Reference Image Early truck-makers Pt1

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#1
Armstrong-Saurer

Armstrong-Saurer was a brand of truck produced in Newcastle by Armstrong Whitworth from 1931 till 1937. The Swiss deigned Saurer was built under license by Armstrong-Whitworth in the UK. Saurer commercial vehicles were designed and produced in Switzerland by Adohlf Saurer AG from 1902 till 1982. The UK firm of Pickfords were an importer from 1907 in the UK. Then in 1930 Armstrong Whitworth who were loooking to diversify from the armaments business obtained a licensed to produce the Sauer trucks at its Scotswood-on-Tyne works for the UK market. The First UK built models were shown at the 1931 Commercial Motor Show in London, but by 1937 Production ceased.
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Armstrong-Saurer Samson

William Beardmore and Company
William Beardmore and Company was a Scottish engineering and shipbuilding conglomerate based in Glasgow and the surrounding Clydeside area. It was active from 1886 to the mid-1930s and at its peak employed about 40,000 people. It was founded and owned by William Beardmore, later Lord Invernairn, after whom the Beardmore Glacier was named.
In 1917, Beardmore bought Sentinel Waggon Works, a manufacturer of steam-powered railway locomotives, railcars and road vehicles. In 1919 a range of cars was announced, to be made by a subsidiary company, Beardmore Motors Ltd, based in factories in Glasgow and the surrounding area; Anniesland, Coatbridge and Paisley.
The post war recession hit the firm hard, and the shipyard was forced to close in 1930. Part of the site and some of the existing buildings later became incorporated into ROF Dalmuir, part was used by the General Post Office for their cable-laying ships.
Beardmore's various companies became unprofitable in the post-WW1 slump, resulting in the company facing bankruptcy. Financial aid initially came from Vickers Limited, which took a 60 per cent stake in Beardmores, before pulling out in the late 1920s. Beardmore himself was removed from executive control of his company by the Bank of England. Most of Beardmore's various businesses were wound down over the next few years until Beardmore's retirement and death in 1936, although some persisted.

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Beardmore

John Fowler & Co. (Leeds)
John Fowler was an agricultural engineer and inventor who was born in Wiltshire in 1826. He worked on the mechanisation of agriculture and was based in Leeds. He is credited with the invention of steam-driven ploughing engines. He died 4 December 1864, following a hunting accident. After his death, John Fowler & Co., was then continued by Robert Fowler and Robert Eddison. In 1886 the limited company of John Fowler & Co., (Leeds) Ltd., was formed. It merged with Marshall, Sons & Co., Ltd., of Gainsborough in 1947 to form Marshall-Fowler Ltd.
Although not well known for them, Fowler also built a small number (117 has been claimed) of steam wagons. These were vertical-boilered, with an unusual single-crank cross-compound vee-twin engine. They featured a gearbox (but no clutch) to provide a low drive ratio for climbing steep hills with heavy loads. At least one was preserved, as part of the Tom Varley collection.
During the Second World War, the Hunslet factory also produced Matilda, Cromwell, and Centaur tanks for the Army. Production finally ceased in early 1974.

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Fowler Roadless Tractor
 
#2
John Fowler and Co (Leeds) now owned by a chum of mine. I did some work for him, it was quite cool to get a cheque from John Fowler (Leeds) Ltd.

As for Saurer they were actually "taken over" by a number of entities: Armstrong Whitworth being just one. In the USA for instance, Saurer manufacturing became part of the Mack empire. Elsewhere the company ran subsidiaries in Austria (1906–1959, in the end taken over by Steyr Damler Puch), France (1910–1956, taken over by Unic), and in Germany(1915–1918, taken over by MAN).

In Italy, OM was for many years a builder of Saurer engines and other mechanical units, which they used in their own ranges of trucks and buses.
 
#6
Thanks Truxx, I saw the Albion on the rad, but had no idea on the others. Think you might be right on the Ford. Zoomed in and it does look a bit like the Ford script. Get the middle one and you deserve a can of Vimto!
 

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#7
Can anyone identify these commercials?

View attachment 358678
Although it isn't the easiest to see, the middle vehicle is very probably a Morris-Commercial. Left hand one is definitely an Albion and the Right hand one is either a Ford or a Halley. Again the badge isn't clear.
 
#8
Thanks Truxx, I saw the Albion on the rad, but had no idea on the others. Think you might be right on the Ford. Zoomed in and it does look a bit like the Ford script. Get the middle one and you deserve a can of Vimto!
Might have to call the cavalry in on that one - talk amongst yourselves for a moment...
 
#9
Although it isn't the easiest to see, the middle vehicle is very probably a Morris-Commercial. Left hand one is definitely an Albion and the Right hand one is either a Ford or a Halley. Again the badge isn't clear.
Wrong rad badge for a Morris Commercial - plus the Morris didn't have the tapered/sloped bonnet that one has. The RH one is a Ford TT I think
 

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#11
Right then. My big brother thinks it's a Guy - sloping bonnet. Because he is an even big spotter than me he thinks its a 1 ton "JA". View attachment 358706
You could have it there. I've e-mailed Vimto as the photo is on the header of their history page.
I have double-checked and I am wrong about the Morris Commercial badge. Mind you, the one we think is a Ford also resembles an early-war Dennis!
 
#12
You could have it there. I've e-mailed Vimto as the photo is on the header of their history page.
I have double-checked and I am wrong about the Morris Commercial badge. Mind you, the one we think is a Ford also resembles an early-war Dennis!
The early Dennis had a much more distinctive cast rad surround, by the 20s it was still cast (the Ford one was a pressing) but had quite a large "Dennis" cast into it.
 

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