Ebola Watch!

oooo! Guess what's on freeview channel 30 5Star 18:30 saturday? OUTBREAK!
be interesting to see what they cut out of it as it's befor ethe watershed.

If you feel like getting yer nerdhead on and impressing [no, really] the bit that has Salmonella in a virology lab [or have salmonellae as cat4 pathogens] is 10 mins in, when they walk down the corridor in the Cat4 facility
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
What worries me is that although Ebola is a pretty deadly disease - which kills most people it infects - the people in Africa must have developed some degree of resistance to it; even a slight one.

Should it make it to one of the developed countries - where the people have not got any resistance at all to it - I think we'll see what Ebola can really do.

Wordsmith
 
What worries me is that although Ebola is a pretty deadly disease - which kills most people it infects - the people in Africa must have developed some degree of resistance to it; even a slight one.

Should it make it to one of the developed countries - where the people have not got any resistance at all to it - I think we'll see what Ebola can really do.

Wordsmith
Not much apaprently. If you count the US as a developed country that is.

Cases of Ebola Diagnosed in the United States | Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever | CDC
 
Not much apaprently. If you count the US as a developed country that is.

Cases of Ebola Diagnosed in the United States | Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever | CDC
Interesting reading.

I noticed that all 4 patients were treated at major teaching hospitals including one who was treated at Emory University Hospital which abuts the campus of the CDC in Atlanta. Of course the 2014 outbreak in Africa apparently involved an Ebola strain which displayed a lower mortality rate than earlier outbreaks.


Part of the problem with the during the earlier part of the 2014 outbreak was that Sambo was a bit over his head. Eventually the WHO brought in a Motswana doctor (I forget her name) who was pretty sharp and got things organized. From the US side of things, the US sent over RADM Sylvia Trent-Adams USPHS to take charge of the US response. She is a very sharp lady and is currently the Deputy Surgeon General of the US.
 
Ebola already made it to the States back in the Eighties - to Reston, Virginia to be more exact. A far more lethal strain than the one in the Congo just now. And just for more added giggles and shits scientists dealing with it thought it could be an airborne strain. That's sort of the anti-Holy Grail in the virus world - something no medic would ever want to deal with.

Fortunately, it only took out lower-order primates like Chimpanzees and the like - and pigs for some reason, or Virginia and Washington D.C. could have been up to their oxters in corpses. It was just about half a tick off of being lethal to humans (creating antibodies yet not causing illness and subsequent quite horrible death) and the scientists still haven't really been able to say why it didn't cross that particular species barrier, given that most other Ebola strains started off as not being lethal to humans but sure as hell are now.

Richard Preston wrote about the incident in his book, "The Hot Zone", Wikipedia page here:

The Hot Zone - Wikipedia
It's on my shelf of books themed around "Stuff I don't want to screw around with."
 
Ebola already made it to the States back in the Eighties - to Reston, Virginia to be more exact. A far more lethal strain than the one in the Congo just now. And just for more added giggles and shits scientists dealing with it thought it could be an airborne strain. That's sort of the anti-Holy Grail in the virus world - something no medic would ever want to deal with.

Fortunately, it only took out lower-order primates like Chimpanzees and the like - and pigs for some reason, or Virginia and Washington D.C. could have been up to their oxters in corpses. It was just about half a tick off of being lethal to humans (creating antibodies yet not causing illness and subsequent quite horrible death) and the scientists still haven't really been able to say why it didn't cross that particular species barrier, given that most other Ebola strains started off as not being lethal to humans but sure as hell are now.

Richard Preston wrote about the incident in his book, "The Hot Zone", Wikipedia page here:

The Hot Zone - Wikipedia
It's on my shelf of books themed around "Stuff I don't want to screw around with."
Glad you posted that, a very interesting book but I had forgotten the title and author when posting above.

Another really excellent book on Ebola is "Ebola: a Documentary Novel" by Dr William T. Close. Dr Close spent much of his life doing medical work in Africa and was involved in the first major Ebola outbreak in Zaire (Now Democratic Republic of the Congo) from the start of the outbreak. The book is interesting and quite readable. A good book if you want a grasp of what Ebola involves. Dr Close is also the father of actress Glenn Close*

Personal note: I am the same age as Glenn Close and we both lived in Greenwich Connecticut who I was in school. My boys school and her girls school were twinned for social events and I know I must have met her and probably danced with her when we were kids and I regret that I have no recollection of her at all.
 
This Doctor Congo, can't he sort them out?
 
On the BBC World Service this morning, bloke from the Congo was interviewed. He said there is a vaccine and it works. However:
- it is very hard for them to keep it at the required storage temperature, let alone doing so while transporting it...
- they have very few medical staff trained in it's use
- hospital premises have to be set aside and isolated for the purpose - it sounded like first action was to evacuate staff from the hospital before isolating it then waiting for training, although I could have missed something he said.
Sounds chaotic and unprepared, which doesn't bode well...
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Perhaps of interest is this report on the Congo outbreak

ESRI summary update on Ebola outbreak

From a conversation with a MD friend who works in Africa the new head of WHO-Africa is Dr Matshidiso Moeti who is a pretty sharp lady and a "breath of fresh air" after Sambo who was more of a political doctor
 
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