Egypt Air Flight missing

#2
It's out of fuel by now and still overdue so it's definitely down.

Three security agents on board. And about sixty passengers so I would have thought hijack unlikely. Went missing 10 miles (1 minute) inside Egyptian airspace - well transponder stopped transmitting.

Not good.
 
#3
News channels here in the US are saying no weather problems in the area.
One station said US Navy is sending resources to the area but it was unclear if they were talking about ships or planes.
 
#4
Given the amount off Navy assets in the area for the migrant crises I would imagine they'll be able to get a few ships in the area sharpish.
 
#5
BBC saying whatever happened it must have been a, "Catastrophic event". In other words, it was so fast there was no chance to send any distress signal.
 
#6
Given the amount off Navy assets in the area for the migrant crises I would imagine they'll be able to get a few ships in the area sharpish.
BBC saying they are sending ships to a specific area, so they must have a good idea where the poor buggers went down.
 
#7
Last known position on the ADS-B @ 00:29:30

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#8
The New York Times cites Ehab Mohy el-Deen, head of the Egyptian air navigation authority.

He says Greek air traffic controllers notified their Egyptian counterparts that they had lost contact with the plane, the NYT reports.

They did not radio for help or lose altitude. They just vanished.

He said it was too early to speculate on causes and outcomes, “but this is not normal, of course”.
 
#9
Got to be a bomb on board or a missile. 37,000ft means you'd need more than a Manpad and you'd be looking to launch from a boat and in that area the Pentagon would have a satellite trained on you about three seconds after the mx launch was detected by the NRO.

So I would go with time/barometric triggered bomb. Million dollar question being was it planted in Cairo or in Paris...
 
#10
Last known position on the ADS-B @ 00:29:30
Please bear in mind that sites like flight radar 24 which show ADS B data is not what ATC are using to track the aircraft. ADS B has very limited use by ATC.
 
#11
Yeah, I know, but it's pretty accurate nonetheless - with the exception of some 'speshul' stuff that's time delayed.
 
#12
Yeah, I know, but it's pretty accurate nonetheless - with the exception of some 'speshul' stuff that's time delayed.
As long as you ignore the fact - its predicted position over water out of ground station range which results in some odd effects as aircraft again become tracked and FR24 reconciles predicted and actual position and of course that not all aircraft have ADSB.
 
#13
Got to be a bomb on board or a missile. 37,000ft means you'd need more than a Manpad and you'd be looking to launch from a boat and in that area the Pentagon would have a satellite trained on you about three seconds after the mx launch was detected by the NRO.

So I would go with time/barometric triggered bomb. Million dollar question being was it planted in Cairo or in Paris...
Don't rule out Ship launched anti air missile - havn't the Americans done that before (by mistake).

Suicide by pilot

Catastrophic failure

I tend to agree its likely a bomb though.

Could it have been the aircraft was descending for landing and overland or would Flight Radar have picked it up?
 
#14
Yeah, I know, but it's pretty accurate nonetheless - with the exception of some 'speshul' stuff that's time delayed.
Not aware of any delay (you can plug an ADS B aerial into your PC at home for a very few quid and pick up the signals yourself), military aircraft are not equipped with ADS B squitters (except some transports). Last time I checked the figures in the London region only 92% of aircraft had ADS B, outside Europe it'll be a lot less particularly with older aircraft.
 
#15
As long as you ignore the fact - its predicted position over water out of ground station range which results in some odd effects as aircraft again become tracked and FR24 reconciles predicted and actual position and of course that not all aircraft have ADSB.
Yeah, I know that as well, but it's a good indicator of likely area to start searching in (if there's nothing else to go by) - not that naval assets will be using FR24 or Planefinder.
 
#16
Missile off a ship is challenging because you're bobbing about and need to stabilize the radar. You can't run away at more than about twenty knots and the NRO will be tracking you all the way.

Missile from the coast would have to be a proper SAM like a BUK system. Again, military Intel are all over those all the time.

Pilot suicide is possible, often pilots leave the flight deck for a wee prior to reaching the top of descent point so that fits with one pilot being alone in the flight deck. Switch the transponder off and stuff it in the sea like MH370. I could buy that.

It has to be a pretty big or well placed bomb to bring you down without a mayday call.
 
#17
Yeah, I know that as well, but it's a good indicator of likely area to start searching in
ATC will have a much more accurate indication than the toy that is FR24, thats why countries spend millions on primary and secondary radar.

Just had a look at public info on ADS B:
"Europe has delayed the mandate for ADS-B out equipage in its airspace. The earliest ADS-B out requirement in Europe was Jan. 8, 2015, for new aircraft, with retrofit installations due Dec. 7, 2017. The new dates are June 8, 2016, for new aircraft and June 7, 2020, for retrofit.

The revised date for retrofits is more closely aligned with the U.S. ADS-B out mandate, which requires the equipment to be operational in aircraft that fly where transponders are currently required after midnight on Dec. 31, 2019. While some aircraft owners and operators are no doubt hoping that the U.S. mandate will be delayed"
Europe Delays ADS-B out Equipment Mandate
 
#18
Snip - speculation stuff I don't want to discuss-

Could it have been the aircraft was descending for landing and overland or would Flight Radar have picked it up?

Fr24 would show its decent until it went below the horizon or out of range, I'm not sure what it does viz prediction on altitude - Hdg and ground speed remain last known until the next ground station - Alt I'm assuming remains as last known rather than last rate of change.
 
#19
Not aware of any delay (you can plug an ADS B aerial into your PC at home for a very few quid and pick up the signals yourself), military aircraft are not equipped with ADS B squitters (except some transports). Last time I checked the figures in the London region only 92% of aircraft had ADS B, outside Europe it'll be a lot less particularly with older aircraft.
The delay concerns FAA supplied data - a 5 min delay. They appear as orange icons rather than the usual yellow. The Voyagers have ADS-B as do some choppers. The amount of stuff kitted out is growing daily - even gliders. But you already know that.
 

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