East Germany in racist Neo-Nazi shocker - Tell us it isn't true Bugsy

#81
Indeed. But his maths is somewhat odd, as also in the BAOR thread he claimed to have lived in the GDR for FIVE years. So, 14 months, 19 months or five years (eleventy six in base Abbott).
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#82
#84
Indeed. But his maths is somewhat odd, as also in the BAOR thread he claimed to have lived in the GDR for FIVE years. So, 14 months, 19 months or five years (eleventy six in base Abbott).
View attachment 339626
I remember the signs and they did say Berlin, Hauptstadt der DDR. The thing that confuses me is why anyone should want to live in the DDR at that time, at all. As for DDR and BRD skinhead neo-Nazi thugs, and Hitlerite right-wing extremism , they were evident soon after the wall came down.

Ingo Hasselbach -"Fuhrer of the East"- was a Neo-Nazi leader in East Berlin during the 1980s and 1990s, like Michael "Fourth Reich" Kühnen. Although Hasselbach turned over a new leaf, and Kühnen died of Aids. Führer-Ex : memoirs of a former Neo-Nazi (Book, 1996) [WorldCat.org]. To be fair to Germany, they cracked down hard on such militant bastards.

Neo-Nazis attacked asylum seekers and rioted in Rostock,1992 IIRC, and Turks also got it. When DDR Hitlerites got into the BRD, they didn't stop, as anyone on the end of their vile racism at the time would remember, but it wasn't just ex DDR thugs; "Deutschland for Deutschen" and "Auslaender Raus" memes were common in the united Germany. Nor would I consider the DDR was ever multicultural.
 
#86
#88
For some strange reason Merkel's dad packed up his family from West to East.

Not strange at all. It was her father's first church 'posting', 7 years before the Wall went up.

ETA. Now I've got the mash on for today's brew I'll add:

In 1954 the father finished his theological studies in Hamburg in the British Occupied Zone of defeated Germany and was 'posted' to a parish in Perleberg in the Soviet Occupied Zone at a time when the Western Occupied Zones were not yet in NATO and the Warsaw Pact was yet to be created. Living conditions in both zones would not have been ideal at the time and the DDR Govt was actively trying to shut down the Church, something they never quite managed to do:

UPHEAVAL IN THE EAST; Lutheran Church Gets a Bigger Role

As an aside, I spoke to several people in East Germany in the 1980s who had similar stories of being trapped on the wrong side of the Wall in 1961 when it went up overnight, eg a Forstmeister who had been visiting his mother in West Berlin and had then gone home to East Berlin for the night.
 
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#89
Not strange at all. It was her father's first church 'posting', 7 years before the Wall went up.

ETA. Now I've got the mash on for today's brew I'll add:

In 1954 the father finished his theological studies in Hamburg in the British Occupied Zone of defeated Germany and was 'posted' to a parish in Perleberg in the Soviet Occupied Zone at a time when the Western Occupied Zones were not yet in NATO and the Warsaw Pact was yet to be created. Living conditions in both zones would not have been ideal at the time and the DDR Govt was actively trying to shut down the Church, something they never quite managed to do:

UPHEAVAL IN THE EAST; Lutheran Church Gets a Bigger Role

As an aside, I spoke to several people in East Germany in the 1980s who had similar stories of being trapped on the wrong side of the Wall in 1961 when it went up overnight, eg a Forstmeister who had been visiting his mother in West Berlin and had then gone home to East Berlin for the night.
I stand corrected.
 
#90
Not strange at all. It was her father's first church 'posting', 7 years before the Wall went up.

ETA. Now I've got the mash on for today's brew I'll add:

In 1954 the father finished his theological studies in Hamburg in the British Occupied Zone of defeated Germany and was 'posted' to a parish in Perleberg in the Soviet Occupied Zone at a time when the Western Occupied Zones were not yet in NATO and the Warsaw Pact was yet to be created. Living conditions in both zones would not have been ideal at the time and the DDR Govt was actively trying to shut down the Church, something they never quite managed to do:

UPHEAVAL IN THE EAST; Lutheran Church Gets a Bigger Role

As an aside, I spoke to several people in East Germany in the 1980s who had similar stories of being trapped on the wrong side of the Wall in 1961 when it went up overnight, eg a Forstmeister who had been visiting his mother in West Berlin and had then gone home to East Berlin for the night.
How refreshing to find someone who speaks authoritatively about the GDR without lying or creating fantasy worlds.
 
#91
Not strange at all. It was her father's first church 'posting', 7 years before the Wall went up.

