Eire sign uncovered by wildfires

Out of interest, I assume that not all Free State Army deserters went 'North' but remained underground in Eire? if caught what sort of sentences did they receive from Court's Martial in the South?
I believe they were dishonourably discharged and ostracised, more here:

The Irish Deserters

A link to one of the more vocal opponents to the deserters:

Thomas F. O'Higgins - Wikipedia

Finally, the radio 4 programme that raised awareness of the entire issue:

BBC Radio 4 - Face the Facts, The Disowned Army

@tiger stacker, the link will appeal to you as I know you are a fan of the old wireless.
 
Out of interest, I assume that not all Free State Army deserters went 'North' but remained underground in Eire? if caught what sort of sentences did they receive from Court's Martial in the South?
No idea but likely included jail during the Emergency

After the Emergency same as those to joined the British Army
 
From the historian Brian Barton. Between Sept 41 to May 45,11,500 persons from NI enlisted,and 18,600 from Eire were formally approved in the Northern Ireland recruiting area. He suggests that a powerful folk memory of the losses in the Ulster Division on the Somme in 1916, may be responsible for this.
 
I know I'm always blackguarding on the Irish threads (it's only a bit of messing) but anyway I digress.
I'm thinking of an alternative explanation for the "EIRE"signage,
they were mostly on the western seaboard
and our planes had access by certain corridors to America from the North, and these signs were a reminder to our brylcreem adorned lads to keep within the neutrality rules and not anything to do with the Hun.
 
From the historian Brian Barton. Between Sept 41 to May 45,11,500 persons from NI enlisted,and 18,600 from Eire were formally approved in the Northern Ireland recruiting area.
so leaves out a third of the war and excludes those enlisted in mainland UK

I know I'm always blackguarding on the Irish threads (it's only a bit of messing) but anyway I digress.
I'm thinking of an alternative explanation for the "EIRE"signage,
they were mostly on the western seaboard
and our planes had access by certain corridors to America from the North, and these signs were a reminder to our brylcreem adorned lads to keep within the neutrality rules and not anything to do with the Hun.
They were all around the coast, the coastline being longer on the West side.

There was 1 corridor, which under neutrality we shouldn’t have provided, over Donegal (think it was recce seaplanes from Lough Erne used it
 
so leaves out a third of the war and excludes those enlisted in mainland UK



They were all around the coast, the coastline being longer on the West side.

There was 1 corridor, which under neutrality we shouldn’t have provided, over Donegal (think it was recce seaplanes from Lough Erne used it
but in reality there wasn,t much you could have done to stop the RAF flying over,
wasn,t there Sunderlands parked up down the Foynes area on the Shannon?
 
British Overseas Airways Corporation - Wikipedia
British Overseas Airways Corporation - Wikipedia
British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) was the British state-owned airline created in ... for Britain was shifted from Southampton to Poole, Dorset, but many flights used Foynes in Éire (Ireland), reached by shuttle flight from Whitchurch.
Were these not civil flights, I thought BOAC were a civil organisation. The reason I write this is that I remember reading about Leslie Howard being shot down in a BOAC aircraft by the Luftwaffe and the ensuing controversy after it.

BOAC Flight 777 - Wikipedia

If I am wrong, apologies in advance!
 
Were these not civil flights, I thought BOAC were a civil organisation. The reason I write this is that I remember reading about Leslie Howard being shot down in a BOAC aircraft by the Luftwaffe and the ensuing controversy after it.

BOAC Flight 777 - Wikipedia

If I am wrong, apologies in advance!
Civil aircraft, like merchant ships, were 'fair game'.
The big difference from military craft was that civilian aircraft could fly to/from neutral nations.
BOAC famously had Mosquitos plus a whole bunch of other stuff, Swissair operated Ju52s, the hun flew Condors to Buenos Aires via Lisbon and Dakar, Qantas had the infamous 'flight of two dawns' from Oz to India/Ceylon etc etc etc
 
or anyone else!
All supplies had to come from the UK (or at least via)

there was no basing of allied personnel or equipment in Eire
Yes there was: "The establishment in June 1941 of an armed air/sea rescue trawler, the Robert Hastie, manned by eleven British personnel, at Killybegs, Co. Donegal, was shrouded in secrecy."
The Donegal corridor and the Battle of the Atlantic

There was also an RAF training officer attached to the Irish Air Corps for a bit (advising on Hurricanes)
Not to mention several that paid short visits ie to advise on the construction of Fort Shannon
https://dandadec.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/fort-shannon1.pdf
 

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