Eat your cornflakes...

I heard (Aberdonian in-laws) that leftover porridge was poured into the kitchen table drawer and left to set. Come tea time it was turned out, sliced and fried to eke out the rations.
How long was that? A bit like the tale I heard, but surely the porridge would have to be very thick to have any chance of drying out?
Never heard of it being fried, but poured into a drawer and left to set, yes. Porridge, like us, can be really thick, solid too in fact. A bit like the Cornish Pasty. A meal to take to work back in the day, before my time. The solid porridge could be sliced and taken to the fields/hills before the days of instant access to bread/rolls never mind supermarkets.

I also understand it could be used like a kaolin poultice. Never used it as such, but what I remember, painfully, of kaolin being put on a stubborn boil, and seeing/feeling the heat from porridge just cooked I can believe it.

Don't let my last put you off eating it. As that old joke goes when an English Lady heard we were fed on porridge said, "Oats! That's what we feed to our horses." The retort was, "Yes, and look at the horses you breed, and the men we breed."

There may be a slight bias to that joke, which I have no need, or intention, to apologise for.
 

Yokel

LE
Tea goes with pretty much anything, and I'm not sure on the cornflakes thing, though both they and rice crispies form part of a classic sweet treat up here by simple dint of mixing them with melted chocolate in a bowl, forming them into small balls and leaving them to cool.
You and @Fang_Farrier could go into business offering cereal based snacks via mail order. Also dental care products like a human version of those tooth cleaning things for dogs.

Never heard of it being fried, but poured into a drawer and left to set, yes. Porridge, like us, can be really thick, solid too in fact. A bit like the Cornish Pasty. A meal to take to work back in the day, before my time. The solid porridge could be sliced and taken to the fields/hills before the days of instant access to bread/rolls never mind supermarkets.

I also understand it could be used like a kaolin poultice. Never used it as such, but what I remember, painfully, of kaolin being put on a stubborn boil, and seeing/feeling the heat from porridge just cooked I can believe it.

Don't let my last put you off eating it. As that old joke goes when an English Lady heard we were fed on porridge said, "Oats! That's what we feed to our horses." The retort was, "Yes, and look at the horses you breed, and the men we breed."

There may be a slight bias to that joke, which I have no need, or intention, to apologise for.
I am of Scots descent on both sides of the family. Maybe that is why I like oats so much. Anything with oats.

Perhaps I could mix oat clusters with cornflakes?.
 
Last edited:

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
1579991631067128081359401327587.jpg


Skirlie.

Simply mix your oats with beef fat and if you feel the need for vegetables, finely chopped onion.
 

JackSofty

Old-Salt
Sorry Yokel, I should have taken more care when reading your post. I thought you were a fellow Jockanese, sorry for that too, and were taking the piss.

Pinhead porridge is not processed as much as the porridge oats that only takes a few minutes to cook, ie mix with hot/boiled milk and bingo, instant porridge.

I put 3 oz of pinhead, a pinch of salt, same with sugar and a pint of milk into a pan leaving it overnight. Heat slowly until milk* starts to boil, simmer for 15/20 mins, until it's as runny or thick as you like it, and there you have it. **Add what ever you like to taste.

*I know traditionally it should be made with water, but I like mine with milk.

** Another tradition, should be salt. Bollocks. At different times I've added sugar, syrup, prunes, yogurt. Your porridge, your taste.

ETA This is for two people.
Oats, water and salt. Job done.


Sent from my karzi while losing several pounds
 

JackSofty

Old-Salt
I heard (Aberdonian in-laws) that leftover porridge was poured into the kitchen table drawer and left to set. Come tea time it was turned out, sliced and fried to eke out the rations.
Cracking. Polenta? North London shites may understand but I doubt it.


Sent from my karzi while losing several pounds
 
I thought he enjoyed it and he got his kicks that way?



Not as bad as being ill though!

Most breakfast cereals have vitamins and fibre added, so that are not wholly bad. Many people add fruit as well. Simple plain cornflakes cannot have been processed much.

What about porridge oats - what level of processing have they been subject to? Or other oat based cereals?
Don't forget the iron filings.
 
They used to advertise Puffed Wheat as being 'Shot from guns'.

Never thought anything about it until having just read a book* which explains that essentially is what they still do.
According to the book, the grains are heated in a sealed container to a pressure of 205 psi then suddenly released, shooting out of the 'barrel' and thereby causing a chemical reaction that I can't begin to understand but it ends up with the Puff Wheat as we know it.
Link: AlexanderAnderson

*The Science of Food by Marty Jopson; which is actually more interesting to non-cooks like me than the title might suggest.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
I remember an old boy 35 years ago telling me that he would touch corn flakes. He said that as a lad he used to get them direct from the factory for use as animal feed.
Probably pulling your leg mate as he was most likely feeding his stock with flaked maize which looks like cornflakes but would break your teeth!
 
I heard (Aberdonian in-laws) that leftover porridge was poured into the kitchen table drawer and left to set. Come tea time it was turned out, sliced and fried to eke out the rations.
Porridge drawer.
 
I heard (Aberdonian in-laws) that leftover porridge was poured into the kitchen table drawer and left to set. Come tea time it was turned out, sliced and fried to eke out the rations.
or grilled and served with a wee bit of golden syrup drizzled over Mmmmm
 
You and @Fang_Farrier could go into business offering cereal based snacks via mail order. Also dental care products like a human version of those tooth cleaning things for dogs.



I am of Scots descent on both sides of the family. Maybe that is why I like oats so much. Anything with oats.

Perhaps I could mix oat clusters with cornflakes?.
I love having my oats too......oops, wrong thread
 

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