioning because of bad mobile phone signal, the group found.

The meters are reliant on existing mobile networks to send data accordingly so do not work in areas with poor signals.

The report also warned about suppliers also using ‘scare tactics’ in order to meet the target of getting meters installed in all homes by 2020.

They highlighted tactics including stating that ‘bills would otherwise go up, smart meters are compulsory, current meters are unsafe, and booking installations without a customer’s consent’.

The report said: ‘The roll-out of 53million energy smart meters, far from being a programme which would provide benefits to all, has been one which continues to raise significant concerns.

‘Customers have firstly been left paying over £11billion for outdated and obsolete smart meters, up to 10 per cent of which have gone “dumb”, and which have actually made switching harder.’
 
Listening to the BBC, cynical customers might have had good reason. "Some users have experienced problems with installations, inaccurate bills or loss of the meter's 'smart' features when they switch suppliers". The BBC also indicates the IT system is erm, delayed? Bit of a dog's breakfast but of course Smart Energy GB and the Energy Dept have every confidence ;) 8 out of 10 Cats...

AIUI from reading up on Ofgem, smart meters can be chinned off so we've decided to ignore the pushy letters from the installers and EDF, and told them in writing that we don't want one yet. Some tariffs will be cheaper but without a smart meter we might not have access to them, ho hum. If I don’t want a smart meter now, I can get an installation on their costs later on. We'll see how it pans out. Yawn....

Watchdog to review UK smart meter rollout
 
You seem to have a bit of an idea about all this stuff, endure. I foolishly applied to have a smart meter fitted some time last year, but when the engineer showed up, he took one look at the set-up in the cupboard (it's a terraced house divided up into three separate flats) and said he couldn't fit it because all the meters have a common earth. How does that influence fitting a smart meter? Any idea?

Also, some wallah from the utility company showed up a month or so ago to check both our gas and leccy meters (apparently it has to be done once a year). He told me that, in principle, smart meters could be re-programmed to pick up conversations. Is that true, or was he just pulling me plonker?

MsG

Sorry I'm not familiar with the internal gubbins so can't say. Even if there was a microphone fitted to every meter which seems to me vanishingly likely, they'd only be able to hear you while you're near the meter. It my case that would mean going into the cellar to hold all my important conversations.

GCHQ have been involved in helping design the security of the network that the meters use.

Which do you think is more of a threat? A meter that sits in the cellar and sends a little radio signal every hour or letting a total stranger into your house to read it?

Subscribe to read | Financial Times
 
I think the possibility of variable pricing is quite clever, as it could encourage people to make greener choices

For example, if it was particularly windy &/or sunny there will be a lot of renewable power being produced, so they could reduce the price of electricity in order to encourage people to use energy hungry appliances like Tumble dryers at these times.
 
[
A little of a report by MPs
Smart meters are expected to cut energy bills by just £11-a-year, much less than originally hoped.
Half of energy readers also stop working when customers switch energy suppliers and a tenth go ‘dumb’ due to poor signal, MPs and peers said yesterday.
That depends on whether you take any notice of the display of energy used when it's fitted. I bought an electricity measuring meter thingy a while ago and watching what happened to consumption when I turned things on and off helped me cut my leccy bills by at least 10%. A smart meter would allow you to do the same with leccy and gas if you were willing to pay a little attention to it.

It also means that you don't have to read your meter every month/let a stranger into the house to do it for you.

The changing supplier thing will be sorted when SMETS2 comes on line.
 

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