Empty Cartrige cases: Controlled items in the UK

lert

LE
I did not know that the Caribou are armed!!!!

Did he shoot back?
Wouldn't have mattered if he did.

Looking at the pic, the position and hold may be firm enough to support the weapon. But no chance of the weapon pointing naturally at the target without any undue physical effort.

Not going to hit anything without applying the principles correctly.
 
Random brass is okay for non too serious shooting and at shorter ranges, no use for long range precision.

I don't know about that mate, I use once fired brass for shooting on my own 400 yard range and I've used it for shooting out to a thousand yards as well on the range just outside of town. I guess it's all in the preparation of the brass before loading as shooting once fired brass has never been a problem for me.
 
I think I bought a thousand rounds to kick off when I moved here. Now I have three five gallon buckets full of brass for reloading that I picked up on the range. And those three bucket fulls were picked up on one range in a couple of months, as and when.

I’m not a rifle shooter, but I see blokes shooting rifle using top end ammo and just binning the cases when fired.

The very first rifle I bought back when I first arrived here was a honey blonde No4 MkII Lee Enfield rifle. I used and still use the rifle for deer hunting, the Enfield cost me $60. Ammo for it was abundant, there used to be loads of Greek and South African mil surplus .303 ammo around and that was cheap as chips as well.

It was when I used to see loads of empty cases at the range I thought that I'd like to get into hand loading and did, been doing it ever since, I also find reloading relaxing as well, that and the fact it gets me out on the range just about every day trying out new loads that take my fancy.
 
Wouldn't have mattered if he did.

Looking at the pic, the position and hold may be firm enough to support the weapon. But no chance of the weapon pointing naturally at the target without any undue physical effort.

Not going to hit anything without applying the principles correctly.
That photo showed the anti-aircraft position.

Damned un-sporting to shoot it when the said animal was shooting down aircraft.
 

lert

LE
That photo showed the anti-aircraft position.

Damned un-sporting to shoot it when the said animal was shooting down aircraft.
Unless, of course, it was shot from the aircraft in a strafing pass?

This is why stand-off weapons were invented. Damned dangerous to shoot a caribou when well aimed fire could bring you down.
 
The very first rifle I bought back when I first arrived here was a honey blonde No4 MkII Lee Enfield rifle. I used and still use the rifle for deer hunting, the Enfield cost me $60. Ammo for it was abundant, there used to be loads of Greek and South African mil surplus .303 ammo around and that was cheap as chips as well.

It was when I used to see loads of empty cases at the range I thought that I'd like to get into hand loading and did, been doing it ever since, I also find reloading relaxing as well, that and the fact it gets me out on the range just about every day trying out new loads that take my fancy.

Question for you: Other than that little TSA linky do you have any other official pointers to being allowed to take cartridge cases out of the country? I have emailed the State Dept regarding this, but from what I have heard from another individual who wanted to export cases is that it took them 6 months to reply. Even then he only received a one line answer which did not clarify the situation.

Hardly surprising people get slapped with ITAR prosecutions and fines.
 
Question for you: Other than that little TSA linky do you have any other official pointers to being allowed to take cartridge cases out of the country? I have emailed the State Dept regarding this, but from what I have heard from another individual who wanted to export cases is that it took them 6 months to reply. Even then he only received a one line answer which did not clarify the situation.

Hardly surprising people get slapped with ITAR prosecutions and fines.

The only thing I can find is that it's not a prohibited from taking out of the US.
 

Mufulira42

Old-Salt
Boyds told me if it’s a two piece stock with a value over $100 then they legally ship in one parcel but declared as two separate items!
Boyds were pretty good at getting around the rules!
For Dies I tend to go to Redding who charge a lot but deliver on their promises

I’ve lost two packets of fired brass en route to die manufacturers despite declaring them! I’m sure it’s our post office that impounds them
IIRC I was to be one of your benificiaries 2021 in deep dark Canada when you kindly forwarded a sample batch of brass, fired, spent primers extracted or they are still whirling around some benighted depot while I was engaged in remodelling a P17 30-06 to 7mm Mk1 NATO {7mmx 43}
 
The only thing I can find is that it's not a prohibited from taking out of the US.

Was that just from that TSA linky, or somewhere else?

I have also written to Dillon to ascertain whether, or not, I will need an export licence for taking out my presses. I don't think I will. As I recall @flying_felix when he was here mentioned that he had picked up a dillon from the factory in Az. and taken it back to the UK with him.



SURPRISE.

This morning I received a response from the State Department (they must have read me bad mouthing them) which was about as useful as an ashtray on a motorcycle. I asked two clear questions and was simply given pointers to websites containing reams of legalese, and also a pointer to the Department of Commerce, who have apparently taken over what were some of the lighter ITAR admin duties. Their (unfinished) website is about as useful as an ashtray on a motorcycle too.
 
Was that just from that TSA linky, or somewhere else?

I have also written to Dillon to ascertain whether, or not, I will need an export licence for taking out my presses. I don't think I will. As I recall @flying_felix when he was here mentioned that he had picked up a dillon from the factory in Az. and taken it back to the UK with him.



SURPRISE.

