End of the line for model trains?

May I post a question?
I have a diagram 1/211 Palvan awaiting conversion (to the chassis, mainly) to go into WD markings, as running in the 1960s. What colour should I paint it? The photograph I have (in one of David Larkin's books) is B&W, but looks dark enough to be Deep Bronze Green. What say you, good people?
 
Currently sitting in my comfy chair, with a G&T made to decent specs, watching my Standard 4MT do very slow circuits so that each time it comes past I can flick my eyes from Star Trek discovery and watch the valve gear. Here's the grown up version

Happy days on NYMR. I managed to get on the footplate of the S or N15 ( can't remember which as they're similar) But I do like 4MT's, funny thing is their forebears the Fowler/ Fairbarn's were nearly never built after the River class accident on the southern ( See red for Danger by Rolt). Happened somewhere down Tonbridge or some such. Cause was sway of the water in the tanks on a section of track. They were tested elsewhere and found to be stable but the southern converted them all to tender Locos
"The U class was designed in the mid-1920s for production at a time when more obsolete 4-4-0 locomotives were withdrawn, and derived from Maunsell’s earlier SECR K (“River”) class 2-6-4 tank locomotives"
 
May I post a question?
I have a diagram 1/211 Palvan awaiting conversion (to the chassis, mainly) to go into WD markings, as running in the 1960s. What colour should I paint it? The photograph I have (in one of David Larkin's books) is B&W, but looks dark enough to be Deep Bronze Green. What say you, good people?
As a ex Military Railwayman, for reference ask to join the 'ARMY RAILWAY HERITAGE FACEBOOK PAGE', lots of knowledgeable info on there and there may even be a colour copy of the locomotive available from one of the members.

Deep Bronze Gloss Green was used on the locomotive at 79 Railway Squadron in the mid 70's to early 80's, (I know as I painted loads of them) then the colour of the new locomotives from the mid 80's were supplied in NATO Matt IR Green.

Dark Brunswick Green in gloss was applied to the ambulance coaching stock.

Locomotives at Longmoor in the 60's were painted in blue but I am unable to confirm which spec etc but there are loads of photographs from that time in the Longmoor Military Railway Books (3 editions now plus edition 1 reprinted with extra info).
 
As a ex Military Railwayman, for reference ask to join the 'ARMY RAILWAY HERITAGE FACEBOOK PAGE', lots of knowledgeable info on there and there may even be a colour copy of the locomotive available from one of the members.

Deep Bronze Gloss Green was used on the locomotive at 79 Railway Squadron in the mid 70's to early 80's, (I know as I painted loads of them) then the colour of the new locomotives from the mid 80's were supplied in NATO Matt IR Green.

Dark Brunswick Green in gloss was applied to the ambulance coaching stock.

Locomotives at Longmoor in the 60's were painted in blue but I am unable to confirm which spec etc but there are loads of photographs from that time in the Longmoor Military Railway Books (3 editions now plus edition 1 reprinted with extra info).
I vaguely remember seeing photos of that. It was somewhere between Caledonian and Prussian IiRC. May be Royal blue?
 
[U]DB216LOKDVR[/U] Thank you very much for your kind and informative reply. It is always best to hear from those who were there; can't be beaten! It is, though, rolling stock that holds my interest - I have no layout, and doubt that I will ever build one - but I build wagons. These interest me far more than motive power, particularly the specialist types like the Palvan. Mine will depict a vehicle which ran on BR metals. Thanks also for the pointer to the FB page; I shall consider it, though until now I have never had any sort of Social Media account beyond Friends Reunited, which frankly caused more trouble than it was worth.
 
[U]DB216LOKDVR[/U] Thank you very much for your kind and informative reply. It is always best to hear from those who were there; can't be beaten! It is, though, rolling stock that holds my interest - I have no layout, and doubt that I will ever build one - but I build wagons. These interest me far more than motive power, particularly the specialist types like the Palvan. Mine will depict a vehicle which ran on BR metals. Thanks also for the pointer to the FB page; I shall consider it, though until now I have never had any sort of Social Media account beyond Friends Reunited, which frankly caused more trouble than it was worth.
Go on youtube and put in the names of UK Military Depots that were/are railway served, i.e. MARCHWOOD, BICESTER, KITETON, LONG MARSON, LONG TOWN, LONGMOOR, etc and there are video's of these depots being worked with rolling stock and they are mainly in colour. Once you have hit on one then the others will show. (Check the spellings of the Depots as it's late and my eyes are playing up!!!!
 
