Eight Lives Down

#1
Just finished reading it, its fucking superb, have to reccomend it to anyone.
 
#2
Praetorian said:
Just finished reading it, its fucking superb, have to reccomend it to anyone.
Read it when it came out, the one about Felix; it's excellent :D
 
#5
he mentions the death of baha musa in there at the hands of the british army during august 2003, he says it was fuslilers, 2nd battalion if my memory serves me right.
thats wrong, it was a member of 1 qlr who commited the offence
there are some other things said that seem to have been said to make the writer out to be better on certain levels and also some accounts of events that the information he gives and the time frames wouldnt fit in with what happens on the ground.
 
#7
I'm about halfway through this now, and its not bad so far. The writing isn't as slick as others though.
 

Mr Happy

LE
Moderator
#9


amazon says

Review
A British Royal Logistic Corps captain shares his experiences of front-line service in Iraq.Trained in IRA and Colombian FARC tactics of bomb construction, 31-year-old Hunter shipped out to Iraq in 2004 for a 101-day tour disposing of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and rooting out bomber teams. Despite his disgruntled wife (she wanted him back home in Oxfordshire) and two small daughters, Hunter admits that after 13 years on the job he still found its dangers and risks exhilarating. That may not be the adjective that comes to readers' minds as they peruse his narrative, written as a present-tense diary of his tour of duty. IEDs created havoc for the troops in some 2,000 attacks a month, and sniffing out insurgents and their homemade bombs in a country where Westerners were angrily resented was perilous and extremely dicey work. Soldiers were both witting and unwitting provokers of disaster. Hunter saw a husband give his pregnant wife a severe beating after her burqa slipped and the British gazed at her face. He did nothing, he later explained to his men, because he'd heard about what happened when some fellow soldiers retaliated against a man who had beaten his 11-year-old daughter - the father cut her throat "to save his honor." Neutralizing banks of explosives was a punishing, thankless task, and Hunter was frequently plagued by guilt and sadness about the violence he and the Americans inflicted. Eventually, he had to say goodbye to the other blokes (lots of jocular Briticisms here); he was promoted to major and got a desk job as a staff officer, leaving the situation in Iraq much the same as when he arrived. Ponderous platitudes from Gandhi to Gilda Radner form epigraphs to each chapter but don't add much gravitas.Hunter's prose is wooden, his experiences rather formulaic, but he offers singular glimpses of the Iraqis' harsh, hardscrabble lives. (Kirkus Reviews)
 
#10
have now read this. it was interesting, but my enjoyment was tempered by the fact that the author is either the single best ATO in the history of ATOs, or has bigged himself up a little bit. i suspect some who know him under his real name might be a little bemused by his version of how he was almost single-handedly responsible for X, Y and Z.

just a gut feeling you understand. :roll:
 

Mr Happy

LE
Moderator
#11
CRmeansCeilingReached said:
have now read this. it was interesting, but my enjoyment was tempered by the fact that the author is either the single best ATO in the history of ATOs, or has bigged himself up a little bit. i suspect some who know him under his real name might be a little bemused by his version of how he was almost single-handedly responsible for X, Y and Z.

just a gut feeling you understand. :roll:
In the defence of the author - whom I do not know - editors/publishers often try to get stories simplified by cutting out characters and putting their actions in the heroes activity.

If you imagine you know everyone in your Sqn or Coy and wanted to write a book about what happened in a 6 month tour, you couldn't spread the stories of the characters around and have someone that's just picked up the book understand it, let alone a civvie or a yank..

so for clarities sake, they take all the stories and bung them in one bloke. IIRC, Condor Blues mentions far to many characters to be properly followed.
 
#12
I wouldn't say I know the bloke, but I did meet him and discuss some of his experiences in a professional capacity a while back. He didn't come across as especially arrogant, conceited or prone to exaggeration - in fact, rather the opposite. Unfortunately, self-effacement and modesty don't really sell war books, and I reckon Mr H is right that the editors/publishers may have 'sexed it up' a little.
 
#15
I'm about three quarters through. It is really good so far, don't remember reeading a better book about the recent wars. I'm not an expert on EOD stuff but it all rings pretty true to me from what I do know. Good book!
 

Similar threads

Top