This morning I received a response from the State Department (they must have read me bad mouthing them) which was about as useful as an ashtray on a motorcycle. I asked two clear questions and was simply given pointers to websites containing reams of legalese, and also a pointer to the Department of Commerce, who have apparently taken over what were some of the lighter ITAR admin duties. Their (unfinished) website is about as useful as an ashtray on a motorcycle too.

That was just having a look around. I took 500 rounds of brass back to the UK not long before the covid outbreak and it wasn't the first time either. I never had a problem with it.

I did however once get questioned by armed Police at Heathrow on my way back to the US when a couple of pistol casings were found in the side pocket of a carry on bag I used to use as a range bag.
 

Mufulira42

Old-Salt
That was just having a look around. I took 500 rounds of brass back to the UK not long before the covid outbreak and it wasn't the first time either. I never had a problem with it.

I did however once get questioned by armed Police at Heathrow on my way back to the US when a couple of pistol casings were found in the side pocket of a carry on bag I used to use as a range bag.
And what did the fine chaps in blue make you do with spent cases?
 
What amuses me is the comparative ease with which it possible to purchase weapons in the US but once purchased they make it almost impossible to export them from the US.
 
And what did the fine chaps in blue make you do with spent cases?

Not much, they asked me a couple of questions and sent me on my way. They didn't take the shell casings.
 
What amuses me is the comparative ease with which it possible to purchase weapons in the US but once purchased they make it almost impossible to export them from the US.

Believe me when I say it's just as big a PITA going the other way. When we moved here I had to fill in reams of paperwork and get and an export agent in the UK to send my firearms over and a import agent here in the US to receive.

Even then it was a while before I saw them again because I couldn't claim them until I got my permanent residency/green card.
 
Last edited:
Believe me when I say it's just as big a PITA going the other way. When we moved here I had to fill in reams of paperwork and get and an export agent in the UK to send my firearms over and a import agent here in the US to receive.

Even then it was a while before I saw them again because I couldn't claim them until I got my permanent residency/green.

I met a chap from Switzerland on a shooting course here. He attends the course every year, or two, as a refresher to stay on top of his game. He does all the paperwork required to have his pistol accompany him out of Switzerland and into the US. He told me it is a bigger pain in the arrse at the Swiss end when leaving than it is when arriving in the USA where at ATL he reckons he almost has to wake up the cuzzers to make them look at his docs and get the appropriate stempels and signatures. He reckoned that all they are interested in on both sides is the number on the frame, which prompts him to buy a very large handful of magazines whenever he comes over.
 

Gone2ratshat

Old-Salt
I don't know about that mate, I use once fired brass for shooting on my own 400 yard range and I've used it for shooting out to a thousand yards as well on the range just outside of town. I guess it's all in the preparation of the brass before loading as shooting once fired brass has never been a problem for me.
For long range precision its critical to keep any variables to a minimum so case H2o capacity is measured ( by weight ) and cases are graded , then theres neck tension and so on, it becomes an obsession with some shooters , but you have to do it for precision , some of the guys I shoot with are shooting 1/2 moa at 1760 yards/ 1 mile.
 
For long range precision its critical to keep any variables to a minimum so case H2o capacity is measured ( by weight ) and cases are graded , then theres neck tension and so on, it becomes an obsession with some shooters , but you have to do it for precision , some of the guys I shoot with are shooting 1/2 moa at 1760 yards/ 1 mile.

I do all of the above routinely, even when just shooting at 100 yards say for zero or hunting you will find my hand loads are all the same.

The longest shot I have taken on a live moving target was at 800 yards plus on a Pronghorn Antelope and that was after crawling on my belly for a couple of hours to get that close to take the shot. That round went exactly where I wanted it to hit.
 

Mufulira42

Old-Salt
I met a chap from Switzerland on a shooting course here. He attends the course every year, or two, as a refresher to stay on top of his game. He does all the paperwork required to have his pistol accompany him out of Switzerland and into the US. He told me it is a bigger pain in the arrse at the Swiss end when leaving than it is when arriving in the USA where at ATL he reckons he almost has to wake up the cuzzers to make them look at his docs and get the appropriate stempels and signatures. He reckoned that all they are interested in on both sides is the number on the frame, which prompts him to buy a very large handful of magazines whenever he comes over.
IIRC a fine chap of Oz extraction and an avid big-bore shooter who purchased a .50 semi-auto Rifle and leaves it stored in Nevada and visits NV yearly to shatter his ear drums and touch targets ever so far away. Happiness all round.
 
IIRC a fine chap of Oz extraction and an avid big-bore shooter who purchased a .50 semi-auto Rifle and leaves it stored in Nevada and visits NV yearly to shatter his ear drums and touch targets ever so far away. Happiness all round.

Not as easy as it sounds. He must have someone who bought it on his behalf and keeps it locked away for him.

If I do depart I shall be leaving a Glock and a shotgun behind so that I can come back and play at my convenience.
 

Gone2ratshat

Old-Salt
I do all of the above routinely, even when just shooting at 100 yards say for zero or hunting you will find my hand loads are all the same.

The longest shot I have taken on a live moving target was at 800 yards plus on a Pronghorn Antelope and that was after crawling on my belly for a couple of hours to get that close to take the shot. That round went exactly where I wanted it to hit.
What caliber and rifle you using ?
 

Latest Threads

Top