Eclipse 2006 March 29

#1
Ah, another good excuse to bunk off work and stare at the sky!!!!

On 2006 March 29, a total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from within a narrow corridor which traverses half the Earth. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow begins in Brazil and extends across the Atlantic, northern Africa, and central Asia where it ends at sunset in western Mongolia. A partial eclipse will be seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes the northern two thirds of Africa, Europe, and central Asia.

Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for approximately 350 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile and the sky during totality. Information on safe eclipse viewing and eclipse photography is included
info
 
#2
Simple question - will i be able to see it in sussex ??? - went to the site and it made as much sense as a royal signals op order - but then rocket science never was my strong point
 
#3
OSACIN said:
Simple question - will i be able to see it in sussex ??? - went to the site and it made as much sense as a royal signals op order - but then rocket science never was my strong point
Look at the map. Simple answer is: Not likely.
 
#4
Listy said:
OSACIN said:
Simple question - will i be able to see it in sussex ??? - went to the site and it made as much sense as a royal signals op order - but then rocket science never was my strong point
Look at the map. Simple answer is: Not likely.
Not quite so simpler answer is.

You will see a partial eclipse, if it is not raining or overcast.
Location Name First Contact Fourth Contact Maximum Eclipse Eclip. Mag. Obs. Depth Durat.

ENGLAND
Birmingham 09:47:22.6 11:18:42.8 10:32:34.4 0.245 0.141
Bristol 09:44:55.4 11:16:52.3 10:30:22.9 0.246 0.143
Coventry 09:47:11.4 11:19:24.0 10:32:49.1 0.249 0.145
Leeds 09:50:24.7 11:19:28.8 10:34:31.5 0.234 0.133
Liverpool 09:49:29.1 11:16:37.7 10:32:37.4 0.223 0.124
London 09:45:09.8 11:22:01.4 10:33:04.8 0.0.275 0.168
Manchester 09:49:39.6 11:18:02.4 10:33:25.1 0.230 0.129
Middlesbrough 09:52:05.4 11:20:18.1 10:35:48.2 0.231 0.130
Newcastle 09:52:58. 11:19:38.7 10:35:56.1 0.223 0.123
Nottingham 09:48:27.3 11:20:11.9 10:33:52.4 0.248 0.144
Sheffield 09:49:23.7 11:19:34.7 10:34:02.9 0.240 0.137
Bold column is time of maximum eclipse.
Italics is the amount of eclipse and depth.

If that don't help then go outside tommorow and look up :)
 
#5
Steven said:
Listy said:
OSACIN said:
Simple question - will i be able to see it in sussex ??? - went to the site and it made as much sense as a royal signals op order - but then rocket science never was my strong point
Look at the map. Simple answer is: Not likely.
Not quite so simpler answer is.

You will see a partial eclipse, if it is not raining or overcast.
Location Name First Contact Fourth Contact Maximum Eclipse Eclip. Mag. Obs. Depth Durat.

ENGLAND
Birmingham 09:47:22.6 11:18:42.8 10:32:34.4 0.245 0.141
Bristol 09:44:55.4 11:16:52.3 10:30:22.9 0.246 0.143
Coventry 09:47:11.4 11:19:24.0 10:32:49.1 0.249 0.145
Leeds 09:50:24.7 11:19:28.8 10:34:31.5 0.234 0.133
Liverpool 09:49:29.1 11:16:37.7 10:32:37.4 0.223 0.124
London 09:45:09.8 11:22:01.4 10:33:04.8 0.0.275 0.168
Manchester 09:49:39.6 11:18:02.4 10:33:25.1 0.230 0.129
Middlesbrough 09:52:05.4 11:20:18.1 10:35:48.2 0.231 0.130
Newcastle 09:52:58. 11:19:38.7 10:35:56.1 0.223 0.123
Nottingham 09:48:27.3 11:20:11.9 10:33:52.4 0.248 0.144
Sheffield 09:49:23.7 11:19:34.7 10:34:02.9 0.240 0.137
Bold column is time of maximum eclipse.
Italics is the amount of eclipse and depth.

If that don't help then go outside tommorow and look up :)
Are those times GMT or BST? I suspect GMT as those times will be in UMT.

Litotes
 
#6
Anya1982 said:
Ah, another good excuse to bunk off work and stare at the sky!!!!

On 2006 March 29, a total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from within a narrow corridor which traverses half the Earth. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow begins in Brazil and extends across the Atlantic, northern Africa, and central Asia where it ends at sunset in western Mongolia. A partial eclipse will be seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes the northern two thirds of Africa, Europe, and central Asia.

Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for approximately 350 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile and the sky during totality. Information on safe eclipse viewing and eclipse photography is included
info
I assume, Anya, that you will have a very good view of the eclipse in Cyprus and you will probably have clear skies as well. Lucky!

