Dysfunctional relationship betwen the most senior commanders

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by Skynet, Jan 13, 2010.

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  1. From The Times
    Military Matters
    The dysfunctional relationship betwen the most senior commanders of the Armed Forces is an open secret and has an effect on the ground. It must be put right

    If the soldiers fighting on the front line in Afghanistan — not to mention their families worrying at home — could see the animosities being played out by their most senior commanders, they would be appalled. Under the leadership of Air Chief Marshal Sir Jock Stirrup, the Chief of the Defence Staff, the last three heads of the Army, Royal Navy and Royal Air Force were barely on speaking terms. If Sir Jock is now to be asked to retire, this is not before time.

    Some within the military’s top brass fear that the early removal of Sir Jock by an incoming Conservative government — or by a Labour government with new priorities — would be a political intervention too far. This is misguided. Sir Jock’s position is already political. His term was due to end in 2009 but was extended to 2011 by Gordon Brown as part of a “fix” to rule out the ascension of Sir Richard Dannatt, the former Chief of the General Staff. Sir Richard been frequently scathing of government policy and now looks set for a Conservative ministerial role.

    This extension did much to earn Sir Jock the ire of Sir Richard, and also of Admiral Sir Jonathon Band, the then First Sea Lord. Both men would otherwise have been contenders for the highest military office in the land.

    Even in his orginal tenure, it was widely felt within Whitehall that neither man fully respected Sir Jock’s experience or judgment, or the military advice he was delivering to the Prime Minister. It is less than a year since Sir Jock oversaw their wholesale replacement, and the chiefs of staff are still a dysfunctional unit. At the very least, a CDS should command the respect of these three men. With a strategic defence review pending, and with inevitable bickering between the Services about their relative future roles, a far stronger lead is required.
    More
    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/leading_article/article6982968.ece
     
  2. I have a deeply ingrained habit - loyalty to our own.
     
  3. Shame it never rubbed off on Stirrup.

    Self-serving, spineless lightweight crab bureaucrat.

    Just what the LieBore gunmint wanted . . . . the nation should be deeply grateful to them in these times of conflict.