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Would squaddies make a better polfor?

  • No

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  • Yes

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#2
Ex forces i think generally are better suited to roles of influence and discipline.

Police, Prison Service, Teachers, Security etc I think are roles where military background would have a good affect.
 
#3
Fronting any Police Interview Board, be it for promotion, transfer to a specialist position or simply as a candidate to join the police, being Ex Forces with an Honourable Discharge will stand the applicant in good stead, especially if there are Ex Forces on the Board :wink: but it doesn't necessarily make them a better police officer than say a person who was a Salesman in Burtons or a Bank Clerk with the Belfast Savings Bank.

In my view those who settle into the job and become good solid Plods are those who have the maturity gained through the hard knocks of making a living in the hard cruel world of trade, commerce and industry, rather than coming straight from College or University with very little or no work experience.

In days gone by the recruitment policy of the Royal Irish Constabulary was to recruit men straight from the plough - for they were known to be slow but steady.

 
#5
Dontdreamit said:
Civvies ringing up saying the solution to crime in the UK would be to encourage more ex-army into the Police Force as they have the necassary mindset to tackle inner city crime, especially violence and gun crime.P
This is sadly, just another cliched argument which pops up from time to time.

To some extent the suggestion holds substance but there are obvious flaws. For example an IT Techie in civvie street and his army counterpart will be as useless as each other as Police patrols although there will be the odd exception.

Most people with a decent trade will be off in that direction.

Of the 'suitable' people remaining, a good proportion will already have a criminal record or be on the way to acquiring one.

Which leaves the minority who leave the Forces and join a Police Service. Well they already do and it makes no difference. All the comment means is that there is an opinion that someone else can pick up the tab for sorting out society, just so long as it doesn't require any time effort or money.
 
#6
I can speak about a couple of forces who actively prevent ex forces recruitment.They prefer minorities(priority one),women(priority two) or people with degrees in underwater knitting.Ex Forces have standards and discipline,which they carry with them.PC police recruiters do not like that.Thus we have got some serious rubbish amongst the younger police.
 
#7
9 years served in the RMP, 7 Op tours, 3 Police applications and on not one have I got past the application form stage despite help from many with police connections in completing it.
 
#10
Mag_to_grid said:
9 years served in the RMP, 7 Op tours, 3 Police applications and on not one have I got past the application form stage despite help from many with police connections in completing it.
Not that I know your policing ability, but keep going for it, depending on what position you are applying for, may be that your over qualified.

It does become demotivating when you see so many knobjockeys making it through when they aint the right ones for the job.

Good Luck, fourth time lucky!!
 
#13
Recently there was a scandel in which it was found police were simply throwing away 10-50% of applications from white men without reading them to get the minority figures up.

If you've had applications turned down without valid reason (i.e. they didn't write to you and say "we have had several applications from people with more experiance than you", which seems unlikely in your case) there should be a formal process you can go through to find out why your application wasn't sucsessful. (If there isn't try a FOI request)

If it turns out that they're pulling a similar stunt again, the Daily Mail will buy your story for more than you'll ever earn as a copper.
 
#16
I spent a brief period in the Army (3 years), followed by 30 years in the Met. The biggest advantage ex-service people bring to the police is their maturity and 'university of life' experience in a disciplined service. They can usually deal with people, in stressful situations, far better than most of their civilian counterparts and be forceful when required.

Having said all that in praise of ex-service people, I also met some 'horrors', who were totally unsuitable and should not have been in the service. Mainly, this was because of their attitude to the public and how they saw themselves in relation to the public. The idea of 'service' did not enter into their minds. It was more about enforcement and misuse of their authority, bullying, if you like.

A good mix of all sorts of people is the best solution. After all the police are supposed to represent society. I had a good police career overall and have no regrets.

I would recommend it to any ex-serviceman, as there is the sort camaraderie you have in the forces. The only downside now is that the conditions of service have changed (from 1/1/07). You now have to complete 35 years service, (not 30 as it use to be) and you only get half pension (of final years pensionable salary) after those 35 years, instead of the two thirds that I received. But two thirds of military service is reckonable for police pension purposes.
 
#18
I don't think being ex-service is in itself a qualification for joining the police. I did 15 years and reckon I'd have made a rubbish bobby .One of the things I acquired in the army was the fact that I don't suffer fools gladly, and that is one thing that the man on the beat has to do ,because the world is full of idiots and the police meet more than there share of them.
 
#19
I was 22 years RMP and passed the assesment centre earlier this year. Just got the fitness assessment to go.
You might as well forget trying to sell your experiences as a military policeman as all they are looking for at the assessment during the roleplay sessions are certain life experiences which you will have described in your initial application pack. When you get the invitation to attend the assessment/role playing you are given lots of indicators as to what they are looking for during the role play. Its a case of telling them what they want to hear not what you have previously done!
I thought the some, not all, of role playing was bollox, but like they say'Bullshit baffles brains'
Good luck with it all.
AJ
 
#20
Dontdreamit said:
Radio talkshow the other day:

Civvies ringing up saying the solution to crime in the UK would be to encourage more ex-army into the Police Force as they have the necassary mindset to tackle inner city crime, especially violence and gun crime.. :D

It IS more pay................... :p
Errr - no.

The police wants social workers providing a public service, as opposed to policemen maintaining social order.
 

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