Enemy Coast Ahead - Guy Gibson VC

#61
Yes, Brickhill’s book was The Dambusters. Some of it is now known to be a bit inaccurate (Brickhill didn’t have access to the F540s), but it is still a great introduction to the subject.
As Bader has also mentioned on this thread, Paul Brickhill was the author of his biography 'Reach for the Sky'.
 
#62
Doubt it. Bet you've never had any in your dull boring land, either.

Winker.
Your second response to an open question. A little less temperate than your previous, but neither would seem to qualify as an answer.

Curious that you wish to hurl vitriol about.

Have a nice day, or several more drinks.
 
#63
There’s a pub in Cambridge who’s name escapes me. Quite a tall ceiling in the bar and still heavily stained with nicotine and smoke.

Why has the landlord not given it a lick of paint to freshen it up you may ask?

The simple answer is that when you look closely at the ceiling it is covered in graffiti from bomber crew who used to drink there. 70 year old graffiti lovingly left alone to remember the memories of those brave men.

ISTR that there is a picture of then Memphis bell behind the bar and I think that crew signed the ceiling.
That would be "The Eagle" in the city centre, a very atmospheric and extremely popular establishment.
 
#65
Guy Gibson's nephew worked at the last fire station I served at, still in the job I believe. He was a nice bloke.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#66
Your second response to an open question. A little less temperate than your previous, but neither would seem to qualify as an answer.

Curious that you wish to hurl vitriol about.

Have a nice day, or several more drinks.
Dont worry about him whiffler Plane spotters tend to be an odd breed
 
#67
I grew up in Maidstone in Kent. As a schoolboy, my nextdoor neighbour was a Solicitor. He told me that he had been at school for six years with Guy Gibson and thought that he was "absolutely hateful". I suppose that that characteristic would be an essential for the VC.
Johnny Johnson doesn’t paint Gibson in a very good light in his autobiography. He treated anyone beneath his rank with utter contempt & was nothing like he was portrayed in the film, so Johnson said.
 

AfghanAndy

On ROPS
On ROPs
#68
Johnny Johnson doesn’t paint Gibson in a very good light in his autobiography. He treated anyone beneath his rank with utter contempt & was nothing like he was portrayed in the film, so Johnson said.
Kenneth More was a lovely chap. But he could only portray that one character type.
 
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#69
There are lots of tales from Nottingham about Gibson. A bit of a ladies man and went to Nottingham to de-stress. That is to get away from the base, get pissed and shag someone. Can't fault him for that one.

His regular pub was the Black Boy. Yes really. Now demolished. He had a regular girlfriend in that pub.
TMy old stomping ground, used to knock a Dutch bird off from The Park/near the Castle in the 1970s. Lincoln /the A46/Fosse isn't far. The Hotel you refer to was on Long Row and was frequented by celebrities. Quite the place to be seen and it funded a few good local causes. There's now a Primark in its place and its four old stone lions were/are in the grounds of Nottingham Castle. Incidentally: Albert Ball VC, was born and raised in Nottingham.

The area is steeped in Bomber history; G.G. was at Coningsby and Syerston, I know them well and worked at Coningsby. Also at Digby (BoB fighters IIRC).

Harris described Gibson as "As great a warrior as this island ever produced".

Inside Gibson’s office at Scampton

Bonus ball: Watch Wing Commander G.P Gibson VC, DSO, DFC inspects the Headquarters at Trent Lane - BFI Player
 
#70
Michael Caine on one of the chat shows related to his time filming BoB. He was waiting on set when he saw a Jaguar appear and drive into his Mercedes, out of the Jaguar learched Bader ranting about "Who parked this Kraut shit here".

The old adage about having the right man in the right place at the right time seems to be invariably balanced by them being the wrong man in the wrong place all the rest of the time.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#72
The decision to form a strong Bomber Command was a strategic initiative taken at War Cabinet level. It was thought that the UK/British Empire could not defeat Hitler's Germany until it had been substantially weakened. And the way to weaken it was to destroy its industrial potential.

The theory was sound enough. The RAF (and the USAAF) spent the bulk of the war (a) gaining air superiority, (b) developing the correct tactics and techniques and (c) identifying the correct targets to hit. When those three problems were solved in late 1944, the German war economy collapsed rapidly.

Bomber Command took heavy losses - they were allowed to continue to do so because WSC/the War Cabinet thought that the impact on the German war economy justified incurring those losses.

Wordsmith
 
#73
My grandmother proudly spoke of her cousin "Knighty" who was in the Dam Busters...

I assumed it was shite as Les Knight was Australia...

