Electoral Registration - The Law?

#1
assembled Gentlepersons, your wisdom if you will...

i've just recieved an electoral registration form from my local, and apparently illiterate, district council. it says that i am required by law to register, and that either failing to do so, or providing false information, is liable to a fine not exceeding £1000.

now, what it doesn't do is say 'you must provide this information by X date or you will be deemed to be in contravention of the Act' (or whatever), just that you must do it, and please do it by Y date. i've checked the small print, i've re-read it, i'm absolutely sure that there is no cut-off date specified on the form.

for personal reasons i'd, for the moment, prefer to be as invisible to the wider world as possible - and by happy circumstance i find that they've spealt my surname incorrectly, turning it into a much more common name that is quite different to my surname.

so, fair arrsers, what is the situation: is this another law thats got a bit missing that means its unenforcable, is it actually enforcable, but nobody actually does so, and if i were to return the form with my usual appalling handwriting/signature and sadly having failed to notice that they'd spealt my name incorrectly, would there be any comeback?

to clarify - i'm out, i've no need for any financial products, i don't bother voting in local elections - and actually, i have a political problem with being required to partake in democracy: it seems somewhat oxy-moronic to me...

cheers.
 

skid2

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
Anything addressed to an associates place in Derry titled The Occupier. The youngest one in the house delivered it to the army base up the street. I thought it was funny, still do
 
T

Tremaine

Guest
#6
The letters are speculative fishing for the great unregistered, who haven't bothered or don't wish to be found. Though there's always your Doctor's records, used by credit firms and collectors. There are two versions of the register - the full version and the edited version. Your details will appear on the full version of the register, but you can 'opt out' " on the registration form. The full register is "used for elections, preventing and detecting crime", and checking applications for credit. The edited register is available for general sale and can be used for commercial activities such as marketing and finding credit defaulters. It may be that opting out will not prevent disclosures to credit reference agencies.

Registering to vote - About my vote, produced by The Electoral Commission
 
#7
Or do as one old soldier (in his 80's) down my street does, and tell thems when they visit that he's a member of the Armed Forces and does the postal vote, keeps them off his back for a short while.
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
s13D(1) Representation Of The People Act 1983 applies. The provision of any false information is an offence.

The penalties as set out in s13D(6) of that Act are:

A term of imprisonment not exceeding 51 weeks, or;
A penalty not exceeding level 5 on the standard scale. or;
Both.

A false signature constitutes "false information" for the purposes of the Act.
 
#11
me too...

has anyone heard of anyone getting done for not bothering to send back the Electoral Registration forms - or is it just 'do what you like, we don't care...'?
I have not been registered to vote since 2009 and have had nothing to tell me I'm a bad boy.
I don't think the local government gives a shit what you do.
The electoral registration forms go in the bin every year.
And will continue to do so.
 
#12
assembled Gentlepersons, your wisdom if you will...

i've just recieved an electoral registration form from my local, and apparently illiterate, district council. it says that i am required by law to register, and that either failing to do so, or providing false information, is liable to a fine not exceeding £1000.

now, what it doesn't do is say 'you must provide this information by X date or you will be deemed to be in contravention of the Act' (or whatever), just that you must do it, and please do it by Y date. i've checked the small print, i've re-read it, i'm absolutely sure that there is no cut-off date specified on the form.

for personal reasons i'd, for the moment, prefer to be as invisible to the wider world as possible - and by happy circumstance i find that they've spealt my surname incorrectly, turning it into a much more common name that is quite different to my surname.

so, fair arrsers, what is the situation: is this another law thats got a bit missing that means its unenforcable, is it actually enforcable, but nobody actually does so, and if i were to return the form with my usual appalling handwriting/signature and sadly having failed to notice that they'd spealt my name incorrectly, would there be any comeback?

to clarify - i'm out, i've no need for any financial products, i don't bother voting in local elections - and actually, i have a political problem with being required to partake in democracy: it seems somewhat oxy-moronic to me...

cheers.
I have just had one of those too. Mine did have a date on it, in that it came with an accompanying note explaining that it was sent early this year so that it could be processed in time for the forthcomming Police Commissioner Election.

However, it made it very clear that they only wanted it posted back if things had changed. Otherwise they preferred it returned by SMS (no signature) or on-line (again no wet signature) or by telephone. Problem was though with opting out of the full register. The letter said that they couldn't pre-tick the opt out box and opting out was only valid for a year via that form. So, as ticking that box constituted a change I felt there was no alternative but to post it back.

Silly buggers...
 
#13
I've been off the roll for 11 years, never even been brought up.
 
T

Tremaine

Guest
#14
ISTR that a Data Protection Notice can be sent to the Electoral Registration Officer stating your preference to Opt Out until further notice.
 
#15
I just replied online as nothing had changed, it was the second one in less than a year as well as some letter asking me to confirm my adress for "council tax" purposes despite the fact I still pay it and nothing has changed.

I used the feed back section to tell them if I intend to move house then I will tell them, until then they can stop snooping on people via the electoral process.
 
#16
Mine tends to stay in my to do pile and then I just forget.The last two years they have come to the house though,always in the evening, I guess to catch more people at home around 7pm.
 
#17
Being off the electoral roll is not so much of a problem- only area it's likely to impact is credit application checks. It means of course that someone missing from the roll is not going to be called to vote or to serve on a jury- no big deal for a lot of folk.

A much greater problem is non-entitled folk getting themselves on the roll. If you are not entitled (ie by being a UK or Irish citizen-EU citizen also but they have limited voting rights), getting on the roll gives a bit more credibility. Not just that, it's also a great help in identity fraud to be on the roll.

All that someone has to do is put their name on the form and ignore the bit about citizenship. Sometimes a genuine mistake-often deliberate.

It also means that loads of non-British (or Irish) citizens can vote in UK elections- ideal perhaps for the theory of democracy but not so good if they are voting on partisan grounds.

But a perhaps bigger downside is that non-qualified people are being selected for jury service- very rarely does anyone pull out, I understand, on the grounds of their lack of English skills. Not good for the justice system if a juror can't follow the trial because they have difficulty in understanding what's going on.
 

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