Effect of Artillery Fire

#2
The Sappers must have worked overtime setting up all those Batsims.
 
#4
Remember going on a visit to a bunker at Larkhill, inside the impact area, to feel the effects of shelling. Wasn't half as impressive as that though.
It was better being at the other end with an Abbot battery on a fire mission out in BATUS.
 
#5
Vintage indeed, I remember that the first time around.

Arr and they were praper roifles them were 'n all.
Nurse I think it's time fer me pills!
 
#7
He he, if you were Inf running through our batsims that wasn't mud you got spattered with :D
 
#8
Blimey, that 'Colonel' with the broken nose in the CP is DAH Green.
 
A

Aleegee1698

Guest
#9
Shit FOO and OPAcks, all rounds ground-burst against Infantry in open, fuze should have been set to 18m air-burst.

Tsk! But the Cold-war Warriors kicked their asses back to Moscow!
 
#11
Drove the FOO OPV warrior on Med Man 2 in '93, and the crazy fool would have us right on the edge of the last safe moment(?), bombing forward with the RDG battlegroup as rounds were raining in only a couple of hundred metres in front of us.

Must say very impressive but ******* unnerving. As much as I felt relatively safe in the OPV, I was aware of 155mm hailstones

Must say that I've probably haven't had a better piss-up with anyone anywhere that I had with the guys from 26 FD RA that summer

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A

Aleegee1698

Guest
#12
Drove the FOO OPV warrior on Med Man 2 in '93, and the crazy fool would have us right on the edge of the last safe moment(?), bombing forward with the RDG battlegroup as rounds were raining in only a couple of hundred metres in front of us.

Must say very impressive but ******* unnerving. As much as I felt relatively safe in the OPV, I was aware of 155mm hailstones

Must say that I've probably haven't had a better piss-up with anyone anywhere that I had with the guys from 26 FD RA that summer

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You sure that was 93? Was it 159 Bty? Or was it 92 with 17 Bty? I m using a net-book, cant see the faces.
 
#13
You sure that was 93? Was it 159 Bty? Or was it 92 with 17 Bty? I m using a net-book, cant see the faces.
I knew you'ld ask that. TBH I can't totally remember, although 17 (Corunna) Bty does ring a bell. It was deffo 1993. I was married in '92, posted out to Gütersloh later that year, then along with ½ Dz other RLC, volunteered to gun-bunny, drive, etc. in the summer of '93. The Bty did back-to-back Med man's (1 & 2) due to Grapple commitments on other Bty's.

Bty names: My FOO was a Capt Armitage, and there was a cracking, albeit slightly unhinged, Black SSgt called Dougie, who stayed till the last moment ensure the last dregs of the Bty made in on the plane. :)
 
#14
Anyone here remember 7 RHA's jolly little "danger close familiarisation" at Otterburn, circa 1987?

Idea was to try and emulate a WW1-style creeping barrage; which meant advancing on foot to within about 30m of the shellbursts, hitting the deck every time one came overhead inbound - and hoping it wasn't the "rugby squad" No1s laying the guns at the other end.... Think I had tinnitus - and cramp in my ring piece - for a week afterwards. I have to say it was probably the most enlightening bit of training I experienced outside of operational contact, though.

I wonder if anyone will ever experience a WW1/WW2 intensity of barrage ever again? Can you imagine what it must have been like to be on the receiving end of a million+ shells for eight to ten hours at a time?
 
A

Aleegee1698

Guest
#17
I knew you'ld ask that. TBH I can't totally remember, although 17 (Corunna) Bty does ring a bell. It was deffo 1993. I was married in '92, posted out to Gütersloh later that year, then along with ½ Dz other RLC, volunteered to gun-bunny, drive, etc. in the summer of '93. The Bty did back-to-back Med man's (1 & 2) due to Grapple commitments on other Bty's.

Bty names: My FOO was a Capt Armitage, and there was a cracking, albeit slightly unhinged, Black SSgt called Dougie, who stayed till the last moment ensure the last dregs of the Bty made in on the plane. :)
Yep, must of been 17, Dougie ( he s a Fireman now over here) was in 17 his whole time with the Regt I believe. I did two Meds, one with my Bty and the other with 17, but I was certain it was 92.

Oh well, spose I m getting old.
 
#18
Can you imagine what it must have been like to be on the receiving end of a million+ shells for eight to ten hours at a time?
I don't want to. Six well aimed mortar rounds was enough to put me off my food for a day.
 
#19
Lovely film. Esp the rousing mention of the power of the Divisional Artillery barrage at 150 rounds per minute at the end ;-)

Of course, no mention of the WP 'Divisional' artillery barrage that would have preceded the deliberate attack, and iirc dwarfed the UK equivalent.

It's also answered a question first raised (to my knoweldge) by "Hands and McGowan" in 'Dont Cry For Me, Sergeant-Major'; British squaddies really cannot count - every time the FOO orders "three rounds for effect" they let off every gun in the battery. :)
 
#20
Only artillery I've any experience with was the old WWII 25pdr.
Once asked if I'd like to go forward to observe an Infantry advance behind a creeping barrage (and under fixed MG fire - them, not us).
Stood there with our regimental shells warbling overhead and suddenly remembered that, the day before, I'd 'fixed' the little conical range computer thing, whose correct name escapes me, on one of the guns - "Oohh, er missus!" :)
 

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