End of the line for model trains?

Tricky one as you'll need to dismantle the axle to get a worm gear on. Probably easier to replace the tender wheels with some non-traction tyred ones and add some weight to the tender.

I use lead flashing left over from an old roofing job for my models.
Weight in the tender isn't the issue. There's plenty in it and I have a drive that I can fit on the centre axle but it would also require an enlarged slot in the base cover to accommodate it. So the motor issue remains relatively easy. The problem is the tender and its associated tender drive because a new axle base would be needed and , here's the punch line, the streamline tenders on the those models will not fit a standard base. They are too long for the standard Stanier tender. Nor will I require much weight in the tender, it'll need to be in the loco to get the adhesion right. But If I manage to get another one [loco that is] I might have a play around. They're not worth that much and unboxed. , As it is I have the nearest to a prototypically correct Hornby product so I don't fancy the butchery on these.

As it is with the 2P and the 3F that I have which are body drive, yes they slip, I like that. Since I'm not on DCC or all that I can have fun double heading over the viaduct.
 
It's almost certainly a Bassett-Lowke dating from the 1930s


Shame it's not mint boxed....
Guess what. I've just stumbled across Ninth edition model railway handbook by Bassett Lowke ninth edition.
 
I repair my sets occasionally, if they need it, but I mainly build accessories, like e.g. a modem to connect the set to a PC for digi modes (RTTY, PSK etc.) or a remote controlled antenna tuner for HF. I also build my own antennas and masts (knowing how to weld helps).
My amateur sets are mostly from the 1970s, with a technology I still can understand and repair, or ex military or government sets (e.g. a Clansman PRC-320, an East German commercial HF transmitter the size of two refrigerators etc.).
I play the five string banjo, mouth harp and the guitar and I'm trying to teach myself how to play the fiddle.
And I like to make things out of metal, especially blacksmithing.

With the last I also try to make a bit of money, as we have a tourist attraction here in the village, and often when I have my forge going, there are tourists coming and asking if they could watch me forging something. I plan to make stuff like fireplace set (coal shovels, pokers etc.) or old style candle holders for them. I also got a bunch of old car springs from a neighbour, which I want to make knives from. What also sells well are handmade nails as souvenirs, especially when the tourists see them being made. I also had an order from a guy who was restoring a century old farmhouse and needed some large handmade nails for some visible structure.
As Walther observes, I too am a Radio Ham ( licensed in the 70's), and still have my FT101ZD3 and FL2100Z(floozy) Linear.......Other interests have been/are Model Railways and Playing ( left-hand) guitar...All very expensive nowadays, and The apartment I have ( size wise ), precludes a model railway---although I still have loads of track, loco's and rolling stock....As for Ham Radio We have very restrictive covenants on the apartments which means I cannot erect an outside aerial.........However I have my guitar collection to thrash about on, so life is not that bad ( albeit expensive ).....Best Wishes. H6UKVET.
 
As mentioned earlier "Steve" ain't me!!
I just publish his work for the interest of those watching this thread ;) .

Published by: Steve, on 22 April 2020.

That is Steve of . . . . . Steve's 009 and 09 Adventure

Maintenance Man


Introducing the factory’s maintenance man.
He’s another S&D Models figure. I rather like him and I feel I should give him a name.
Perhaps I’ll call him Joe Works . . .
1587640067891.png

 
As mentioned earlier "Steve" ain't me!!
I just publish his work for the interest of those watching this thread ;) .

Published by: Steve, on 22 April 2020.

That is Steve of . . . . . Steve's 009 and 09 Adventure

Maintenance Man


Introducing the factory’s maintenance man.
He’s another S&D Models figure. I rather like him and I feel I should give him a name.
Perhaps I’ll call him Joe Works . . .
View attachment 468032
It's the 21st century, surely his name should be Joe's Wokes?
 
Now for those of you interested I've done some research in to LMR tenders. Believe it or not there is a paucity of information around to whit my post 941 above.
It seems that there is an fixation with what types of tender looked like, so here are my own findings.
For LMR at any rate here goes.

The fundamental LMR tender is the Fowler type, that is to say a box on three sets of wheels with the axle spacings broadly similar. When Stanier took over that's all he had. But needless to say with Larger Locomotives came the need for larger tenders.

When I got my First Princess, I wanted to go back to the concept of what it looked like when it was first outshopped. The First 6200, was outshopped with a standard Fowler tender which incidentally was the same for the early Jube's 5XP etc.
However what Stanier did next was to build the tender higher which was GW practice and this is called the high sided fowler type. This was to accommodate 4000 Gals of water as opposed to 3500 Gals. and provide for a bit more coal. The standard LMR shape derived from this rather than staying more Collett GW. Its seems that the curvature of the tops of the tenders had far more to do with the streamlining concept than anything else as the curvature tends to copy that of the cab roof. However the lower Fowler tender looked a bit out of place on the larger locos and as such the next loco 6201 came out with the more familiar Stanier type tender. This has remained the norm as it conveniently houses the old Hornby ringfield motor. (This leads me onto the part that I hate, namely traction issues.) That then became the principle for the BR standard classes for the larger locos conveniently called BR 1 A/B/C/D/E etc.
But there are also variations on a theme.
Stanier A tenders fitted to the coronations had steam coal pusher. Stanier B tenders for the non streamlined locos had no fairings like the A's. The other factor was that if in Workshops, the tender was Separated from the loco for major maintenance, it might not be re mated with the same loco.

