Election seat calculator

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by stoatman, Apr 11, 2005.

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  1. Anybody who still doubts that the constituency boundaries are heavily weighted in Labour's favour should click on the following link, which represents the result if Labour get 50% of the vote and the Conservatives get 50%, with other parties getting none:

    http://news3.thdo.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/vote2005/seatcalculator/html/default.stm?resultsMode=TRUE&dataset=uk&LAB=50&CON=50&LD=0&OTH=0&mode=CALCULATE+RESULTS

    Labour win 380 seats, Conservative 248 - i.e. a Labour majority of 114 would result! 8O

    Also interesting is to swap the Con & Lab votes from last time around whilst leaving the others unchanged:

    http://news3.thdo.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/vote2005/seatcalculator/html/default.stm?resultsMode=TRUE&dataset=uk&LAB=32.0&CON=41&LD=18.0&OTH=9.0&mode=CALCULATE+RESULTS

    A result which led to a landslide majority of 154 for Labour would result in a majority of just 12 for the Conservatives.

    Add some industrial-scale vote-rigging into the proceedings, and it looks rather like the system is biased towards a certain party... :roll:
     
  2. Staotman, thanks for that.

    Interesting to put in the current percentages from onebigvote.co.uk, Con overall majority = 78
     
  3. If we don't get rid of NuLab this time we may not get another chance, ever.

    The BBC calculator indicates that the Tory/Lab ratio needs to be at least 55.9/44.1 for the Tories to win.
     
  4. I think the Conservatives will get 48%, Labour 41% and the
    Lib Dem's 9%.
     
  5. Someone said in 1997 that if New Labour get in, you'll never get them out again. I think they were talking about proportional representation but I think the sentiment has stood the test of time.