However an afternoon on the internet some years back & I'm 99% sure I've found the correct Knight buried in the Reichswald Forest Cemetery shot down returning from marking a synthetic oil factory,

Not 617, but "pathfinder" & home village ect match up.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#74
Kenneth More played Bader . Richard Todd played Gibson. Todd could ( IMHO ) play harder types than More but as in so many war films was rather old for the role.
More was older than Todd. As for harder types- I would argue that his role in 'The Mercenaries' was harder than anything I've ever seen Todd in.

Not looking for a fight, I enjoy watching both. If I ever win the lottery there'll be an outdoor cinema in Tower Hamlets showing 'The Northwest Frontier' from dawn 'til dusk - with 'It Ain't Half Hot Mum' playing to keep the plebs happy while we change the reels.
 
#75
The decision to form a strong Bomber Command was a strategic initiative taken at War Cabinet level. It was thought that the UK/British Empire could not defeat Hitler's Germany until it had been substantially weakened. And the way to weaken it was to destroy its industrial potential.

The theory was sound enough. The RAF (and the USAAF) spent the bulk of the war (a) gaining air superiority, (b) developing the correct tactics and techniques and (c) identifying the correct targets to hit. When those three problems were solved in late 1944, the German war economy collapsed rapidly.

Bomber Command took heavy losses - they were allowed to continue to do so because WSC/the War Cabinet thought that the impact on the German war economy justified incurring those losses.

Wordsmith
It has been argued by some that if Harris had not switched his main effort from the Ruhr to Berlin in late 1943 the collapse of ( or at least severe damage to ) the German war economy might have come sooner. As it was the amount of resources the Germans were forced to divert to home defence ( guns, aircraft , personnel etc ) may have made the strategic air offensive worth it anyway .
 
#76
. To my eternal shame, I never gave him the respectful listening he deserved. I never met him again. I regret that.

A modest hero.
Similar story - a childhood friend of mine's father had been a Wellington pilot during the war. The only story I can recall him telling was filling bullet holes in the canopy with chewing gum.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#77
It has been argued by some that if Harris had not switched his main effort from the Ruhr to Berlin in late 1943 the collapse of ( or at least severe damage to ) the German war economy might have come sooner. As it was the amount of resources the Germans were forced to divert to home defence ( guns, aircraft , personnel etc ) may have made the strategic air offensive worth it anyway .
Harris - to give him credit - had many qualities as a commander - he was a formidable tactician, administrator, advocate for his cause, and so on. However, he lacked strategic insight.

Smashing Berlin - as was done to Hamburg - would probably have won the war, However, to achieve that was beyond Bomber Command's capabilities at the time. A wiser commander would have realised that and gone after more strategically attainable goals.

The weaknesses in the German war economy had been identified with some accuracy before the war - oil and their Reichsbahn (rail network). Had Harris focused on how to improve navigational and bombing accuracy so they could have been hit hard earlier in the war, he would have caused the German industrial collapse to happen months (or years) earlier than it actually did.

But 20/20 hindsight is a wonderful thing. We should also remember that strategic bombing was a strategy that had to be learned on the job in WW2. And that the RAF was continually seeking to improve its strategy and tactics throughout the war. Without prior experience to draw on, they actually got a lot right - and should be given credit for that.

Wordsmith
 
#78
More was older than Todd. As for harder types- I would argue that his role in 'The Mercenaries' was harder than anything I've ever seen Todd in.

Not looking for a fight, I enjoy watching both. If I ever win the lottery there'll be an outdoor cinema in Tower Hamlets showing 'The Northwest Frontier' from dawn 'til dusk - with 'It Ain't Half Hot Mum' playing to keep the plebs happy while we change the reels.
Yes I meant specifically Todd playing Gibson was a bit old. Good point about More's part in The Mercenaries/Dark Of The Sun.
 
#79
Michael Caine on one of the chat shows related to his time filming BoB. He was waiting on set when he saw a Jaguar appear and drive into his Mercedes, out of the Jaguar learched Bader ranting about "Who parked this Kraut shit here".

The old adage about having the right man in the right place at the right time seems to be invariably balanced by them being the wrong man in the wrong place all the rest of the time.
It may be apocryphal, but I have read that at the time of the filming of ‘Battle of Britain’, Michael Caine could not drive. The scene of him driving off from the bombed airfield in his red vintage car (Rolls?) with his black lab was shot in such a way as to hide the fact it was being pulled by a rope and members of the film crew out of shot.

Maybe his Merc was chauffeur driven?
 

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
#80
Kenneth More played Bader . Richard Todd played Gibson. Todd could ( IMHO ) play harder types than More but as in so many war films was rather old for the role.
Richard Todd was in Normandy at Pegasus Bridge, relieved by Lord Lovat. Kenneth Moore was a Lieutenant in the RN.
 

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