Eagle Parachute Centre Lympne

Hi, er, if that Tim mentioned was a young local civvy, that was me..
Eagle was only realy scarey if you knew better,having been bought up around the forces, mostly raf, I knew full well that nasty things happen even when everything 100% OK, so even knowing better, I still had fun with capt A..
I'm living on the canals now, there does seem to be a strange anomaly in the number of ex paras that seem to be living on canals too, you would expect there to be a small number,6 or 7 say but I must have met or heard of about 20 already,just in this area (watford) and I've only been on canals for 7 months !
From one extreme to the other, 200mph downwards turns into 4 (FOUR) mph horizontal !!
Sorry I’ve only just seen this ‘Tim’ !
It wouldn’t have been you as the Tim I mentioned was in 24fld Sqn RE also on trade training. Weds afternoon was sports day for us and we zipped down to Lympne to jump or get pissed if the weather was plop. Never went back after our courses finished.
 

Gbags

Crow
My story is pretty similar. Trade continuation training at Chatham after AAC Chepstow and before Cove, we got offered ‘something more interesting’ on Wednesday afternoons. I was probably 18 or 19 and and it was about 1978.
I’d forgotten the names but the pilot was an ex-SAS captain and fiery if you We’re slow getting into the plane. Jump master was ex-SAS Sargeant if memory serves. He liked Joan Baez piped through the bar. There was also an ex-SAS major there who was very friendly and laid back. I hitched hiked down every weekend and kipped in the hangar and this major twice drove me with him for breakfast in some cafe. He was only helping out but I’m glad to hear that he wasn’t killed that day.
My first jump was amazing. I wanted to both fling it about but stay up as long as possible. When I landed I grabbed up the chute, ran to the hangar, ditched it, grabbed another packed one and sprinted back out to the queue again. Couldn’t stop grinning for days.
 
My story is pretty similar. Trade continuation training at Chatham after AAC Chepstow and before Cove, we got offered ‘something more interesting’ on Wednesday afternoons. I was probably 18 or 19 and and it was about 1978.
I’d forgotten the names but the pilot was an ex-SAS captain and fiery if you We’re slow getting into the plane. Jump master was ex-SAS Sargeant if memory serves. He liked Joan Baez piped through the bar. There was also an ex-SAS major there who was very friendly and laid back. I hitched hiked down every weekend and kipped in the hangar and this major twice drove me with him for breakfast in some cafe. He was only helping out but I’m glad to hear that he wasn’t killed that day.
My first jump was amazing. I wanted to both fling it about but stay up as long as possible. When I landed I grabbed up the chute, ran to the hangar, ditched it, grabbed another packed one and sprinted back out to the queue again. Couldn’t stop grinning for days.
You and I would have been jumping at the same time. Staff I recall were Alex Black, Andy Anderson and Les Riley.
 

Gbags

Crow
You and I would have been jumping at the same time. Staff I recall were Alex Black, Andy Anderson and Les Riley.
Could Les have been the SAS Major.
I also remember the pictures on the wall. One showed a plane going down vertically because it’s tail wheel had snagged a chute.
Another showed a partially opened chute at about tree height, desperately late opening. We were told that this jumper survived, but we were teenage soldiers and knew that we were immortal.
Another showed a real wrinkly old relic of about, oh my age nowmaking his first jump.

I also remember the sky blue British Parachute Association Sweat shirts! God, how cool were they!
 

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