ETA. Now I've got the mash on for today's brew I'll add:

In 1954 the father finished his theological studies in Hamburg in the British Occupied Zone of defeated Germany and was 'posted' to a parish in Perleberg in the Soviet Occupied Zone at a time when the Western Occupied Zones were not yet in NATO and the Warsaw Pact was yet to be created. Living conditions in both zones would not have been ideal at the time and the DDR Govt was actively trying to shut down the Church, something they never quite managed to do:

UPHEAVAL IN THE EAST; Lutheran Church Gets a Bigger Role

As an aside, I spoke to several people in East Germany in the 1980s who had similar stories of being trapped on the wrong side of the Wall in 1961 when it went up overnight, eg a Forstmeister who had been visiting his mother in West Berlin and had then gone home to East Berlin for the night.


Hmm.. its strange that the family had privileges allowed them that normally only staunch "party" members got.
She was raised in the small, country side town of Templin, roughly 50 miles north of Berlin, in the German Democratic Republic (also known as East Germany). Living in the GDR meant that she was a part of the socialist-led Free German Youth movement. Through this organization she showed her leadership skills at a young age becoming a district board representative and secretary of Agitprop – the agitation and propaganda campaign of the youth movement.
Her family, led by her father who was a Lutheran pastor, had “sympathetic” views towards the communist regime of the GDR because they were given freedoms typically denied to Christian pastors – such as easily crossing from West Germany to East Germany, and owning two cars.
 

DaManBugs

LE
Book Reviewer
#92
I remember the signs and they did say Berlin, Hauptstadt der DDR. The thing that confuses me is why anyone should want to live in the DDR at that time, at all. As for DDR and BRD skinhead neo-Nazi thugs, and Hitlerite right-wing extremism , they were evident soon after the wall came down.

Ingo Hasselbach -"Fuhrer of the East"- was a Neo-Nazi leader in East Berlin during the 1980s and 1990s, like Michael "Fourth Reich" Kühnen. Although Hasselbach turned over a new leaf, and Kühnen died of Aids. Führer-Ex : memoirs of a former Neo-Nazi (Book, 1996) [WorldCat.org]. To be fair to Germany, they cracked down hard on such militant bastards.

Neo-Nazis attacked asylum seekers and rioted in Rostock,1992 IIRC, and Turks also got it. When DDR Hitlerites got into the BRD, they didn't stop, as anyone on the end of their vile racism at the time would remember, but it wasn't just ex DDR thugs; "Deutschland for Deutschen" and "Auslaender Raus" memes were common in the united Germany. Nor would I consider the DDR was ever multicultural.
[My bold in your post] I presume you mean me with your question about living in the GDR. I've always been a committed Socialist, and when I was given the opportunity to move to Berlin, Capital of the GDR from West Berlin, I decided to take up the offer. For all the very real shortcomings of the political system there, first and foremost the dire lack of genuine democracy, I really liked living there. It was a very egalitarian, intensely communal and inclusive society, notwithstanding that the "Nomenklatura" lived in a different world. For normal folks like me, life there was ideal.

Neo-Nazis in the GDR have always been around. While I was there in the late 1970s, they were generally regarded as a bit weird. The GDR was an anti-fascist society, but the myth generated by the GDR authorities that there were no longer any (neo-)Nazis in the country is just that; a myth. Things got worse after Gorbi came to power in the Soviet Union, and from about the middle of the 1980s on, because folks, especially the youth, were expecting far-reaching changes in their own country. Things got even worse when the GDR banned the Soviet magazine "Sputnik", which was reporting openly about all the wide-ranging socio-political changes in the Soviet Union.

The Stasi was clocking all that and sent regular reports to the Berlin HQ warning about such developments, but they were all dismissed by the Politburo because they were still on their "anti-fascist trip" and couldn't contemplate being wrong about it. Instead, everything was described as acts "hooliganism" and not neo-Nazi activity.

You're also wrong about the shite first hitting the fan in Rostock-Lichtenhagen in 1992. While there were also anti-contract-worker riots there (against the Vietnamese, whose country had refused to take them back), the initial flame was ignited in Hoyerswerda on 17 September 1991. That went on for about a fortnight and, because the Old Bill did very little, it inspired similar riots in place like Cottbus (where I was living at the time), Weißwasser, Magdeburg, Bautzen to name just a few.

The neo-Nazi activity is still a huge problem in East Germany, but it was initially ignored by the mainly Wessi authorities there, because West Germany has always essentially been a pro-fascist, racist country.

MsG
 
#93
[My bold in your post] I presume you mean me with your question about living in the GDR. I've always been a committed Socialist, and when I was given the opportunity to move to Berlin, Capital of the GDR from West Berlin, I decided to take up the offer. For all the very real shortcomings of the political system there, first and foremost the dire lack of genuine democracy, I really liked living there. It was a very egalitarian, intensely communal and inclusive society, notwithstanding that the "Nomenklatura" lived in a different world. For normal folks like me, life there was ideal.

