E-petition to have junior service included into pensions

Guys,
There's a fair few of us Ex-JLR's out there and not sure if it'll make a difference but theres an E-petition underway to get our time as juniors to be taken into account for any pension.

I'm not sure why this is the only job where your pension was never based on your start date but only once you turned 18 meaning you could have served anything between 2.5-1.5yrs before your pension rights started. Can anyone explain?

http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/67611
 

ERFPO

Old-Salt
Guys,
There's a fair few of us Ex-JLR's out there and not sure if it'll make a difference but theres an E-petition underway to get our time as juniors to be taken into account for any pension.

I'm not sure why this is the only job where your pension was never based on your start date but only once you turned 18 meaning you could have served anything between 2.5-1.5yrs before your pension rights started. Can anyone explain?

http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/67611
Because you were only playing at being soldiers for this period perhaps?
What next..".I was in the Cadets for 6 years...blah blah blah"
 
Hell, I joined at 17 and my pension didn't start counting until I was 21. I'd love more money (I am sufficiently normal) but I'm not going to campaign for retrospective change of a 1975 law ...
 
Can I get a pension for being at school too?
 

ironr4tions

Old-Salt
As an ex-Apprentice I appreciate the sentiment, however we knew when we signed up that it didn't count towards our pension. We also had a chance to count the service when AFPS05 came in, if we wished to transfer.

Now if someone could get rid of AFPS15, that would be helpful!


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Can I get a pension for being at school too?

No, it would have to be time spent in proper uniform, not grey shorts and blazer. Now, me, I worked my way up to sixer from the cubs to the scouts. Surely my time with a woggle should count towards my pension?

Oh, and when I left the Forces and joined a civvy firm, the rule was that you had to spend 2 years with the firm before being allowed to join their pension scheme so the Army system is not the only one that doesn't start from your "join" date.
 

ERFPO

Old-Salt
We have body armour. What we don't have is the 30,000 reserves that we are meant to, therefore we are providing incentives.
Incentives ..now there's a word close to my heart when it comes to serving my time as a Regular.
I remember the Incentive I had to extend my Initial service to 9 years when re trading in the Engineers.
"You get £1,500 quid at your 6 year point blah blah blah"
5 years later.....
"By the way your 6 year money(4 months away)is out the window they are effectively handing your 6 year money to the 3 year bongos as an Incentive to stay on sorry bud that's just how it goes..."

PVR'd after I returned from Bosnia Out in 5 weeks.(a Regimental Record I gather at 35 in Hameln at the time -amazing the power a bottle of Asbach can have over a corrupt Chief Clerk).

Cuntz.:shakefist:
 
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Only if I can get it for my two years in college, as well.
 
Other govt-funded organisations got the same hit. In 1978, I was astounded to get a cheque for more than a month's money, along with a letter saying they've given me back what they'd taken for pension between 16 - 18 years of age, because they shouldn't have taken it in the first place. On the day, I was like a dog with two dicks and never for one moment thought I'd actually survive to pensionable age anyway. And that was the end of 16 year-olds qualifying for pensionable time.
 

Cpl_Clot

War Hero
, along with a letter saying they've given me back what they'd taken for pension between 16 - 18 years of age, because they shouldn't have taken it in the first place.

Bingo!

Your pension became payable once you began contributing. Your (our, ex-IJLB here) made no contribution from your salary until aged 18.
 
B

bokkatankie

Guest
Guys,
There's a fair few of us Ex-JLR's out there and not sure if it'll make a difference but theres an E-petition underway to get our time as juniors to be taken into account for any pension.

I'm not sure why this is the only job where your pension was never based on your start date but only once you turned 18 meaning you could have served anything between 2.5-1.5yrs before your pension rights started. Can anyone explain?

http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/67611
Sure as hell not the only job. Take a look at huge range of civvie jobs and what did or did not count towards pensionable service. They will not get and neither will you.
 
Because you were only playing at being soldiers for this period perhaps?
What next..".I was in the Cadets for 6 years...blah blah blah"

Nope, continuous training and subject to military law as well would be a better description. That's why when I had completed two years as a boy soldier and I was sent to the rifle depot at Winchester, I was only there for six weeks before I was sent onto my battalion.

You weren't in a military orientated youth organisation with volunteer adults turning up one or two evenings a week. You were in the army. The instructors, both the senior NCO's and the officers were regular army staff posted to the junior battalion.

You were paid by the army, a pittance but even so. If you required serious medical attention, you were sent to an army hospital. You spent a lot of time learning all the skills required to be a well trained infantryman including firing the whole spectrum of infantry weapons from a browning 9mm pistol to the carl gustav anti tank weapon.

Being subject to military discipline meant you could be banged up in the guardhouse cells for unto 28 days if you were a really naughty boy and rops were a reality if you were a not quite so naughty boy. And of course, it was a full time occupation with an employment contract. You know, like the adults had!

Of course you couldn't be sent anywhere dangerous. You weren't old enough. You couldn't drink in the pubs because you were too young. You weren't allowed to get any tattoos because you were too young. Sport activities and adventure training were a large part of the training and the army did make some effort to try and continue some educational stuff to see if you wanted to get any educational exams.

It didn't count towards service recorded in the red book when you eventually left and when you joined man service, you kept your head down if you had any sense because nobody likes a know-all. From a personal persecutive, I enjoyed it even though it was probably the most rigorous part of my service for two years. If I'm ever asked about the length of my service, I never include the boy service bit in my reply because it's not really done to do so but it was honestly serious training shit without any of the dangerous bits like Northern Ireland because you weren't old enough.
 

ERFPO

Old-Salt
Nope, continuous training and subject to military law as well would be a better description. That's why when I had completed two years as a boy soldier and I was sent to the rifle depot at Winchester, I was only there for six weeks before I was sent onto my battalion.

You weren't in a military orientated youth organisation with volunteer adults turning up one or two evenings a week. You were in the army. The instructors, both the senior NCO's and the officers were regular army staff posted to the junior battalion.

You were paid by the army, a pittance but even so. If you required serious medical attention, you were sent to an army hospital. You spent a lot of time learning all the skills required to be a well trained infantryman including firing the whole spectrum of infantry weapons from a browning 9mm pistol to the carl gustav anti tank weapon.

Being subject to military discipline meant you could be banged up in the guardhouse cells for unto 28 days if you were a really naughty boy and rops were a reality if you were a not quite so naughty boy. And of course, it was a full time occupation with an employment contract. You know, like the adults had!

Of course you couldn't be sent anywhere dangerous. You weren't old enough. You couldn't drink in the pubs because you were too young. You weren't allowed to get any tattoos because you were too young. Sport activities and adventure training were a large part of the training and the army did make some effort to try and continue some educational stuff to see if you wanted to get any educational exams.

It didn't count towards service recorded in the red book when you eventually left and when you joined man service, you kept your head down if you had any sense because nobody likes a know-all. From a personal persecutive, I enjoyed it even though it was probably the most rigorous part of my service for two years. If I'm ever asked about the length of my service, I never include the boy service bit in my reply because it's not really done to do so but it was honestly serious training shit without any of the dangerous bits like Northern Ireland because you weren't old enough.
That will be the soldiering bit that earns your Pension.
 

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