Certainly for parts of the exchanges in 1948 tender and their capacities were very important because not all routes had water troughs and it's noted that one Duchess was fitted with a WD style tender- that's the slab sided one fitted to 8F WD locos.
Wikki has an excellent section on the duchesses- not least because there is a wealth of tender information not common elsewhere.
Other sources Stanier and Gresley. That's a YRM publication, LMS turbine Locomotive 6202 by RS carter. Very good line drawing, but unfortunately no dimensions and Royal Scot super profile, Haynes Profile 1985. Unfortunately my Printer scanner is a bit problematic. I planning to post some pics but no dice.
 

Dr Death

War Hero
As mentioned earlier "Steve" ain't me!!
I just publish his work for the interest of those watching this thread ;) .

Published by: Steve, on 22 April 2020.

That is Steve of . . . . . Steve's 009 and 09 Adventure

Maintenance Man


Introducing the factory’s maintenance man.
He’s another S&D Models figure. I rather like him and I feel I should give him a name.
Perhaps I’ll call him Joe Works . . .
View attachment 468032
His Boss the Foreman
1587811772803.png

Looks an evil sod!
 
Again sorry for no, pics but HC Casserly's book steam locomotives of British Railways, ie the Railways of Britian has a very useful photo section in for all four regions and oddities. Therein is the odd shot of one of the LMS compounds 4-4-0 which was originally built under the Johnson/Deeley/ Fowler auspices no 936 or BR 40936. It shows the oddity of having a Fowler/Stanier High sided tender attached which it retained until is was passed to sister engine no 933. It was the only engine at the time in that class to have one. I'll er...drone now......
 
It's me again. I've just treated myself to a virtually new Triang Coronation class in Maroon which is Body drive and it really proves my point about the tender drive issue. You can make it slip with ease. Now the other two are in blue and tender drive, the valve gears are better, but I'm well chuffed.
 
As mentioned earlier "Steve" ain't me!!
I just publish his work for the interest of those watching this thread
;) .

Published by: Steve, on 23 May, 2020 .

That is Steve of . . . . . Steve's 009 and 09 Adventure.

Layout Completed? Yeah!

1590329060142.png


 
[DRIFT]

As mentioned earlier "Steve" ain't me!!
I just publish his work for the interest of those watching this thread
;) .

Steve's 009 and 09 Adventure

Models of narrow gauge railways in O9 and 009, visits to exhibitions and real railways


Published by Steve, on 27 May 2020.
Adopt an Engine

As I write all preserved railways in the UK are closed and they are unable to earn much needed cash.

I’m keen to support preserved railways in these difficult times so I was very pleased to find the Kirklees Light Railway Adopt a Engine scheme . . .

I thought the ‘Gold Package’ was really good value and I am now the proud owner of a ticket to ride all day for 4 adults, a photo of Owl, a pen, a very detailed pin badge, a certificate and a KLR teddy bear.

1590664803743.png



[/DRIFT]
 
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Early Fathers day present off the wife,
an unusual item of rolling stock.
The 45T independent snowplough in Network Rail livery from Flangeway models.
Built in the early 1960's from redundant steam locomotive tenders.
NR have a fleet of twenty that are kept at various locations around the country including two I regularly see in a siding at Norwich station.
They've all recently been refurbished to give another fifteen years service.
According to the National Railway Museum blog, there was some head scratching as to why NR were asking if the NRM still had blueprints for the Nigel Gresley designed tender.
 

Attachments

I was extremely lucky on Friday and picked up an A4. Difference? Well it’s an old Dublo two rail version as part of a Red Dragon set . Now I used to have Dublo as a kid, well that is me dad did (arf). It runs really smoothly. Well happy with that For £60. Box was also slightly damaged but given it is over half a century old....

For the record the price was still written on the box £ 5.19.6.

Also interestingly the track pack that came with it originally has the same profile as
PECO Track, which begs the question as to why triang used coarser track and flanges. The old set I used to have was three rail So never had experience of two rail until the late 70’s.

So I’m on a bit of a mission now. Reason. I also have old brochures. The other maker Apart from Maerklin of course was Trix Twin.
If on the other hand you have a Wrenn collection, the only steam loco they made was an unrebuilt Scot.
Well impressed with some of the modelling standards here, so well done all.
 
As mentioned earlier "Steve" ain't me!!
I just publish his work for the interest of those watching this thread
;) .

Published by: Steve, on 05 JULY 2020.

That is Steve of . . . . . Steve's 009 and 09 Adventure

Virtual Exhibitions – Good and Different

This weekend I attended my first virtual exhibition, the World of Railways Virtual Exhibition 2020.

It was really good. Different from a traditional exhibition, but definitely good.

It was online so I didn’t have to travel anywhere, there were no crowds, no rucksacks and I could dip into the exhibition whenever it suited me. There were lots of great layouts, practical tutorials and interviews with people I wouldn’t normally get to meet.

Highlights for me were . . . [click] . .

 
'
@Provost , I think you've written a reply but it isn't showing for some reason. Yes it is an A4 :cool: . Point is it was too good to miss and a bit of Nostalgia. last time I had one of these was 1959 in3 rail
 

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