Litotes
 
#7
I am lucky enough to be smack on the 'path of the Moon's umbral shadow'. I have my eclipse shades (cost me the equivalent of $2) and look forward to witnessing the total eclipse tomorrow.

Some offices have been given a late start so that staff can enjoy the event.

It is a bit overcast today but hopefully it will be all blue skies tomorrow.
 
#8
I experienced the last full eclipse just south of Vienna back in 99 I think it was. A very bizarre experience, appearing almost like night time but with the horizon all around like dawn. Well worth seeing if you ever get the chance.
 
#9
Ord_Sgt said:
I experienced the last full eclipse just south of Vienna back in 99 I think it was. A very bizarre experience, appearing almost like night time but with the horizon all around like dawn. Well worth seeing if you ever get the chance.
I was in Wilton in 2000 for the last major partial eclipse (it was a total eclipse in Cornwall). It was overcast but cleared just at the right time and the gathering gloom was very impressive. If I had got my act together, I would have travelled to Cyprus for this one!

Never mind - they'll be another one along sometime - and i might have saved up enough time and leave to see it!

Litotes
 
#10
Litotes said:
Ord_Sgt said:
I experienced the last full eclipse just south of Vienna back in 99 I think it was. A very bizarre experience, appearing almost like night time but with the horizon all around like dawn. Well worth seeing if you ever get the chance.
I was in Wilton in 2000 for the last major partial eclipse (it was a total eclipse in Cornwall). It was overcast but cleared just at the right time and the gathering gloom was very impressive. If I had got my act together, I would have travelled to Cyprus for this one!

Never mind - they'll be another one along sometime - and i might have saved up enough time and leave to see it!

Litotes
http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/SEatlas/SEatlas3/SE2001-25T-1.GIF

Start planning and saving now then.
 
#11
Wow! Thanks for that! Just what I wanted and couldn't find on Google!

The 2008 eclipse looks a bit too difficult - over the Arctic and Russia - although it looks as if the area of totality is much greater than elsewhere.

The 2009 eclipse over India and the Far East looks worthwhile.

The 2012 eclipse over Queensland looks even better! And I think they have better weather.

I will start saving!

Litotes
 
#12
I assume, Anya, that you will have a very good view of the eclipse in Cyprus and you will probably have clear skies as well. Lucky!

Litotes
Ah, there you are...........very right! We are heading up Troodos Mountains for a better view!
 
#13
Aren't I lucky. From my house, tonight I can see a few stars, a little piece of the moon and a lot of darkness. It is about as interesting as seeing an eclipse. Not very.
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#14
Litotes said:
Anya1982 said:
Ah, another good excuse to bunk off work and stare at the sky!!!!

On 2006 March 29, a total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from within a narrow corridor which traverses half the Earth. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow begins in Brazil and extends across the Atlantic, northern Africa, and central Asia where it ends at sunset in western Mongolia. A partial eclipse will be seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes the northern two thirds of Africa, Europe, and central Asia.

Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for approximately 350 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile and the sky during totality. Information on safe eclipse viewing and eclipse photography is included
info
I assume, Anya, that you will have a very good view of the eclipse in Cyprus and you will probably have clear skies as well. Lucky!

Litotes
She'll be getting a great view of it.....................she'll be the cause of it.
 
#15
Biccie, your life that boring you have to stalk me around arrse and make the same boring comments as you have done for the past 12 months?

Get over your dull self and stop hi-jacking threads.

Prat.
 
#16
Well I am going to get to see the square root of sod all of the eclipse today.

Total overcast with rain.

Anyone got a sunny view??
 
#17
Sunny here, clear sky apart from the odd cloud, sun is out and the weatehr is warming up.

I will see it, if I ain't fallen asleep :cry:
 
#18
Looks clear here - I've even got the telescope out in case it works out for me - would love to get some photo's and the view'sthrough a scope is unbelievable.

By the way - I have solar filters fitted to my telescope so I know I'm safe but cane I just make the point that looking at the sun through black photographic material, squinting, whatever is not to be recommended - this will damage your eyes.

If you have a good location, the best way to see the eclipse is to make a pin-hole camera or have some old panels from arc weldong goggles or similar stuff.

PLEASE DO NOT LOOK DIRECTLY AT THE SUN, NOT EVEN IF IT HAS APPARENTLY GONE -THIS WILL PERMANENTLY DAMAGE YOUR EYES!

Sorry to shout,

P

added this link which is a pdf telling you how to safely look at the sun http://pwg.gsfc.nasa.gov/istp/outreach/sunobserve1.pdf
 
#20
The sun is about 1/4 covered by the moon here right now. Great view through my natty eclipse shades. It is already somewhat overcast and there is a real sense of excitement amongst the folk here. I'm off to enjoy the rest of it.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top