Don't know if any of you enthusiasts have see it BBC4 Mondays 19:30 Michael Portillo, Railways of the Great War. Episode 4 this coming Monday but available on catch-up.
During the opening credits there's a WW2 engine painted matt black.
 
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The excursion special with a GWR Pullman [for the passenger willing to pay a bit extra] and a GWR restaurant car - we must dine in style on our journey after all, I suspect the bar is very well stocked. I've another three GWR coaches for a suburban set, but they need some bodging due to missing couplings and spares being no longer available.

P1010031.JPG


First set of scenery - courtesy of sister in law at Christmas. Card build - very satisfying
 
A bit of train surgery this evening - fitting DCC decoders. I have the controller, a Gaugemaster Prodigy and will shortly be obtaining the track to construct the second loop.

IMG_0158 (Edited).JPG
 
Excuse Mr Thicky, but is that the motor in the tender.? If so whys that, why not in the engine?
In the 70's Triang Wrenn made the A4 class in metal in BR Green, LNER Blue, and Silver/Grey named Silver Fox. The T/W version had the engine in the locomotive and the tender was a towalong, some tender versions were made from plastic & some from metal. The heavier metal tender version seemed to ride better on the rail as the plastic tenders were very light. The trick at the time was to stuff the plastic tender body with putty/lead or similar material to give it some weight.

When Hornby was brought out (after they brought out Triang, after Triang brought out Wrenn, or something similar, same locomotive in different coloured boxes), new style and more powerful motors were developed which did not fit in the locomotive bodies but fitted well in the box shaped tenders. The introduction of more realistic sounds cards and more accurate fine detail on locomotive bodies left the only place to put the motor etc was in the tender.
 
In the 70's Triang Wrenn made the A4 class in metal in BR Green, LNER Blue, and Silver/Grey named Silver Fox. The T/W version had the engine in the locomotive and the tender was a towalong, some tender versions were made from plastic & some from metal. The heavier metal tender version seemed to ride better on the rail as the plastic tenders were very light. The trick at the time was to stuff the plastic tender body with putty/lead or similar material to give it some weight.

When Hornby was brought out (after they brought out Triang, after Triang brought out Wrenn, or something similar, same locomotive in different coloured boxes), new style and more powerful motors were developed which did not fit in the locomotive bodies but fitted well in the box shaped tenders. The introduction of more realistic sounds cards and more accurate fine detail on locomotive bodies left the only place to put the motor etc was in the tender.
I’m guessing it’s a space thing. The motor drives the loco wheels via a drive shaft
Propulsion is achieved by the motor driving the tender's wheels. The loco's wheels are (just) dummies.

Which raises the bizarre prospect of a (model) tender on its own, hauling a rake of carriages/waggons, with the "dumb" loco left in the siding/box ?! ;) .

NO!! One of the electric pickups is through the loco wheels. The other through the tender's wheels. The two HAVE to be coupled together for electricity to pass through the electric motor.
 
Propulsion is achieved by the motor driving the tender's wheels. The loco's wheels are (just) dummies.

Which raises the bizarre prospect of a (model) tender on its own, hauling a rake of carriages/waggons, with the "dumb" loco left in the siding/box ?! ;) .

NO!! One of the electric pickups is through the loco wheels. The other through the tender's wheels. The two HAVE to be coupled together for electricity to pass through the electric motor.
Not in my Dapol A4 it isn’t. The tender motor drives the loco wheels via the drive shaft. That’s how it works. Disconnects the shaft and nothing moves. The main drive wheels also have traction tyres for added grip. Some larger scale models may use tender drive. I recall my OO Duchess of many years ago was such
 

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