Neo-Nazis in the GDR have always been around. While I was there in the late 1970s, they were generally regarded as a bit weird. The GDR was an anti-fascist society, but the myth generated by the GDR authorities that there were no longer any (neo-)Nazis in the country is just that; a myth. Things got worse after Gorbi came to power in the Soviet Union, and from about the middle of the 1980s on, because folks, especially the youth, were expecting far-reaching changes in their own country. Things got even worse when the GDR banned the Soviet magazine "Sputnik", which was reporting openly about all the wide-ranging socio-political changes in the Soviet Union.

The Stasi was clocking all that and sent regular reports to the Berlin HQ warning about such developments, but they were all dismissed by the Politburo because they were still on their "anti-fascist trip" and couldn't contemplate being wrong about it. Instead, everything was described as acts "hooliganism" and not neo-Nazi activity.

You're also wrong about the shite first hitting the fan in Rostock-Lichtenhagen in 1992. While there were also anti-contract-worker riots there (against the Vietnamese, whose country had refused to take them back), the initial flame was ignited in Hoyerswerda on 17 September 1991. That went on for about a fortnight and, because the Old Bill did very little, it inspired similar riots in place like Cottbus (where I was living at the time), Weißwasser, Magdeburg, Bautzen to name just a few.

The neo-Nazi activity is still a huge problem in East Germany, but it was initially ignored by the mainly Wessi authorities there, because West Germany has always essentially been a pro-fascist, racist country.

MsG
You assume wrong. Nobody mentioned "shite first hitting the fan first time", just you. Can't stop, love to chat but very busy. Cheers.
 
#94
[My bold in your post] I presume you mean me with your question about living in the GDR. I've always been a committed Socialist, and when I was given the opportunity to move to Berlin, Capital of the GDR from West Berlin, I decided to take up the offer. For all the very real shortcomings of the political system there, first and foremost the dire lack of genuine democracy, I really liked living there. It was a very egalitarian, intensely communal and inclusive society, notwithstanding that the "Nomenklatura" lived in a different world. For normal folks like me, life there was ideal.

Neo-Nazis in the GDR have always been around. While I was there in the late 1970s, they were generally regarded as a bit weird. The GDR was an anti-fascist society, but the myth generated by the GDR authorities that there were no longer any (neo-)Nazis in the country is just that; a myth. Things got worse after Gorbi came to power in the Soviet Union, and from about the middle of the 1980s on, because folks, especially the youth, were expecting far-reaching changes in their own country. Things got even worse when the GDR banned the Soviet magazine "Sputnik", which was reporting openly about all the wide-ranging socio-political changes in the Soviet Union.

The Stasi was clocking all that and sent regular reports to the Berlin HQ warning about such developments, but they were all dismissed by the Politburo because they were still on their "anti-fascist trip" and couldn't contemplate being wrong about it. Instead, everything was described as acts "hooliganism" and not neo-Nazi activity.

You're also wrong about the shite first hitting the fan in Rostock-Lichtenhagen in 1992. While there were also anti-contract-worker riots there (against the Vietnamese, whose country had refused to take them back), the initial flame was ignited in Hoyerswerda on 17 September 1991. That went on for about a fortnight and, because the Old Bill did very little, it inspired similar riots in place like Cottbus (where I was living at the time), Weißwasser, Magdeburg, Bautzen to name just a few.

The neo-Nazi activity is still a huge problem in East Germany, but it was initially ignored by the mainly Wessi authorities there, because West Germany has always essentially been a pro-fascist, racist country.

MsG
Bugsy why do you lie about your time in East Germany?
Was that due to a computer hacking/you winding people up but having to rush out to an emergency before you had time to say it was a wind up/you being high?
Or are you just a tragic attention seeker?
 
#96
No, don't stop him. I want to know about his fantasy girlfriend Gisela Capitain (incidentally Bogsy, spelt with a 'C' not a 'K' in all references that I can find. Born 1952 and all the information quoted by Drugsy can be found in Wiki with the aid of Google Translate.

I suggest that it's more likely that you were making picture frames and cups of tea than giving Gisela the benefit of your boxing hardened squaddie body.
 
#97
Her family, led by her father who was a Lutheran pastor, had “sympathetic” views towards the communist regime of the GDR because they were given freedoms typically denied to Christian pastors – such as easily crossing from West Germany to East Germany, and owning two cars.
The family originated from West Germany and unless they had renounced their citizenship, they would have been able to cross from East to West just like any tourist from the West.
 
#99
Wouldn't they have to prove they were Wezzies, by some means?
Presumably they would have had West German passports. No one who had free access to the West can truly know what it was like to live behind the wall.................even if they do speak German!
 
Presumably they would have had West German passports. No one who had free access to the West can truly know what it was like to live behind the wall.................even if they do speak German!
That particular pfennig dropped just after I'd posted.

I guess I was really thinking about the poor sod in Brotherton Lad's post, who didn't need a passport to get in - then they built the wall overnight, and couldn't get back!
 

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